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Collaborations with the Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome


Via Omero 10-12, at the edge of the Villa Borghese


Via Appia Mapping Project

The Ancient Greek and Roman Studies Master's program has an ongoing relationship with the Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome, thanks to a generous gift from Robert and Cynthia Lepofsky. The Institute reserves two spots for our graduate students to participate in the Via Appia Mapping project. This is an archaeological field school, run by the Dutch, that aims to document and study the archaeological remains in and around the fifth mile marker of the Via Appia Antica.

Students in the field school learn the latest excavation techniques as they work in and around the monuments preserved both above and beneath ground level along the Via Appia Antica. They also learn about the rich documentary evidence about the ancient road in archives, photographs, and digital resources, and how the combination of all this evidence is contributing to making a detailed, multidisciplinary analysis of the history of the road and its surroundings. At the same time, students have a hand in developing new types of documentation and analysis, since such wide-ranging data also poses some important methodological challenges. Established recording systems hitherto employed in regional field surveys are not sufficient for the complex architectural designs of several monuments along the Via Appia Antica combined with the archival materials available for them. The field school uses professional GPS (DGPS), of course, which refines the techniques of archaeological survey and documentation of visual remains. The main strength of the project, however, is the use of new 3D spatial mapping and analysis techniques that are combined with geophysical prospection, remote sensing techniques, field survey, excavation, and archival studies.

As a result, the research project of the Royal Netherlands Institute not only offers invaluable new data on the functioning of this particular Roman consular road, but provides a new methodological framework for studying monumental archaeological landscapes that can be used in other research projects.

Our student participants stay at the Royal Netherlands Institute. The cost (for attending the excavation, instruction, and lodgings, excluding airfare, board, transportation in Rome) should be ca. 600 EUROs for 4 1/2 weeks in the field school.

International M.A. Course on Cultural Heritage, Urbanistic Interventions, and the City of Rome

Again, thanks to a generous gift from Robert and Cynthia Lepofsky, the Royal Netherlands Institute also reserves two spots for our graduate MA students in Ancient Greek and Roman Studies to participate in the Institute's annual spring international MA course, Challenging Eternity: Heritage, Urbanistic Interventions, and the City of Rome. The course offers students the opportunity to study the complex interrelations between urban development, politics, and the preservation and transformation of cultural heritage in Rome, the Eternal City. Students develop a better understanding of the historical roles that cultural heritage has within the broader framework of national and European identity construction. It is held in the first half of June each year.

Our student participants stay at the Royal Netherlands Institute. The cost for attending the course, instruction, and lodgings, excluding airfare, board, and ground transportation in Rome) should be ca. 400 EUROs for 2 weeks.

Please contact Professor Koloski-Ostrow, Chair of Classical Studies, if you are interested in either opportunity, and please feel free to visit the Royal Netherlands Institute (Koninklijk Nederlands Instituut Rome's (KNIR)) website for more information.