For More Information

Please refer to the UDR Handbook [pdf] for additional information.

Frequently Asked Questions

General

What am I required to do as a UDR?
How do I let my fellow Dept. Faculty, Staff, and Students know that I’m a UDR?
What is the UDR Council?
Which staff members in the Office of the Dean of Arts and Sciences are available to help me? When are they available?
What are some important dates to know?

Planning & Events

What kind of events/programming should I do?
How do I decide what initiatives should be planned?
I feel like I'm doing all the work. What should I do?
Faculty/staff in my department are not responsive to our ideas. What can I do?
I would like to ask the opinion of other UDRs. How do I contact them?
I have an idea of an event. Who can help me?
How do I start planning for an event? Any tips?
How do I let people know about my event?
I just completed an event! Now what?
Too few people came to my event. What can I do to get more people next time?

Funding

How do I fund my event?
How do I get reimbursed?
I've lost my receipts. Can I still be reimbursed?
Are there other sources of funding?

Advising

What is my role in advising students?
What makes a good advisor?
Are there any advising questions I shouldn't answer?
Where can I get information about advising?
How do I become an Active Listener?

Other

What are UDR Activity Reports?

General

What am I required to do as a UDR?
UDRs seek to facilitate faculty-student engagement, guide fellow students through the unique opportunities provided by their major/minor, and initiate community-building activities within their department/program.

UDRs are peer leaders and mentors who:

  • Have been selected for leadership positions with the aim of strengthening the undergraduate learning experience and community within their academic departments and programs.
  • Provide academic and career information to majors/minors and prospective students.
  • Organize meetings with students and/or group informational sessions on topics related to their program (outside speakers, alumni/career panels, internships, research opportunities).
  • Disseminate information on current department/program events, activities and other relevant happenings.
  • Serve as ambassadors for the department/program at university-wide events such as Admitted Students Day and the Academic Fair.

All UDRs have the following responsibilities, in addition to other responsibilities mutually decided upon with their department or program:

  • Serve as friendly, helpful resources and representatives for fellow majors and minors and potential majors and minors. Let majors/minors know they are available to answer advising questions.
  • Elicit feedback from majors/minors about program concerns, and then provide this information to faculty.
  • Attend a portion of one department or program meeting to discuss undergraduate issues, if desired by the department/program chair.
  • Work in collaboration to execute at least two programs or initiatives each semester. These initiatives can include providing peer advising/mentoring, organizing an alumni career panel, an internship panel, participating in a faculty search, etc.
  • Provide the Dean of Arts and Sciences office with reports on initiatives.
  • Prepare a year-end report of accomplishments and work in progress to share with incoming UDRs.
  • Participate in ongoing assessments of UDR activities.

How do I let my fellow Dept. Faculty, Staff, and Students know that I’m a UDR?

  • Meet with your fellow UDRs, department/program academic administrator and Undergraduate Advising Head (UAH).  Mutually decide upon the best way to communicate with each other, how often you will meet each semester, and discuss the use of the student email list and social media for your major/minor
  • Send an introductory email to all majors/minors.  Let them know who you are, ways in which you can advise them, what you’re planning to do, and how to contact you.
  • Draft a letter introducing yourself to the entire faculty of your program/department. Ask the academic administrator to send this letter to all faculty in your major/minor to introduce yourselves, share your plans, and to offer your assistance.
  • Ask your academic administrator to list your names, photos and profiles on the department/program website. Post your names, photos, and contact information in a very visible location in your department/program office.
  • Identify large classes and/or intro classes in your major/minor. Ask the professors of those classes for 5 minutes at the beginning or end of class to introduce yourself and get email addresses from non-majors/minors who want to receive UDR emails. Our surveys show us that many students said they learned of their UDRs and the program through introductions made in a classroom.

What is the UDR Council?

The UDR Council is comprised of current UDRs who represent departments and interdepartmental programs from across the University. The Council meets regularly to discuss UDR program activities and advise the Dean's office on new initiatives, policy changes, and other topics concerning the UDR program.

Each council member is assigned to serve as a primary liaison and mentor for a group of departments and programs. Council members are great resources for any questions that you may have about being a UDR.  Please don't hesitate to contact them.

