Getting Started in a Major or Minor

Your major is the subject area which you will study in depth in order to develop expertise and critical thinking skills. Students must complete one major to graduate. Students must declare a major by the end of their sophomore year and no later than the start of their final semester at Brandeis. View the list of majors offered at Brandeis.

In addition to a major, students have the opportunity to select a minor. A minor can be a limited version of a major, a more specialized subset of a particular field of study, or a structured opportunity to explore areas of study that are interdisciplinary in scope. Minors are optional. Satisfactory completion of a minor is noted on a student's transcript. View the list of minors offered at Brandeis.

Requirements for majors offered by each department and program are listed in the subject area sections of the Bulletin.

Most undergraduate departments and programs offer introductory courses to the major and minor. These courses are appropriate for first-year students and can be a first look for students in becoming major or minor. Information about the areas of study offered at Brandeis has been provided by the departments and programs below.

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African and Afro-American Studies

Course of Study: Major, Minor
Visit the African and Afro-American Studies website
Find the Undergraduate Advising Head

Career advice for a major in African and Afro-American Studies

Recommended first course: AAAS 5a Introduction to African and Afro-American Studies

Other recommended courses: AAAS 115a Introduction to African History

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African and Afro-American Studies (AAAS) is a unique opportunity to explore the histories and experiences of Africans and African descended people and their impact on the world. Using multiple disciplines and strategies we offer courses that consider culture, class, gender, race, work and citizenship.

American Studies

Course of Study: Major
Visit the American Studies website
Find the Undergraduate Advising Head

Career advice for a major in American Studies

Recommended first course: AMST 66b American Scholars: Intellectuals in American Life

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American Studies takes an interdisciplinary approach to the culture, society, politics, institutions, identities, thoughts, values, and behavior of Americans, including the critical issues that confront the United States domestically and internationally. Using materials central to social and intellectual history— film, literature, culture, music, art and architecture, oral history— the major is designed to provide students with an educated awareness of the way the United States, viewed as a civilization, frames the lives, aspirations, and self-perceptions of its citizens. 

Anthropology

Course of Study: Major, Minor
Visit the Anthropology website
Find the Undergraduate Advising Head

Career advice for a major in Anthropology

Recommended first course: ANTH 1a Introduction to the Comparative Study of Human Societies

Other recommended courses: ANTH 7a Great Discoveries in Archaeology
ANTH 55 Anthropology of Development
ANTH 60a Archaeological Methods
ANTH 81a Conducting Ethnographic Fieldwork: Methods and Practice of Anthropological Research

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Anthropology explores the dynamics and diversity of humankind. It asks a most difficult and most important question: What does it mean to be human? The discipline ranges from the study of culture and social relations, to human biology and evolution, to economics and politics, to religion and world views, to languages and the connections between language and social dynamics, to visual cultures and architecture, to medicine and disease, and to what we can learn about past societies through the study of material culture, including paintings, earthenware vessels, religious figurines, discarded stone tools, bone fragments, and the foundations of ancient homes. Due to its focus on human society and culture, anthropology provides a solid background for students preparing for a broad range of professions including medicine, law, public health, public policy, social work, museum studies, and business, as well as a career in anthropology itself.

Architectural Studies
Art History
Biochemistry

Course of Study: Major
Visit the Biochemistry website
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Career advice for a major in Biochemistry

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The biochemistry major is designed to equip students with a broad understanding of the chemical and molecular events involved in biological processes. The biochemistry major provides a fundamental training for careers in biomedical research, medicine, biotechnology, and related fields.

During the first year, students usually take one year of general chemistry (CHEM 11,b with corresponding lab CHEM 18a,b or honors chemistry CHEM 15a,b with corresponding lab CHEM 19a,b). In addition, students are encouraged to take introductory physics (PHYS 11,b or the honors version PHYS 15a,b) and the accompanying lab, PHYS 19a,b, along with math at the appropriate level.

First year students considering the biochemistry major should note that many of the required science courses are dependent on prerequisites. Therefore, students should familiarize themselves with the biochemistry major requirements and plan their program of courses carefully. The undergraduate advising head can provide advice if students have questions or concerns.

Biological Physics
Biology

Course of Study: Major
Visit the Biology website
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Career advice for a major in Biology

Recommended first courses: BIOL 14a Genetics and Genomics
BIOL 15b Cells and Organisms
BIOL 16a Evolution and Biodiversity

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Core courses required for both the BA and BS degrees include the introductory biology series BIOL 14a (Genetics and Genomics), BIOL 15b (Cells and Organisms) and BIOL 16a (Evolution and Biodiversity), which can be taken in any order. These courses have no corequisites or prerequisites, and can be taken as early as the first year. The most important course to take in the first year is BIOL 15b, because it is a prerequisite for the lab course (BIOL 18b) that many students take in fall of their second year.

Because most biology elective courses have as prerequisites one or both of BIOL 14a and BIOL 15b, many students take these before BIOL 16a so that they can begin taking electives during the second year. Alternatively, students may begin the biology series with BIOL 16a in the fall, BIOL 15b in the spring, and BIOL 14a the following fall. This is a good option for students who are most interested in organismal biology, ecology or evolution. A further alternative is to wait until the spring semester, and begin the biology series with BIOL 15b. This may work well for students who want to ease in by starting with only a chemistry class (below) and/or math in their first semester.

Most students with strong science backgrounds enroll in the first year in the CHEM 11a,b or CHEM 15a,b General Chemistry series, which are required for the biology major, along with their laboratories CHEM 18a,b or CHEM 19a,b. Students who feel less strong in science may choose to postpone chemistry until the second year. Students who feel less prepared in math but intend to take calculus later are encouraged to enroll in MATH 5a, Precalculus, in their first year.

BIOL 15b is the prerequisite for BIOL 18b.

BIOL 14a and BIOL 18b are the prerequisites for BIOL 18a.

Business

Course of Study: Major, Minor
Visit the Business website
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Career advice for a major in Business

Recommended first course: ECON 2a A Survey of Economics or ECON 10a Introduction to Microeconomics

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Administered and staffed by the International Business School and the College of Arts and Sciences, our undergraduate programs in Business teach a way of thinking that cuts across disciplines and is rooted in practice. Undergraduates are offered an array of business courses that cover all the primary business disciplines at both the introductory and advanced level, supported by a large number of liberal arts courses. A combination of these courses can be pursued to fulfill either a major or minor in Business. The program is designed to complement nicely with any other Brandeis concentration. Indeed, leveraging the strength of a Brandeis liberal arts education is a cornerstone of the undergraduate Business program.

