For More Information

Contact the Undergraduate Advising Head for 2017–18, Jerónimo Arellano.


Undergraduate Departmental Representatives (UDRs) for 2017–18 are: 


Looking for a group to study with? Check out B.U.G.S.


Want to investigate what you can do with a Hispanic Studies major/minor? Visit the Hiatt Career Center here!


CHARLAMOS

Anyone interested in informally practicing their Spanish are welcome to attend CHARLAMOS. Students attend weekly meetings to meet socially, speak Spanish, and to share ideas, music, and photos. For the schedule, please see our current events page.

If you have any questions, please contact one of the (2016-17) Co-presidents, Talia Franks (tfranks@brandeis.edu) or Lauren Cohen (lcohen18@brandeis.edu).

Please join our Charlamos Facebook Group!

----

¿Quieres charlar informalmente en español? Puedes venir y salir en cualquier momento-- pasa 10 minutos, o una hora, como prefieras. Si quieres agregar tu email al listserve de Charlamos, contactar con Talia Franks (tfranks@brandeis.edu) o Lauren Cohen (lcohen18@brandeis.edu).


Brandeis LatinX Student Organization (BLSO) Brandeis Latinx Student Organization provides social, academic, and emotional support for the Latinx community. With various educational events throughout the year, BLSO aims to enlighten all who are interested in Latinx culture, history, and current events, to provide and maintain a safe space for all Latinx students, and to promote all aspects of the Latinx culture to unite the Brandeis community. Building upon Brandeis’ legacy of social justice we seek to hold the university accountable and address the concerns and demands of our community.


Hispanic Studies

hispanic2.jpg

Gaudi construction in Barcelona, Spain.


In addition to providing students with the knowledge, skills, and cultural information that are necessary in today’s workplace, the study of Hispanic and Latino languages, literature and cultures helps to develop the critical and analytic skills needed to be an effective participant in local and national discussions. The study of the Spanish language in the context of literature, film, history, politics and popular culture will allow students to follow international events with insight, introducing new perspectives to make them informed and responsible members of the international community.

Please follow this link to:
Learning Goals for Hispanic Studies




Curriculum Overview

Hispanic Studies at Brandeis is the Spanish language, and much more. A major in Hispanic Studies allows students to wrestle with such questions as: how does artistic production allow a community to examine its origins, identity, and memory? How do literature and the arts in the Hispanic world engage with socio-economic and political history at both a local and a transnational level? How to think across cultures? What do works of the imagination say about the world in which we live that other texts and practices cannot articulate?

Hispanic Studies courses involve literature and film, art and politics, cultures and places from Spain to Latin America and the United States, from the remote past to today. Students engage in the analysis of cultural artifacts and movements as they learn more about language and their own place in the world.

(return to top)

How to Become a Major or a Minor:

Students considering a major or a minor in Hispanic Studies should complete the language requirement as soon as possible, preferably by the end of their first year at Brandeis.
  • After students complete a 30-level Spanish language course, they are advised to enroll in HISP 104b.
  • Students who scored 620–710 on the Spanish SAT II, 4 on the Spanish Advanced Placement exam, or 5 on the International Baccalaureate Higher Levels Exam are usually advised to enroll in HISP 105a.
  • Students who scored 720 or above on the Spanish SAT II exam, 5 on the Spanish AP exam, or 6 or higher on the International Baccalaureate Higher Levels Exam should enroll in HISP 106b.
  • Heritage Spanish speakers are encouraged to enroll in HISP 108a.
  • Either HISP 106b or HISP 108a is the first course in the sequence that counts toward the major or the minor in Hispanic Studies.

Once students have completed HISP 106b or HISP 108a, they begin the sequence of literature and culture courses.

Please note: many Hispanic Studies majors and minors choose to study in Spain or Latin America for all or part of their junior year. Normally, up to two full-credit Spanish or Latin American literature or film courses per semester taken abroad will count toward the Hispanic Studies major, up to a maximum of four courses total for the major and up to two courses total for the minor.