2017-2018 UDR Council Members:
Gemma Curnin '19, WGS
Zachary Diamond, '18, PHYS
Danielle Gaskin, '18, HSSP
Emma Gutman, '18, GER
Caroline Kaye, '18, PSYC

Which staff members in the Office of the Dean of Arts and Sciences are available to help me?  When are they available?
The primary contact person is Joan Tarkulich, UDR Program Administrator.   Joan works part-time so emailing before stopping by is the best course of action for advising, help and/or reimbursements. Elaine Wong is also available for consultations.  It's always best to call or email for an appointment on her busy schedule. 

Office of the Dean of Arts & Sciences (DAS)
Bernstein-Marcus Building, Room 73-12
MS 120
brandeis.edu/das/programs/udr

Program Administrator:
Joan Tarkulich
(781) 736-2103
joantark@brandeis.edu

What are some important dates to know?

  • Fall UDR Training: Sunday, September 10, 3:30-5:00PM
  • Priority Funding Request Deadlines: October 1 (fall semester), February 15 (spring semester) 
  • UDR Activity Reports Due: October 15, December 3, February 25, April 15
  • Annual UDR Luncheon:  Tuesday, April 17, 12:00-1:00PM

Planning & Events

What kind of events/programming should I do?

UDRs have organized a wide variety of events, such as lectures, group discussions, or exhibitions.  You don’t have to do an “event”; you could provide a service (e.g. e-mail newsletters), attend faculty meetings to provide the student perspective or hold office hours to meet with and advise students. and/or employment options.

Examples of Past Initiatives

  • Create or attend pre-enrollment information/advising sessions.
  • Organize a research panel; include information/speakers on research, internship and other academic opportunities.
  • Organize a series of brown bag lunches on issues in your field of study.
  • Create a Facebook page just for your major/minor. 
  • Mediate a department issue with faculty.
  • Organize a ‘What to Do with a Major’ in your field; invite alums with a range of professions.
  • Create a department/program newsletter to distribute information on internships, research, cultural events and other department/program activities.
  • Participate in job talks and interviews for new faculty searches.
  • Send out a survey to majors/minors to learn what they most appreciate/most want to change in your department/program and present the findings at a department/program meeting.
  • Address issues surrounding curriculum change and courses; discuss recruitment ideas to attract prospective majors (e.g. letters to pre-first-years).
  • Help establish tutoring groups.
  • Lobby for new course offerings.
  • Organize a graduate school information session; invite faculty.
  • Organize an alumni career panel.
  • Plan movie nights, talent shows, and ice cream socials.
  • Plan a ‘Thinking about an Internship’ event.  Connect with the Hiatt Career Center and your UAH so you can invite students who have had internships.
  • Review and update departmental thesis guidelines to ensure these better reflect students’ experiences writing their theses. 
  • Organize theses writing sessions so students can support each other.

How do I decide what initiatives should be planned?

Critically Examine Department/Program Needs and Plan Accordingly: 

  • Meet with your academic administrator and/or UAH to review plans for the upcoming year.  Review past UDR reports and surveys for ideas.
  • Think about what you want to accomplish during each semester as a UDR and set one or two goals for yourself and the department or program. What specific information would be most useful to the department/program? What projects might you undertake?
  • What programs were well received in the past? What programs were not successful? Examine why some programs were successful and some weren’t.
  • Where do you get ideas for initiatives?  Ask other students, teachers, and staff.  Find out what people need and fulfill that need.

I feel like I’m doing all the work.  What should I do?
Talk to your co-UDR(s) and tell them how you feel about the situation.  Don’t accuse, but try to discuss the situation as a problem that you would like to have them help you solve.  Instead of saying “I feel like I’m doing all of the work and would like some help,” you could say “I feel overwhelmed by the amount of UDR work I have to do right now, and I would appreciate it if you can help with some if it so that our event is successful.”  Many times it is not that your co-UDR doesn’t want to help; they may be very busy themselves and feel like they can’t commit the time.  If you plan ahead, you can each try being responsible for a particular event/initiative, choosing a time of year when you know you can take on the work.  If you try to work out the issue with your co-UDR and still feel like there is a problem, talk to the UDR Council or the UDR Program Administrator. 

Faculty/staff in my department are not responsive to our ideas.  What can I do?
Make an appointment to talk to DAS; they can help with strategies for negotiating with your department/program.

I would like to ask the opinion of other UDRs.  How do I contact them?
If you would like to ask all of them, send a message to the UDR Program Administrator, who will then review and broadcast it to the UDR listserv.  If you would like to talk to only a particular groups (e.g., all Creative Arts UDRs, or only those from languages) you can find their names and contact information on the current UDR list.