Students should begin with ECON 2a or ECON 10a, as either serves as a prerequisite to all business couses. BUS 1b may be taken after your freshman year, and may be exempted by quantitative courses taken in Biology, Economics, Mathematics, Politics or Psychology.

Chemistry

Course of Study: Major, Minor
Visit the Chemistry website
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Career advice for a major in Chemistry

Recommended first courses: CHEM 11a General Chemistry I and CHEM 18a General Chemistry Laboratory I
CHEM 15a Honors General Chemistry I and CHEM 19a Honors General Chemistry Laboratory I

Courses for students not majoring in a science: CHSC 4b Understanding the Chemistry of Sustainability

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Chemistry focuses on how atoms of just a few dozen types combine to form countless molecules, and how these molecules interact with each other to form the materials we encounter in our everyday lives. Chemistry is therefore called “the central science,” the material realization of principles of physics, and a foundation of the life sciences.

General Chemistry is a required course in the chemistry, biology, biochemistry, and neuroscience majors. It is also required of pre-medical, pre- dental, and pre-veterinary students, so most first year students with these academic and/or professional interests enroll in this introductory course.

We offer introductory chemistry for two levels of preparation: General Chemistry (CHEM 11a with corresponding lab CHEM 18a) and Honors Chemistry (CHEM 15a with corresponding lab CHEM 19a). At each level, the lecture and lab courses are separate and require separate registrations.

For detailed placement information, refer to www.brandeis.edu/registrar/newstudent/testing.html. The placement article discusses the differences between CHEM 11/18 and CHEM 15/19, as well as the possibility of advanced placement into Organic Chemistry (CHEM 25a with corresponding lab CHEM 29a). Students must register for both lecture and lab.

Students with AP (4 or 5), UK A-level or IB Chemistry credit may also consider taking Organic Chemistry Lecture and Laboratory courses (CHEM 25a and CHEM 29a). Organic chemistry focuses on the structure and reactivity of carbon-based molecules, and has direct implications in a variety of fields including biology and biochemistry. These courses are required for most science-related undergraduate programs as well as application to many graduate programs. Taking organic chemistry in the first year allows more time in subsequent years to take advanced courses and carry out research. Students considering this option are encouraged to consult with Professors Mascall (kmascall@brandeis.edu), Krauss (kraussi@brandeis.edu), or Snider (snider@brandeis.edu). Note: students electing to take AP credit for first-year chemistry must begin their chemistry career at Brandeis University with CHEM 25a.

Please note that chemistry lab sections have limited enrollment and that care must be taken to avoid conflicts between labs and other courses.

Classical Studies

Course of Study: Major, Minor
Visit the Classical Studies website
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Career advice for a major in Classical Studies

Recommended first courses: LAT 10a Beginning Latin (or higher level by placement)
GRK 10a Beginning Ancient Greek (or higher level by placement)

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The Department of Classical Studies offers courses in the languages, literatures, histories, art, and archaeology of Ancient Greece and Rome. A major in Classical Studies affords students the opportunity to learn about two classical civilizations that had a major impact on the cultures of the western world.

The requirements for the major are designed to be flexible, giving students the ability to plan their program around a particular interest—for example, history, literature, language, or art and archaeology.

Comparative Literature and Culture

Course of Study: Major, Minor
Visit the Comparative Literature and Culture website
Find the Undergraduate Advising Head

Recommended first courses: COML 100a Introduction to Global Literature
COML 123a Perfect Love?
COML/ENG 144a Island Fictions

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Discover the joy of beauty in your intellectual life. Learn what it really means to be ‘cultured.’ Realize your power to define your own cultural identity, rather than let others do it for you. Find out why the social sciences are just now discovering what we already know: you can learn the most about both individuals and societies through their cultural products of expression. We welcome students of all majors and levels to enroll in our courses; try one and we know you’ll be back for more.

Computer Science

Course of Study: Major, Minor
Visit the Computer Science website
Find the Undergraduate Advising Head

Career advice for a major in Computer Science

Recommended first courses: COSI 11a Programming in Java and C
COSI 29a Discrete Structures

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The Department of Computer Science teaches students the theoretical fundamentals and practical aspects of computing– to prepare students for innovative jobs in the computer field or for graduate study. Besides a full range of CS courses, we also offer classes in entrepreneurship, to ready students for working in start-up companies.

Computer science majors have access to the Vertica Lounge, an innovative space for study and collaboration, and advanced servers for computing-intensive and online projects. Students can also do research with a faculty member as part of independent study or an honors project. Faculty research interests include artificial intelligence, computational linguistics, data compression, computer networks and systems, databases, human centered computing, educational technology, computer vision and machine learning.

Creative Writing
Creativity, the Arts, and Social Transformation

Course of Study: Minor
Find the Undergraduate Advising Head

Recommended first courses: CAST 150b Introduction to Creativity, the Arts, and Social Transformation

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The interdepartmental minor in Creativity, the Arts, and Social Transformation offers students the opportunity to explore theory and practice at the center of arts and culture, peace and justice, and creativity.  A minor in Creativity, the Arts, and Social Transformation is designed for students in the arts who want to connect their creative talents to their concerns for social change, and for students in the humanities and social sciences to explore music, theater, literature and visual arts as resources for justice and peace.

Students in the minor are required to take an introductory course, Introduction to Creativity, the Arts and Social Transformation (CAST 150b), offered next in fall 2016. All minors will choose from a list of elective courses, one each from the Creative Arts, the Humanities and Social Sciences.  To complete the minor, students are required to complete a capstone experience.

East Asian Studies

Course of Study: Major, Minor
Visit the East Asian Studies website
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Career advice for a major in East Asian Studies

Recommended first courses: CHIN 10a Beginning Chinese I (or higher level by placement)
HIST 80a Introduction to East Asian Civilization
JAPN 10a Beginning Japanese (or higher level by placement)

Other recommended courses: CHIN 100a Introduction to Chinese Literature: Desire and Form
ECON 30a The Economy of China
JAPN 125b Putting Away Childish Things: Coming of Age in Modern Japanese Literature and Film

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Interested in learning more about the East Asian civilization? East Asian Studies is an interdisciplinary program that provides students with a deeper understanding of both current and historic East Asia while exploring history, politics, economics, arts, and the languages of East Asia.

