For more information about anthropology department events:

Laurel Carpenter
Brown 228
(781) 736-2210
(781) 736-2232 (fax)
lcarpent@brandeis.edu

BARS | Fall 2017

The Brandeis Anthropology Research Seminar (BARS) is a year-long seminar that meets most Friday afternoons at 2:30 p.m. in Schwartz 103 (unless otherwise noted). The series includes anthropology colloquia presented by invited guests and Brandeis anthropology faculty, alternating with workshops, reading groups and presentations by graduate students. Often we will close the seminar with an opportunity for socializing with the invited speaker and each other.

Friday, Sept. 1, 2 p.m. in Schwartz 103

Orientation for new Anthropology Graduate Students, followed by open graduate student planning session for BARS programming

Following the BARS planning session, we will adjourn to the Stein for further conversation and connections.

Friday, Sept. 8, 2 p.m. in the Faculty Club Lounge

Welcome/Welcome Back Reception for new and returning anthropology graduate students, faculty and university colleagues

After a initial period of mingling and refreshments, we will have our traditional circle of introductions.

Friday, Sept. 15

Fieldwork Debriefing

Graduate students who conducted fieldwork this summer are invited to informally talk about their experiences in this student-only session. All anthropology graduate students welcome.

Friday, Sept. 29

Strategies for Success in Writing Grants for Anthropology; GTR; Nuts & Bolts for Completing MA Degree

Presented by Professor Sarah Lamb and Senior Academic Administrator Laurel Carpenter

Friday, Oct. 6 at 2 p.m.

Workshop for Critical Inquiry and Education, Presented by Michael Jackson, Harvard University

Attendees of the Brandeis Anthropology Research Seminar are invited to visit the Workshop for Critical Inquiry and Education (WCIE) for this writing workshop featuring new work by visiting anthropologist Michael D. Jackson. The WCIE meets in the Mandel Center, room G12 at 2:00. Please visit their website for more information about this event and other upcoming speakers.

Friday, Oct. 13

Applying to Doctoral Programs in Anthropology

Open to undergraduate students and students in Brandeis master's programs. Director of Graduate Studies Sarah Lamb and Professor Charles Golden will provide insight into the graduate admissions process and tips for crafting a strong application. Topics will include choosing graduate schools, creating an effective statement of purpose, and choosing an appropriate writing sample.

Friday, Oct. 20 at 3 p.m.

Graduate Student Fieldwork Talks

Anthropology graduate students who received departmental funding for their research projects will present on their work.

Friday, Oct. 27

Hunt Lecture in Economic Anthropology presented by Daniel Goldstein

"Biometric Regulation of Immigrant Labor: From IRCA to E-Verify and Beyond"

Daniel M. Goldstein is Professor of Anthropology at Rutgers University, where he has taught since 2005. A political and legal anthropologist, Prof. Goldstein studies the global meanings and practices of security, democracy, and human rights. He is concerned with questions of law, violence, and social justice for marginalized urban people in Latin America and the United States.

Friday, Nov. 17 at 12 noon

Graduate Student Lunch with:

Brad Weiss: Professor of Anthropology, College of William & Mary

Cecilia Van Hollen: Associate Professor of Anthropology, Syracuse University

Steve Silliman: Professor of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts

Friday, Nov. 17 at 2 p.m.

Workshop for Critical Inquiry and Education, presented by Keridwen Luis, PhD '09, Brandeis University

Attendees of the Brandeis Anthropology Research Seminar are invited to visit the Workshop for Critical Inquiry and Education (WCIE) for this writing workshop featuring new work by anthropologist and faculty member Keridwen Luis. The WCIE meets in the Mandel Center, room G12 at 2:00. Please visit their website for more information about this event and other upcoming speakers.

Friday, Dec. 8

Saler Lecture in Religious Studies Presented by Bhrigupati Singh

"Psychiatric Insights from a Sufi Shrine - Forms of Spiritual
and Material Distress in Contemporary India"

Bhrigupati SinghBhrigupati Singh completed his PhD in anthropology at Johns Hopkins University in 2010 and is currently an assistant professor of anthropology at Brown, a faculty fellow at the Watson Institute, and joint associate director of the Center for Contemporary South Asia. He has published numerous articles on issues of religion, politics, media, and popular culture, and his book "Poverty and the Quest for Life: Spiritual andMaterial Striving in Rural India" (University of Chicago Press, 2015; Oxford University Press – South Asia 2015), was awarded the Joseph Elder Prize in the Indian Social Sciences and the American Academy of Religion's Award for Excellence in the study of religion (analytic-descriptive), and was a finalist for the Clifford Geertz Book Prize. He is co-editor of "The Ground Between: Anthropological Engagements with Philosophy" (Duke University Press, 2014), and serves as an associate editor of HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory. He is currently working on a book of essays on philosophical and literary concepts of vitalism and its relation to anthropological understandings of everyday life, and a monograph on urban poverty, mental health, drug addiction, and collective violence, set in the “resettlement colony” of Trilokpuri in East Delhi.