I have an idea for an event.  Who can help me?
There are many Brandeis offices that can offer support for UDR programs.  Do not hesitate to contact them to collaboratively plan initiatives.  Please refer to the UDR Handbook for details.  Some of the departments and offices that you can collaborate with are: 

  • Academic Services
  • Conference and Event Services
  • Office of the Arts
  • Experiential Learning
  • Hiatt Career Center
  • Library Services
  • Roosevelt Fellows
  • Study Abroad Office 

How to I start planning for an event? Any tips?
Helpful Hints:

  • Plan ahead. It is very hard to get services and book on-campus space on short notice.
  • Attend a Conference and Events Services Jump Start meeting to help plan your program brandeis.edu/ces/studentevents/jumpstart.html
  • Food draws crowds so it is usually best to serve at least light refreshments.
  • Secure all required funding before incurring expenses.
  • To minimize conflicts, check University calendars when deciding on initiative dates and times.
  • Have a sign-in sheet at initiatives to collect names of students who may want to be on your distribution lists.

Planning Guide:
Initiatives can be small or large, but no matter its size, or its audience, every initiative will require planning in order for it to be successful. Create a detailed list of the tasks that needs to happen, assigning each a deadline and responsible team member.  Use the Programming Checklist (Appendix A in the UDR Handbook) as a guide to organize responsibilities and deadlines.

During the early stages of planning, consider the following: 

BRAINSTORMING

  • What are your objectives and how do they relate to your organizational mission?
  • Do you want to collaborate with UDRs from other departments and programs?
  • How many people are needed to assist with planning and day-of activities and what talents should they possess?
  • What University resources/expertise exist that could be utilized?  (i.e. Hiatt, Library Services)

SCHEDULING AND SPACE/AUDIO VISUAL REQUIREMENTS

  • Check the University calendar to avoid conflicts
  • Determine the type of venue that is best suited for the initiative (see Appendix B: Facilities Guide)
  • Are the needed technology resources obtainable?

FOOD/SUPPLIES

  • Will food be provided?  Is food the main draw?
  • Will you be using University (Sodexo) catering? Recognized student groups are welcome to bring in their own food for events. Students are also then responsible for providing any necessary supplies (i.e. forks, knives, plates, etc.)
  • Determine what other supplies are needed and from where they will be obtained.

ADVERTISING

  • What is the best way to reach your audience?
  • Prepare publicity materials 3-4 weeks in advance
  • Have consistent messaging and design

BUDGETING

  • Do you have the necessary resources? Use the sample Budget Planning Worksheet and Common Costs guides.
  • If you are applying for funding, you must contact DAS and other offices at least 2 weeks in advance.  Check in with your department BEFORE you check in with DAS for funding.

How do I let people know about my event?

You have planned your initiative - now make sure to get the word out so it will be well attended.  Some methods of publicity that can be utilized are:

  • Tabling/Ticketing Sales: Limited tabling space is available in Lower Usdan (contact the Department Coordinator in the Department of Student Activities for reservations) or in the Shapiro Campus Center on a first-come first-serve basis. If you are interested in selling or distributing tickets from the Shapiro Theater Ticket Booth, please contact the Operations Specialist in the Department of Student Activities for availability.
  • Mailboxes: If you wish to advertise to all students through a mailbox stuffing, you must obtain permission from the Department of Student Activities. Bring two samples of the flyer you plan to stuff to the office and pick up a form, which when completed and presented to the mailroom staff, will allow you to access student mailboxes.
  • Newspaper Ads: The Justice: send email to ads@thejustice.org.

The Hoot: http://brandeishoot.com/advertise/

  • WBRS FM 100.1: http://www.wbrs.org/contact/  
  • Sidewalk Chalking: Use fun and colorful chalk drawings on well-traveled pathways. Only sidewalks may be chalked. Chalking on buildings and personal or University property (i.e. buildings, cars, bus shelters, signs, etc.) is not permitted.
  • Social Media: Create a Facebook event.
  • Make announcements in class; request permission of the instructor first
  • Flyers/Posters: See the Leadership & Resource Handbook.
  • BrandeisEVENTS: Submit an Event at brandeis.edu/events/submit.html
  • DAS office will copy up to 75 flyers on colored paper for free.

I just completed an event! Now what?
Evaluate your event. Do this as soon as possible after the event so that the details are fresh in your mind. If several UDRs were involved in the planning, plan a short meeting to evaluate the event as a group. Write down notes that can be referred to when planning future events and can be utilized to complete required UDR Activity Reports.