Economics

Course of Study: Major, Minor
Visit the Economics website
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Career advice for a major in Economics

Recommended first courses: ECON 10a Introduction to Microeconomics
MATH 10a Techniques of Calculus (a)

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Economics is the social science that studies the roles of prices, markets, institutions, technology, and government policies in determining patterns of human behavior and economic activity, including production, employment, economic growth, living standards, and the distribution of income in modern economies. Students are drawn to the subject by several distinct aspects of the field: its rigorous quantitative methods, its relationship to the business sector, and its numerous applications to controversial issues of public policy such as the environment, health care, taxation, regulation of financial markets, and international trade.

Students are exempt from ECON 10a if they have AP credit for micro or transfer credit for a one-semester Introduction to Microeconomics course or an Introduction to Economics course that covers both micro and macro. Students are exempt from ECON 20a if they have AP credit for macro or transfer credit for a one-semester Introduction to Macroeconomics course. Students who only have credit for Introduction to Macroeconomics should take ECON 10a.

Calculus is a requirement for the major and a prerequisite for the intermediate theory courses (ECON 80a, 82b, 83a, and 184b). Students interested in becoming Economics majors who have not taken calculus should register for MATH 10a. Students who have had calculus and received at least a 4 on the AP Mathematics AB test or at least a 3 on the AP Mathematics BC test satisfy the calculus requirement. Students who have had calculus but do not otherwise satisfy the requirement can take the department calculus exam given at the beginning of each semester. Students must satisfy the calculus requirement before enrolling in the intermediate theory courses and will be automatically dropped from these courses if at any point it is determined that the prerequisite has not been satisfied.

Transfer students planning an Economics major should contact Professor Redenius as soon as possible to apply transfer credits to the major and discuss appropriate courses to take during their first semester at Brandeis.

Education

Course of Study: Major, Minor
Visit the Education program website
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Career advice for a major in Education Studies

Recommended first courses: ED 100a Exploring Teaching (Elementary and Preschool)
ED 100b Exploring Teaching (Secondary)
ED 170a Critical Perspectives in Urban Education
SOC 104a Sociology of Education

For Elementary Teacher Education: ED 100a Exploring Teaching (Elementary and Preschool)
PSYC 33a Developmental Psychology

For Secondary Teacher Education: ED 100b Exploring Teaching (Secondary)
PSYC 36b Adolescence and the Transition to Maturity

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The teacher education minor provides preparation for teaching in preschool, elementary, and secondary schools. Minors who successfully complete the Brandeis teacher education program and pass the required Massachusetts teaching tests will earn an initial teaching license. More than forty states are part of the Interstate Compact which recognizes this license. Students who wish to teach should consider their choice of major with care and are urged to consult with an education program faculty advisor early in their Brandeis career. Students who wish to teach at the elementary level will ultimately need to demonstrate satisfactory knowledge of all subject areas that are at the foundation of the elementary school curriculum. Those who wish to teach at the secondary level should major in the discipline they intend to teach.

The education studies major is designed for students interested in the social, historical, and cultural contexts of education and the role of education in shaping policy, practice, learning, and identity. This major encourages students to think critically about such questions as: How do various political, economic, historical, psychological, and social forces shape education and public expectations for school? What does school teach us about society? How do K-12 schooling and higher education shape individual and communal identities and life opportunities? How can we better understand and guide learning in and out of school? What kinds of learning, schools, and teachers do young people need and deserve? The education studies major requires that students successfully complete nine courses, including ED155b, one other core course, and, in the senior year, ED165a, the capstone research course.

The education studies minor is designed for students interested in education policy, research, and history. The minor’s interdisciplinary approach will enable students to examine the impact of political, historical, psychological, economic and social forces that shape education and public expectations for schools.

English

Course of Study: Major, Minor
Visit the English website
Find the Undergraduate Advising Head

Career advice for a major in English

Recommended courses: ENG 1a Introduction to Literary Studies
ENG 6a The American Renaissance
ENG 10b Poetry: A Basic Course
ENG 11a Close Reading: Theory and Practice
ENG 18a Irish Literature, from the Peasantry to the Pogues
ENG 18b Writing the Holocaust
ENG 27b Classic Hollywood Cinema
ENG 28b Queer Readings
ENG 33a Shakespeare
ENG 38a Fantasy Worlds: From Lilliput and Middle Earth to LARPs
ENG 38b Race, Region, and Religion in the Twentieth Century South
ENG 50a Love Poetry from Sappho to Neruda
ENG 60a Storytelling Performance
ENG 80a Black Looks: The Promise and Perils of Photography

Environmental Studies

Course of Study: Major, Minor
Visit the Environmental Studies website
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Career advice for a major in Environmental Studies

Recommended first course: ENVS 2a Fundamentals of Environmental Challenges

Other recommended courses: BIOL 16a Evolution and Biodiversity

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The Environmental Studies program equips students to address the profound challenges facing our global environment. It combines the academic excellence and rigor of Brandeis coursework, faculty, and teaching across the disciplines of the natural and social sciences, with considerable hands-on, experiential learning opportunities. The program also features two immersive, experiential semester-long programs, the Environmental Field Semester and the Environmental Health and Justice Semester.

Environmental Studies also offers credit-bearing, individually tailored internships to students in an extensive network of government, public interest, and industry related jobs in the Boston area and beyond, working alongside environmental professionals in the field. Our study abroad partners also offer a range of experiences for students around the globe. Environmental Studies students learn research, report-writing, oral communication, mapping, website development and problem-solving skills that prepare them for their later work and studies — whether or not they pursue a career in an environmental field.

European Cultural Studies

Course of Study: Major
Visit the European Cultural Studies website
Find the Undergraduate Advising Head

Career advice for a minor in European Cultural Studies

Recommended first course: ECS 100a European Cultural Studies Proseminar: Modernism

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Feeling intellectually adventurous? European Cultural Studies (ECS) is for students who want to explore the interrelationships of literature with the fine arts, history, music, philosophy, and politics. Many ECS students study abroad to experience the cultures they are interested in first hand. ECS majors have gone on to graduate school, law school, business school, and advanced programs in international studies.

Film, Television and Interactive Media

Course of Study: Major, Minor
Visit the Film, Television and Interactive Media website
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Career advice for a major in Film, Television and Interactive Media

Recommended first course: FILM 100a Introduction to the Moving Image

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Gain insight into motion picture media through a major or minor in film studies. This curriculum provides students with knowledge about the dominant medium of our age— the moving image. Students develop an informed background in motion picture history, cinematic style, and a critical appreciation of the cultural meanings of film. The minor in film studies complements a range of disciplines including American studies, English, history, politics, sociology, fine arts, theater arts, and German, Russian, Asian languages and literature.

French and Francophone Studies

Course of Study: Major, Minor
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Career advice for a major in French and Francophone Studies

Recommended first courses: FREN 10a Beginning French (or higher level by placement)
FREN 20b Continuing French (or higher level by placement)
FREN 32a Intermediate French: Conversation (or higher level by placement)
FREN 104b Advanced Language Skills through Culture (or higher level by placement)
FREN 105a France Today: French Conversation (or higher level by placement)
FREN 106b The Art of Composition

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As Michel de Montaigne wrote, "Learning to speak, read, write, and think in a new language teaches us to knock off our rough corners by rubbing our minds against other people's." The French and Francophone Studies program puts Montaigne's advice to good use by allowing students to study the development of French and Francophone culture throughout the world.

In French and Francophone Studies, students pursue their interests in French language, as well as in French and Francophone literature, film, and culture while learning to express themselves clearly and effectively when they speak and write. Students develop strong analytical and interpretive skills and explored the historical depth and geographical breadth of literary and cultural expression in French. They also enhance their sensitivity to cultural difference, and deepen their understanding of the linguistic, cultural, and political complexities of the French-speaking world in Europe, North America, Africa, and the Caribbean.

Placement Guidelines

  • Students who have never studied French before or who have studied French for less than one semester should state how much French they have studied and which section of FREN 10a they prefer in an email to Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) who will send them a consent code.
  • Students who have studied French but not at Brandeis OR students who scored below 620 on the French SAT II exam, below 3 on the French AP exam, below 5 on the International Baccalaureate Higher Levels exam, or who took the IB Standard Levels exam should email Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) for on-line access to the French placement test (valid for one year). After completion of the test and the questionnaire that follows, Professor Harder will provide a consent code for a specific section of the appropriate language course.
  • Students who scored 3 on the French AP exam, are not required to take the placement test; however they must email their standardized exam score to Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) in order to receive a consent code for FREN 32a.
  • Students who scored 620–710 on the French SAT II exam, 4 on the French AP exam, or 5 on the International Baccalaureate Higher Levels exam should email their standardized exam score to Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) to receive a consent code for FREN 105a.
  • Students who scored 720 or above on the French SAT II exam, 5 on the French AP exam, 6 or higher on the International Baccalaureate Higher Levels exam should email their standardized exam score to Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) to receive a consent code for FREN 106b.
German Studies

Course of Study: Major, Minor
Visit the German Studies website
Find the Undergraduate Advising Head

Career advice for a major in German Studies

Recommended first courses: GER 10a Beginning German (or higher level by placement)
GER 30a Intermediate German (or higher level by placement)
GER 105a Writing on the Wall: Literature, the Arts, and the Fall of the Wall
ECS 100a European Cultural Studies Proseminar: Modernism

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German has always been one of the prime languages of international scholarship, and the reunification of Germany has reinvigorated European and indeed worldwide importance. German majors have gone on to graduate school in German literature to prepare for a career of teaching and research and many have continued on to professional school in law, medicine, or business. Some have entered government work, have found employment with publishing companies or business firms with international connections. We offer a major and a minor in German. Our department is also part of the major in European Cultural Studies (ECS).

All students who wish to enroll in a higher level course than GER 10a are required to take a placement exam administered during the first full week of instruction.

Health: Science, Society, and Policy

Course of Study: Major, Minor
Visit the Health: Science, Society, and Policy website
Find the Undergraduate Advising Head

Career advice for a major in Health: Science, Society, and Policy

Recommended first courses: BIOL 14a Genetics and Genomics
BIOL 15b Cells and Organisms
BIOL 16a Evolution and Biodiversity
HS 104b American Health Care
SOC 189a Sociology of Body and Health

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Health: Science, Society and Policy (HSSP) is an interdisciplinary undergraduate program that draws from three of the major strengths of Brandeis: the life sciences, the social sciences of health, and the health policy of the Heller School. There are few programs like HSSP in the country; the emphasis is studying multiple perspectives on health and health care in the United States and throughout the world.. The many disciplines of HSSP contribute to our current understanding of human health and disease. This program will help students understand the biological underpinnings of health, illness and disability, as well as their social, political, legal and economic dimensions. Majors enhance their knowledge with a "hands on" experience, for example, in an internship (in a health care delivery, public health, or advocacy organization), a laboratory (studying the biological basis of health, behavior, or disease), or a field-based research project or thesis (investigating aspects of health or illness in a social context).

Students may choose to earn a degree in HSSP as either a Bachelor of Arts (BA) or a Bachelor of Science (BS). Students may also choose a HSSP Minor.

By undertaking this broad, interdisciplinary study of health, students prepare themselves for a variety of educational and professional opportunities. Graduates of HSSP will go on to careers in the fields of medicine, dentistry, public health, clinical therapy, social work, genetic counseling, biomedical research, law, social policy, and public service, among many others.

Hispanic Studies

Course of Study: Major, Minor
Find the Undergraduate Advising Head

Career advice for a major in Hispanic Studies

Recommended first courses: HISP 10a Beginning Spanish (or higher level by placement)
HISP 20b Continuing Spanish (or higher level by placement)
HISP 32a Intermediate Spanish: Conversation (or higher level by placement)
HISP 34a Intermediate Spanish: Topics in Hispanic Culture (or higher level by placement)
HISP 104b Peoples, Ideas, and Language of the Hispanic World (or higher level by placement)
HISP 105a Spanish Conversation and Grammar (or higher level by placement)
HISP 106b Spanish Composition, Grammar, and Stylistics

Other recommended courses: HISP 108a Spanish for Heritage Speakers
HISP 109b Introduction to Modern Spanish Cultural Studies
HISP 111b Introduction to Latin American Literature and Culture
HISP 196a Topics in Latina/o Literature and Culture

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Hispanic Studies at Brandeis focuses on the Spanish language, and much more. Students improve their Spanish-language skills in the courses they take. But language is also the matter of politics, advertising, media, and social communication. Students, therefore, engage in the analysis of cultural artifacts and artistic movements as they learn more about language and their own place in the world. Study abroad for a semester or a year may play an important part in students’ academic careers and personal growth.