  • Did we meet our goals/objectives with this event?
  • Did we meet our budgetary goals?
  • Did we have enough volunteers for the event?
  • What could we have done differently to make the event better/more productive?
  • Did we have enough advertising/PR for the event? Are there areas for improvement?
  • Did we execute the program in a professional manner?
  • Did we face any group conflict with this program? What was it? How was it resolved? What could we have done differently?
  • Would we bring this vendor/performer/speaker in again? Was it worth it?
  • Would we execute a similar program in the future? What changes would we make?

Too few people came to my event.  What can I do to get more people next time?
There may be many reasons, but the most common problems are the day, time, location of the event, and inadequate publicity.  The best thing you can do for future events is plan as far in advance as possible.  Check in with the department/program staff and consult campus event calendars to make sure that your event does not compete with another event for the same type of audience.  Have your event at a time of day that does not conflict with classes and is convenient.  Make sure that you adequately publicize the event by sending emails, posting flyers, and best of all, talking to as many people as possible personally and asking them to come.  Consider collaborating with one or more other department/program UDRs to encourage more students to attend (see below).

Funding

How do I fund my event?
There is no set amount of UDR funding for a particular initiative; however, funding is limited, so spending should be kept modest (i.e., snacks instead of a full dinner). Historically, the average per initiative spending has been approximately $75. Ask your department/program if they have any available funding for your initiative.  Also, if you are collaborating with another office, ask them if there are any sources of funding that they can provide.  There are also grants available from various offices (Brandeis Pluralism Alliance, Ethics Center, etc.), depending on the topic or the goal of your project, for which you can apply.

Be sure to apply for UDR funding as soon as possible.  Priority will be given to funding requests that are submitted by October 1 (fall semester) or February 15 (spring semester).  You cannot apply for funding after your initiative has occurred.

How to Request Funding
All funding requests must be submitted online.  The form should be submitted 2 weeks before your initiative. Please allow at least three days for approval notification.  Submission of the online form and approval of the funding request by the DAS Dean's Office, prior to the occurrence of the event or program, is required in order to receive reimbursement for monies spent.

Funding Timeframes
UDR approved funding expires at the end of the semester in which the event or initiative was scheduled to occur. Unused funding cannot be carried over to another event or initiative. Reimbursements for monies spent on approved initiatives must be submitted by the following deadlines:

  • Fall semester - Feb 1st
  • Spring Semester - Last day of the final examination period
  • Payments to Brandeis faculty, staff, and students for services and for the purchase of alcohol are prohibited.
  • To be reimbursed through DAS or your department, save all expense receipts. Receipts must be original and itemized. Make a copy of the receipts for your records, in case the originals get lost. Submit all required documentation shortly after the initiative is completed. Missing information can delay or prevent processing.
  • NEVER sign a contract.
  • NEVER pay or reimburse an individual (e.g. a performer, guest lecturer) yourself. You will be in violation of tax laws and the university will NOT reimburse you. 
  • Beware of hidden fees. Make sure the quoted price includes everything (fees, taxes, etc.). Avoid late and rush fees by making arrangements as far in advance as possible. 
  • Remember, Brandeis is a non-profit tax-exempt organization so if Brandeis is paying, no tax should be charged.  Be sure to inform the vendor in advance.

Helpful Info and Tips

  • Payments to Brandeis faculty, staff, and students for services and for the purchase of alcohol are prohibited.
  • To be reimbursed through DAS or your department, save all expense receipts. Receipts must be original and itemized. Make a copy of the receipts for your records, in case the originals get lost. Submit all required documentation shortly after the initiative is completed. Missing information can delay or prevent processing.
  • NEVER sign a contract.
  • NEVER pay or reimburse an individual (e.g. a performer, guest lecturer) yourself. You will be in violation of tax laws and the university will NOT reimburse you. 
  • Beware of hidden fees. Make sure the quoted price includes everything (fees, taxes, etc.). Avoid late and rush fees by making arrangements as far in advance as possible. 
  • Remember, Brandeis is a non-profit tax-exempt organization so if Brandeis is paying, no tax should be charged.  Be sure to inform the vendor in advance. 

How do I get reimbursed?
All funding requires pre-approval from the DAS office.