Majors and minors in Hispanic Studies are prepared to pursue careers in a wide range of fields where effective communication and intercultural critical thinking are essential, including those in which they will have direct contact with Spanish speakers and/or Hispanic cultures, both in this country and globally.

Placement Guidelines

  • Students who have never studied Spanish before or who have studied Spanish for less than one semester should state how much Spanish they have studied and which section of HISP 10a they prefer in an email to Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) who will send them a consent code.
  • Students who have studied Spanish but not at Brandeis OR students who scored below 620 on the Spanish SAT II exam, below 3 on the Spanish AP exam, below 5 on the International Baccalaureate Higher Levels Exam, or who took the IB Standard Levels exam should email Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) for on-line access to the Spanish placement test (valid for one year). After completion of the test and the questionnaire that follows, Professor Harder will provide a consent code for a specific section of the appropriate language course.
  • Students who earned a 3 on the Spanish AP exam, are not required to take the placement test; however they must email their standardized exam score to Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) in order to receive a consent code for a 30-level course.
  • Students who scored 620–710 on the Spanish SAT II exam, 4 on the Spanish AP exam, or 5 on the International Baccalaureate Higher Levels Exam should email their standardized exam score to Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) to receive a consent code for HISP 105a.
  • Students who scored 720 or above on the Spanish SAT II exam, 5 on the Spanish AP exam, 6 or higher on the International Baccalaureate Higher Levels exam should email their standardized exam score to Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) to receive a consent code for HISP 106b.
  • Heritage speakers (those who grew up speaking Spanish) should describe their language background in an email to Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) who will give them additional information.
History

Course of Study: Major, Minor
Visit the History website
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Career advice for a major in History

Recommended first course: HIST 10a Not Even Past: History for the Global Citizen

Other recommended courses: HIST 51a History of the United States: 1607-1865
HIST 80a Introduction to East Asian Civilization

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The History Department offers a range of courses - listed below - designed to introduce students to the history of different world regions. We would especially encourage students interested in History to consider History 10a, "Not Even Past: History for the Global Citizen," a course that focuses on different ways of studying history and of understanding the past within an ongoing dialogue with the present.

History of Ideas

Course of Study: Minor
Visit the History of Ideas website
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Career advice for a minor in History of Ideas

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To understand the significance of our beliefs and commitments, we need to trace their sources and their history. The History of Ideas program proposes to provide students with the historical background of the issues and the values that have shaped their interests. It is intended to provide students with the skills, the knowledge, the guidance, and the freedom to construct a focused and rigorous course of study—one that explores the historical transformation of a set of ideas and institutions across several traditional disciplines.

International and Global Studies

Course of Study: Major, Minor
Visit the International and Global Studies website
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Career advice for a major in International and Global Studies

Recommended first course: IGS 10a Introduction to International and Global Studies

Other recommended courses: ANTH 1a Introduction to the Comparative Study of Human Societies
IGS 8a Economic Principles and Globalization
POL 15a Introduction to International Relations

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Understand the complex processes of globalization that affect politics, economics, culture, society, the environment, and many other facets of our lives. International and Global Studies (IGS) students take four core courses and then two classes from each of three areas: Global Media, Culture, and the Arts; Global Governance, Conflict, and Responsibility and Global Economy, Health, and Environment.

Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies

Course of Study: Major, Minor
Visit the Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies website
Find the Undergraduate Advising Head

Career advice for a major in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies

Recommended first courses: IMES 104a Islam: Civilization and Institutions
ARBC 10a Beginning Arabic I
HBRW 10a Beginning Hebrew

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The Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies Program is an interdisciplinary curriculum organized and taught by faculty in the Departments of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies (NEJS), Politics, Sociology, Anthropology, Economics, and African Studies. Designed to provide a strong foundation in Middle Eastern studies with a specialized knowledge of Islam, the program provides unique opportunities to examine current geopolitical events and develop a deep understanding of religion, culture, and society in the Arab World, Turkey, Iran, and Israel. With a solid training in language, history, political theory and praxis, and the ideals and practices of Islam, the major is especially appropriate for students wishing to pursue graduate work in the fields of Middle Eastern Studies and Islamic Studies, and provides a solid foundation for students who wish to pursue careers dealing directly or indirectly with the Middle East.

Italian Studies

Course of Study: Minor, Independent Interdisciplinary Major (IIM)
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Career advice for a major in Italian Studies

Recommended first courses: ITAL 10a Beginning Italian (or higher level by placement)
ITAL 20b Continuing Italian (or higher level by placement)
ITAL 30a Intermediate Italian (or higher level by placement)
ITAL 105a Italian Conversation and Composition (or higher level by placement)
ITAL 106a Advanced Italian through Narrative, Film,and Other Media

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Brandeis offers students the opportunity to focus on the cultural heritage of Italy from the inception of the Italian language to the present day. The study of Italy's language and creative achievements enables students to explore this culture in depth in preparation for study abroad, graduate work, or related opportunities in the workplace.

Italian studies provides a minor and an independent major (through an Independent Interdisciplinary Major or IIM) for those who wish to extend their study of Italian beyond language and culture to areas of Italian literature, history, film, art history, and music. The study of Italian within a variety of cultural contexts enables students to deepen their understanding of Italian culture beyond the boundaries of a single time frame, region, gender, genre, or academic discipline.

Students in the program work closely with an adviser to develop an individualized plan of study that balances the exploration of a broad range of topics and sectors with a focus on a single discipline or cultural period.

Placement Guidelines

  • Students who have never studied Italian before or who have studied Italian for less than one semester should state how much Italian they have studied in an email to Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) who will give them further instructions.
  • Students who have studied Italian but not at Brandeis OR students who scored below 620 on the Italian SAT II exam, below 3 on the Italian AP exam, below 5 on the International Baccalaureate Higher Levels Exam, or who took the IB Standard Levels exam should email Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) for on-line access to the French placement test (valid for one year). After completion of the test and the questionnaire that follows, Professor Harder will provide a consent code for a specific section of the appropriate language course.
  • Students who earned a 3 on the Italian AP exam, are not required to take the placement test; however they must email their standardized exam score to Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) in order to receive a consent code for a 30-level course.
  • Students who scored 620–710 on the Italian SAT II exam, 4 on the Italian AP exam, or 5 on the International Baccalaureate Higher Levels Exam are not required to take the placement test; however they should email their standardized exam score to Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) to receive a consent code for ITAL 105a or ITAL 106a or for further options.
  • Students who scored 720 or above on the Italian SAT II exam, 5 on the Italian AP exam, 6 or higher on the International Baccalaureate Higher Levels Exam are not required to take the placement test; however they should email their standardized exam score to Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) who will give them further instructions.
Journalism

Course of Study: Minor
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Career advice for a minor in Journalism

Recommended first courses: JOUR 104a Political Packaging in America
JOUR 138b The Contemporary World in Print

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The Brandeis University Journalism Program examines the place of the media in the American--and more broadly speaking, the global--experience. The program offers students a unique, liberal-arts approach to the study of journalism. A diverse faculty of scholars and journalism professionals teach students about the role of the media in domestic and international affairs and train students in the skills necessary for the accomplished practice of journalism. In class and in professional environments, students wrestle with the challenges and responsibilities of communicating the essence of issues and world events in both print and broadcast journalism.

Korean

Faculty contact: Eun-Jo Lee 781-736-3358 email: elee2395@brandeis.edu

Recommended courses: KOR 10a Beginning Korean (or higher level by placement)
KOR 30a Intermediate Korean (or higher level by placement)

Language and Linguistics

Course of Study: Major, Minor
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Career advice for a major in Language and Linguistics

Courses that may be taken without prior study of linguistics: LING 100a Introduction to Linguistics
LING 120b Syntactic Theory
LING 160b Mathematical Methods in Linguistics

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Although language is involved in nearly every aspect of the human experience, most of us know surprisingly little about how languages work.

Linguistics takes a scientific approach to the workings and use of human languages, using data from interviewing speakers of various languages, searching linguistic corpora and running carefully designed experiments.

The language and linguistics program at Brandeis offers an in-depth study of human language, concentrating on the core sub-fields of linguistics, examining linguistic structure in terms of sound systems (phonetics and phonology), word-building (morphology), sentence-building (syntax), and language meaning (semantics and pragmatics).

The major prepares students for jobs or graduate study in fields ranging from speech recognition, artificial intelligence, speech pathology and language teaching to publishing and writing, along with M.A. or Ph.D. work in linguistics itself.

Incoming students interested in linguistics should take Introduction to Linguistics (LING 100a) in the fall, if at all possible. The course can be taken in later years if it doesn't fit a student's first year schedule, but the course introduces the core concepts of the field---and is a prerequisite for many other linguistics courses.

Latin American and Latino Studies

Course of Study: Major, Minor
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Career advice for a major in Latin American and Latino Studies

Recommended first course: LALS 100a Seminar: Topics in Latin American and Latino Studies
Fall 2017: AAAS 125b Caribbean Women and Globalization: Sexuality, Citizenship, Work counts for LALS 100a

Other recommended courses: HISP 182a Narco Cultures in Latin America and the United States

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The Latin American and Latino Studies Program offers an interdisciplinary approach to understanding South America, Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, and the Latin American diaspora in the United States. To have a first hand experience of the subject, students are encouraged to go abroad and study in Latin America for a semester.

Legal Studies

Course of Study: Minor
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Career advice for a minor in Legal Studies

Recommended first course: LGLS 10a Introduction to Law

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Legal Studies is a flexible program that includes law-related courses drawn from many different departments in addition to its own courses and seminars on a wide range of legal topics. Individual courses are open to students from all fields, including the sciences and medicine, as well as humanities, social sciences, and creative arts. Students can minor, but not major, in Legal Studies by completing the program requirements of five courses and a research-based internship or an approved law-related thesis.

Mathematics

Course of Study: Major, Minor
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Career advice for a major in Mathematics

Recommended first course: MATH 5a Precalculus Mathematics or MATH 10a Techniques of Calculus (a) (or higher level by placement)

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Mathematics is central to the natural sciences, to ecological issues, to economics, and to our technical society. Since mathematics courses build upon earlier courses, it is extremely important that students place themselves at the correct level. Students who place themselves in too advanced a course usually have difficulty as the semester progresses. Students with AP credit in mathematics should take the placement exam.

Students who plan to enroll in precalculus (MATH 5a), single variable calculus (MATH 10a or 10b) or an intermediate course like MATH 15a, 20a or 22a should take the mathematics placement exam before enrolling.

Students who place out of calculus may take MATH 15a, MATH 20a or MATH 22a. Course descriptions are given below. MATH 15a and 20a are offered every semester and can be taken in any order. Students trying to decide between MATH 15a/20a and MATH 22a should take the MATH 22a placement exam. Both placement exams can be found at www.brandeis.edu/registrar/newstudent/testing.html.

Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Course of Study: Minor
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The Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program provides students with a broad introduction to the development of Western civilization from the end of antiquity to the 17th century, as well as the chance to dig deeply into some aspect of the period in their Capstone Project. Faculty from a variety of disciplines offer courses that provide an interdisciplinary perspective on the formation of early modern Europe.

In order to develop a multifaceted picture of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, all students select one of the core courses in history, and then are encouraged to explore other disciplinary perspectives provided by various national literatures, the arts and philosophy. Since each student tailors the choice of electives to their interests, this program offers a useful complement to many concentrations, and serves as a good foundation for graduate study in a variety of fields.

Music

Course of Study: Major, Minor
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Career advice for a major in Music

Recommended first courses: MUS 101a Theory and Musicianship I: Part 1
MUS 102a Theory and Musicianship Lab I: Part 1

First-year students who may be considering a major or minor in Music should plan to take theory courses appropriate to their level by enrolling initially in Theory and Musicianship I (MUS 101a) and Theory and Musicianship Lab I (MUS 102a). A placement exam, given on the first day of class, ensures that students are enrolled in the appropriate level of music theory.

Other recommended courses: AMST/MUS 38a American Music: From Psalms to Hip Hop
MUS 1a Exploring Western Music
MUS 5a The Beginner's Toolbox: Fundamentals of Music Notation and Performance

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The Music Department believes in uniting music making with intellectual inquiry by giving students the opportunity to experience music as both scholarship and a process of creation and performance.