Important Points to Remember

  • Plan ahead.  Some purchases require up to two weeks to process.
  • Bring in or send ALL required documentation.  Missing information will delay processing.
  • Receipts for reimbursements must be original and itemized.  Make copies of the receipts.
  • NEVER sign a contract.
  • NEVER pay or reimburse an individual (e.g. a performer, guest lecturer) with your own funds. You will be in violation of tax laws and the university will NOT reimburse you. 
  • Beware of hidden fees.  Make sure the quoted price includes everything (fees, taxes, etc.), and avoid late and rush fees by making arrangements as far in advance as possible.
  • If you have any questions, contact DAS.

Payment Methods

DIRECT PAYMENT TO ON-CAMPUS VENDORS (CONFERENCE & EVENTS, COPY CENTER, ETC.)

Payments for on-campus services can be paid directly with the DAS chart string.  On-campus services have their own order forms and procedures.  Please consult with the appropriate office for further instructions.  All forms can be directed to the UDR Program Administrator or you may deliver them in person to the DAS office [Bernstein-Marcus 73-12].  Any changes to original orders should be approved by DAS.  Please be sure your name and department/program is clearly referenced on the documentation.

UNIVERSITY CREDIT CARD

Some off-campus purchases can be paid for directly with a University Credit Card. For example, if you order catered food that must be paid for in advance, you may coordinate direct payment with the UDR Program Administrator in the Dean’s Office. Original receipts must be delivered to the Dean’s office for record keeping. This option is also best if you are purchasing online supplies.

TRANSFERRING GRANT FUNDS TO ANOTHER UNIVERSITY ACCOUNT

If you would like to take advantage of this option,

  • Please notify the UDR Program Administrator via email that you plan to arrange a transfer, and then speak to Stephen Costa, budget analyst in the Office of Students and Enrollment, to initiate it. 
  • Tell him that you have funds available from the Office of the Dean of Arts and Sciences, and that they have agreed to transfer them to your club account.  If done via email, the UDR Program Administrator will supply the Office of Students and Enrollment with the DAS chart string to complete the process. 
  • Please allow two weeks for the transfer to be completed.

PAYMENT FOR CONTRACT SERVICES AND HONORARIA

All contractual agreements must be approved and signed by specific university officials. No student or staff member should ever sign a contract on behalf of the University; these regulations are designed to protect both students and the University from liabilities. If you are unsure who should sign the contract, please bring it to DAS. Honoraria, stipends, and fees for contract services are not allowed for Brandeis faculty, staff, or students (this includes students acting as DJs or performers).  Do not pay someone yourself, intending to be reimbursed later - this violates tax procedures and you will not be reimbursed.

UDRs are responsible for completing and coordinating any paperwork necessary to pay a non-employee, non-student vendor. The Resource and Leadership Handbook on the Student Activities website is an excellent tutorial on how students can pay off-campus partners.

There is often confusion about the difference between an honorarium and a contractor or consultant.

  • A contractor/consultant is an entity or person who provides a professional service on a short-term basis (e.g., musicians, coaches, etc.).  They will need to fill out documentation so that their compensation can be recorded for tax purposes.
  • An honorarium is a “token” payment for services such as an academic presentation; the fee is at the discretion of the University and is not legally required. 

REIMBURSEMENT WITH ORIGINAL RECEIPTS (FOR ALL PURCHASES NOT INCLUDED ABOVE)

All other purchases must be made by the individual and then reimbursed.  All reimbursements must be submitted by February 1 for fall initiatives or by the last day of the final examination period for spring initiatives. 

a. Reimbursements for amounts UNDER $100

  • You MUST have original receipts in order to be reimbursed. If you spend under $100, stop by the Program Administrator’s office in Bernstein-Marcus 73-12 to complete a Petty Cash Form.
  • Once the form is completed and signed, you will take it to 60 Turner Street during the Cashier’s office hours and you will receive a cash reimbursement.

b. Reimbursements for amounts OVER $99

  • You MUST have original receipts in order to be reimbursed. If you spend $100 or more, stop by the Program Administrator’s office in Bernstein-Marcus 73-12 to complete the necessary reimbursement form.
  • The Program Administrator will send the completed form and receipts to Accounts Payable.  Once Accounts Payable has processed the form, a check will sent to your mailbox. This process may take 1-2 weeks.

I’ve lost my receipts. Can I still be reimbursed?
Probably, but we cannot guarantee it.  Situations with missing paperwork are handled on a case-by-case basis.  Talk to the UDR Program Administrator about your options. 