The curriculum and repertoire explore the connection between the art of the past and the present by seeking new interpretive meanings to classical works; creating and experiencing new music inspired by the visionaries who preceded us; exploring western and non-western musical traditions; and understanding music as a cultural phenomenon.

Music Performance Courses
There is a long tradition and a strong emphasis on performance in the music department. First-year students, especially potential majors, are encouraged to enroll in Private Lessons: Instrumentalists (MUS 111a and b) or Private Lessons: Voice (112a and b). Placement auditions for teacher assignments are held at the beginning of the semester. The department also extends a warm invitation to all students to register for participation in the performing ensembles: Early Music Ensemble (MUS 80), Chamber Choir (MUS 81), University Chorus (MUS 82), Jazz Ensemble (MUS 83), Orchestra (MUS 84), Wind Ensemble MUS 85), Improv Collective (MUS 86), Music and Dance from Ghana (MUS 87), and Chamber Music (MUS 116).

Near Eastern and Judaic Studies

Course of Study: Major, Minor
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Career advice for a major in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies

Recommended first courses: NEJS 5a The History of Judaism
ARBC 10a Beginning Arabic I

HBRW 10a Beginning Hebrew
YDSH 10a Beginning Yiddish
IMES 104a Islam, Civilization and Institutions

Other recommended courses: FYS 18a Understanding Evil and Human Destiny
NEJS 132b Against the Apocalypse: Jewish Responses to the Holocaust
NEJS 141a Modern History of East European Jewry
NEJS 152a Jerusalem: Holy and Contested
NEJS 155a Maimonides: A Jewish Thinker in the Islamic World
NEJS 183b Global Jewish Literature
NEJS 184b Disability in Israeli Literature, Film, and the Arts
NEJS 186a Introduction to the Qur’an
NEJS 195a Muhammad: From Early Muslim Accounts to Modern Biographies

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The Department of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies (NEJS) is home to a strong and diverse international faculty whose members research the Bible and ancient Near East, Jewish civilization from its beginnings through historical and contemporary times, Israel studies, Rabbinic Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Our classes are taught on many levels, in disciplines including textual and literary studies, history, social sciences, intellectual history and philosophy, religion and the arts.

Neuroscience

Course of Study: Major
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Career advice for a major in Neuroscience

Recommended first courses: BIOL 14a Genetics and Genomics
BIOL 15b Cells and Organisms
Either CHEM 11a General Chemistry I and CHEM 18a General Chemistry Laboratory I or CHEM 15a Honors General Chemistry I and CHEM 19a Honors General Chemistry Laboratory I
NPSY 11b Introduction to Behavioral Neuroscience

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Neuroscience is an interdisciplinary study of the neural mechanisms involved in the control of human and animal behavior. It combines a strong foundation in basic science with more specialized courses in neurobiology and psychology. The course requirements overlap with those recommended for admissions to medical school and graduate programs in biology, neuroscience, and neuropsychology. Therefore, the major is especially appropriate for students wishing to pursue graduate school in medicine, neurobiology, cognitive neuroscience, or neuro-modeling.

Peace, Conflict, and Coexistence Studies

Course of Study: Minor
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Career advice for a minor in Peace, Conflict, and Coexistence Studies

Recommended first course: SOC 119a Deconstructing War, Building Peace

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Since the end of World War II, peace studies has emerged as an interdisciplinary area of inquiry that draws on social science, the humanities, the creative arts and science in an effort to understand reasons for war and ways to resolve conflicts without violence.

Since the late 1980s, the focus of Brandeis' Peace, Conflict and Coexistence Studies Program (PAX) has shifted from the Cold War and the nuclear threat to understanding how conflicts can be resolved nonviolently instead of violently — whether the conflicts are international, among groups and individuals, or even within the self. This emphasis supplements and intersects with the larger goal of ending war altogether.

Our students examine the many meanings of "security," study the nature of power and political participation, consider contrasts between war culture and peace culture, recognize differences between positive peace and negative peace, investigate the relationship between inner peace and outer peace, see the role the arts can play in analyzing war and promoting peace, and explore ways of addressing conflicts

Philosophy

Course of Study: Major, Minor
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Career advice for a major in Philosophy

Recommended first courses: PHIL 1a Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 6a Introduction to Symbolic Logic
PHIL 17a Introduction to Ethics

Other recommended courses: PHIL 24a Philosophy of Religion

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In the course of our daily lives we take the ideas of time, language, knowledge, and our own identity for granted. Philosophy seeks to push the understanding of the ideas that are fundamental to all the other disciplines taught at Brandeis University— the sciences, social sciences, humanities, and the arts.

Physical Education

Recommended courses: PE 14a Yoga
PE 27a Keeping Stress in Check
PE 44a First Year Experience
PE 47a Total Body Training

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Movement and activity are basic functions necessary for the human body to grow, develop, and maintain health. Realizing that good health is largely self-controlled, the physical education department's curriculum focuses on fitness, dance, and lifetime sports to encourage lifestyle changes in its students.

Students should complete the physical education requirement by the end of their sophomore year. A student unable to pass the fitness test should enroll in a course in the Personal Fitness Group.

Physics

Course of Study: Major, Minor
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Career advice for a major in Physics

Recommended first courses: MATH 10a Techniques of Calculus (a)
PHYS 11a Introductory Physics I
PHYS 15a Advanced Introductory Physics I
PHYS 19a Physics Laboratory I

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Students majoring in physics go on to graduate studies in physics, electrical engineering, and medicine, or seek entry level industrial/technical employment. For students considering majoring in physics, it is important to meet with the physics department undergraduate advisor as soon as you arrive in the fall to discuss the choice of your first classes.

If you received score(s) on either AP Physics test that entitle you to credit toward graduation and credit toward the physics major (see the AP chart in the University Bulletin), you are eligible to enroll in the fall semester in PHYS 20a. Note that PHYS 11a, 15a and PHYS 20a all meet at the same time, so if you find that your initial choice was wrong, it is easy to change classes. However, we advise even students with excellent preparation in physics and mathematics to take PHYS 15a and 15b, as the AP courses do not cover the material in sufficient depth, and have no laboratory component. You should consult with UAH Professor Baskaran if you are contemplating going straight into PHYS 20a.