Are there other sources of funding?
Ask your department/program if funds might be available.  Also, if you are collaborating with another office, ask them if there are any sources of funding that they can provide.  There are also grants available from various offices (Brandeis Pluralism AllianceEthics Center, etc.), depending on the topic or the goal of your project, for which you can apply. 

 

Advising

What is my role in advising students?
UDRs are considered the primary student contact for information about the specific major, minor, or program that they represent.  You should familiarize yourself with the requirements for your major/minor from the University Bulletin.  You can expect questions from current majors/minors, undeclared undergraduates, and students applying or interested in applying to Brandeis.

What makes a good advisor?

  • Someone who is approachable and has the ability to communicate with others.
  • Someone who helps other students plan a course schedule that works with the student's other commitments.
  • Someone who is willing to share their experience selecting academic paths with other students.
  • Someone who has the knowledge to answer a student's questions accurately and in an approachable and friendly manner.
  • Someone who can empathize with other students.
  • Someone who assists the professional advisor, faculty advisor, or program coordinator with advising-related activities.

Five Basic Principles of Advising:

  1. Provide accurate information.
  2. Don't make decisions for your advisee.
  3. Be a good listener.
  4. Make effective referrals.
  5. Be nice.

Are there any advising questions I shouldn’t answer?
You are not required to answer any question with which you do not feel comfortable.  However, you should be prepared to find the answer by consulting with someone else, such as the undergraduate advising head, or to refer them to another staff member of the university.  

Where can I get information about advising?
The Academic Services website is the best source for general information.  For specific questions about your major/minor, talk to your Undergraduate Advising Head.  

How do I become an Active Listener?

There are five key elements of active listening. They all help you ensure that you hear the other person, and that the other person knows you are hearing what they are saying.
1. Pay Attention: Give the speaker your undivided attention and acknowledge the message. Recognize that non-verbal communication also "speaks" loudly.

  • Maintain a comfortable amount of eye contact.
  • Put aside distracting thoughts.
  • Don't mentally prepare a rebuttal.
  • Avoid being distracted by environmental factors.
  • ‘Listen’ to the speaker's body language.
  • Refrain from side conversations when listening in a group setting.

2. Show That You're Listening: Use your own body language and gestures to convey your attention.

  • Nod occasionally.
  • Smile and use other facial expressions.
  • Note your posture and make sure it is open and inviting. Lean slightly towards the speaker to show interest.
  • Encourage the speaker to continue with small verbal comments like yes, and uh huh.

3. Provide Feedback: Our personal filters, assumptions, judgments, and beliefs can distort what we hear. As a listener, your role is to understand what is being said. This may require you to reflect what is being said and ask questions.

  • Reflect what has been said by paraphrasing. "What I'm hearing is . . ." and "Sounds like you are saying . . ." are great ways to reflect back.
  • Ask open-ended questions to clarify certain points. "What do you mean when you say . . ." "Is this what you mean?"
  • Summarize the speaker's comments periodically.

4. Defer Judgment: Interrupting is a waste of time. It frustrates the speaker and limits full understanding of the message.

  • Allow the speaker to finish; don't interrupt.

5. Respond Appropriately: Active listening is a model for respect and understanding. You are gaining information and perspective. You add nothing by marginalizing the speaker or his/her ideas or questions. Be candid, open, and honest in your response.

  • Assert your opinions respectfully.
  • Empathize with the person, try to put yourself in their shoes.

Other 

What are UDR Activity Reports?
UDR Activity Reports
Twice a semester UDRs are required to submit a UDR Activity Report that summarizes UDR initiatives that have been completed up until the due date of the report and, if applicable, any initiatives that are planned for the remainder of the semester.

These reports let us know about the valuable and impactful work that is being done by UDRs for their departments and programs.  The collected information is also used to build a catalog of UDR planning resources that can be shared with other UDRs.

Selection of UDR Recognition Prize winners will be based on information that has been submitted by UDRs in their UDR Activity Reports. Recognition prizes will be awarded once each semester.

A UDR Activity Report should be submitted for each initiative that has occurred or is planned. If more than one UDR coordinated the initiative, only one of you needs to submit a report. Please submit at least one UDR Activity Report, via an online form linked to from the UDR website, by each of the following due dates:

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

October 15

February 25

December 3

April 15 

Year-End Report
UDRs should prepare a year-end report of accomplishments and work in progress to share with their department/program incoming UDRs.