Politics

Course of Study: Major, Minor
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Career advice for a major in Politics

Recommended first courses: POL 10a Introduction to Political Theory
POL 15a Introduction to International Relations

Other recommended courses: POL 113b The American Presidency

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Interested in a career in governmental and nongovernmental public service, policy analysis, journalism, law, and business, or in post-graduate work in political science? The politics department familiarizes students with the ways others have engaged important issues, from the classical philosophers whose works shape the Western political tradition, to the modern political theorists and practitioners who shape the politics of these issues.

There is consistency with the Brandeis emphasis on critical reading, thinking, and writing skills in all of our undergraduate courses. In our seminars we seek to develop our students’ abilities to articulate reasoned arguments in support of their views before an audience of their peers.

Psychology

Course of Study: Major
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What to do with a major in Psychology

Recommended first course: PSYC 10a Introduction to Psychology

Other recommended courses: PSYC 2a Psychological and Socio-Cultural Perspectives on Health
Does not meet the requirements for the major in Psychology, but pre-health students may find it a useful way to prepare for MCAT exams. This course is taught online by Brandeis faculty.

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The Department of Psychology offers students the opportunity to establish a strong scientific and research foundation in psychology, which prepares them to be thoughtful and discerning problem solvers. The program examines the most up-to-date and comprehensive psychological research and theory and provides opportunities for direct involvement in its application to clinical, mental-health, business, educational, and other settings.

Our faculty conducts research in diverse areas including cognitive science, normal and abnormal development, health, culture, social interaction, spatial orientation, neurological bases of sensation, perception, memory, emotion, life-span development and aging, and effects of brain damage.

Religious Studies

Course of Study: Minor
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Recommended first course: REL 107a Introduction to World Religions

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Deepen your understanding of religion and its manifestations through different methodologies and disciplines with the Religious Studies Program. The program offers courses in religious thought, ritual, culture, institutions, spirituality, and sacred texts, often in historical and comparative contexts.

Brandeis, with its commitment to the wide range of religious and ethnic backgrounds in its student body, provides a supportive context for examining religion with open-minded curiosity and sympathetic understanding.

Russian Studies

Course of Study: Major, Minor
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Career advice for a major in Russian Studies

Recommended first courses: RUS 10a Beginning Russian I (or higher level by placement)
RUS 30a Intermediate Russian I (or higher level by placement)

Other recommended courses: RECS 148a Russian Drama: Text and Performance

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We are a small, but vibrant program which offers a number of outstanding courses on Russian literature (taught in English) and a full three-year language curriculum. Our literature expertise is in the 19th- and 20th-century Russian novel and in Russian poetry. Language courses focus on developing all four skills: speaking, listening, writing and reading, with special focus on speaking and oral comprehension. Our language courses are intensive and fast-paced which allows students to achieve significant proficiency after only two years of language study. By the fourth semester (RUS 40b) students are able to handle the class instructed entirely in Russian.

Our program also offers special opportunities for Russian bilinguals to acquire literacy in Cyrillic and to develop their language skills. Please contact Language Program Director Irina Dubinina (idubinin@brandeis.edu) for more information about these opportunities.

Sculpture
Sexuality and Queer Studies

Course of Study: Minor
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Recommended first course: SQS 6b Sexuality and Queer Studies

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The Sexuality and Queer Studies (SQS) minor can be earned within the Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies program. Across the SQS curriculum, students may study the relation of sexuality and gender; develop understanding of non-heteronormative genders (including gender non-conforming, intersex, transgender, transsexual, and genderqueer individuals and collectives); study gender and sexuality in relation to heterosexual as well as LGBTIAQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, asexual, and queer) persons; explore discrimination toward non-normative genders and sexualities and historical struggles for rights and legal representation; and analyze the normative function of all identity categories.

Social Justice and Social Policy

Course of Study: Minor
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Career advice for a minor in Social Justice and Social Policy

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The Social Justice and Social Policy Program includes courses that deal with problems of social equity as well as courses that approach social justice from historical, philosophical, and comparative perspectives. It examines the connection between social values and practical policies, and is intended to "center" justice and policy interests associated with virtually any field of study at Brandeis. The program provides grounding in foundational frameworks associated with justice and policy, with particular emphasis on the dynamics of discrimination and inequality, diversity and difference, historical and comparative analyses, and social policy approaches to a wide range of social problems.

Sociology

Course of Study: Major
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Career advice for a major in Sociology

Recommended first course: SOC 1a Order and Change in Society

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Acquire the skills for understanding a broad array of institutions and cultures, from the everyday level of interpersonal and community interaction to large-scale political and social systems and public policies. The sociology department engages students as active learners while encouraging them to develop knowledge that can make a difference in the world, including the potential for leadership development and action for social justice.

A degree in Sociology prepares students for a wide array of careers in human services, education, law, health, public service, and social change organizations.

South Asian Studies

Course of Study: Minor
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Recommended first course: SAS 100a India and Pakistan: Understanding South Asia

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The South Asian Studies program provides a minor (open to students in any major) for those who wish to structure their studies of South Asia or the South Asian diaspora. The minor offers an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the literatures, histories, societies, cultures, religions, arts and contemporary importance of South Asia and diasporic South Asian communities. South Asia, one of the world’s most populous and significant regions, includes the modern nations of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, and in certain contexts Afghanistan, Maldives, Myanmar and Tibet. Students completing the minor will come away with a strong understanding of the intellectual, cultural, political, economic and social developments at several key periods in South Asia’s history and in the contemporary era.

Studio Art
Theater Arts

Course of Study: Major, Minor
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Career advice for a major in Theater Arts

Recommended first courses: THA 10a Theater as Performance
THA 11a Theater Texts and Theory I

Other recommended courses: THA 35a The Audition
THA 40a The Art of the Visual Narrative

Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Course of Study: Major, Minor
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Career advice for a major in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Recommended first course: WMGS 5a Women, Genders, and Sexualities

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Women’s, gender, and sexuality studies draws on the humanities, arts, social and biological sciences to explore the broad range of intellectual questions raised by the social positions of women. The curriculum brings students into contact with the extensive research on women, gender, and feminism that has burgeoned during the past thirty years as well as with historical and cross-cultural knowledge that recognizes the intersections of gender with race, class, religion, sexuality, ethnicity, age, ability, and nationality.