Students interested in learning more about the major or minor are encouraged to speak with the Undergraduate Advising Head in Hispanic Studies.

The major consists of nine semester courses:

A. HISP 106b (Spanish for Written Communication through Contemporary Culture) or HISP 108a (Spanish for Heritage Speakers).

B. At least one of the following: HISP 109b (Introduction to Modern Spanish Cultural Studies) or HISP 111b (Introduction to Latin American Literature and Culture), to be completed as early as possible.

C. The additional courses must be from the Hispanic Studies literature or film offerings numbered above 111, at least one of which must deal with Spanish or Latin American literature before 1900. Alternatively, taking two classes that partially cover pre-1900 texts can fulfill this requirement. No more than two of the electives may be taken in English. HECS 42b and one semester of HISP 92a (Internship and Analysis) may count as electives. Courses conducted in English include those abbreviated HECS (Hispanic and European Cultural Studies).

D. HISP 198a (Experiential Research Seminar in Literary and Cultural Studies) in the fall semester, normally, of the senior year. Those seeking departmental honors will also take HISP 99b in the spring to complete the senior thesis. Please see pdf of memo describing the senior thesis in detail here. Honors students must have maintained a 3.60 GPA in Hispanic Studies courses previous to the senior year. Honors are awarded based on cumulative excellence in all courses taken in the major, including the senior thesis.

Notes: 

  • No grade below a C- will be given credit toward the major.
  • No course taken pass/fail may count toward the major requirements.
  • Students may petition the undergraduate advising head for changes in the above program. Students wishing to receive credit toward the Hispanic Studies major for courses that are cross-listed under ECS (abbreviated HECS) will be required to do the reading and writing in Spanish.
  • Enrollment in the Hispanic Studies major must be completed by the end of the first semester of the senior year.
  • All students pursuing a Hispanic Studies major will be assigned an advisor in the department.
  • All courses are conducted in Spanish, unless otherwise noted.

(return to top)

The minor consists of five semester courses:

A. HISP 106b (Spanish for Written Communication through Contemporary Culture) or HISP 108a (Spanish for Heritage Speakers).

B. At least one of the following: HISP 109b (Introduction to Hispanic Cultural Studies) or HISP 111b (Introduction to Latin American Literature and Culture).

C. The additional courses must be from the Hispanic Studies literature or film offerings numbered above 111. No more than one of these electives may be taken in English. HECS 42b may count as an elective. Courses conducted in English include those abbreviated HECS (Hispanic and European Cultural Studies).

Notes: 

  • No grade below a C- will be given credit toward the minor.
  • No course taken pass/fail may count toward the minor requirements.
  • Enrollment in the Hispanic Studies minor must be completed by the end of the first semester of the senior year.
  • All students pursuing a Hispanic Studies minor will be assigned an advisor in the department.
  • All courses are conducted in Spanish, unless otherwise noted.

(return to top)

Areas of Special Interest

Students are encouraged to explore interdisciplinary and intercultural connections across campus. Faculty in the program are involved in different programs on campus, such as film studies, Latin American studies, women’s and gender studies, and peace, conflict, and coexistence studies. Each faculty member is happy to provide academic advising and help students form personal connections.

(return to top)

Career and Education Opportunities

Career opportunities for students who major in Hispanic studies are diverse and multifaceted. Our majors find jobs in government agencies (the FBI, the United Nations, and various offices in Washington, D.C.); as Foreign Service officers and translators; in social services and public relations in the United States and abroad; and in the Peace Corps, the armed forces, and law enforcement. There are also professional career opportunities for our majors in private business (international relations and marketing in this country and overseas) and in the paramedical and paralegal professions. Majors in Hispanic studies pursue teaching careers at all levels, while others continue on for graduate studies in such fields as law, medicine, business, international relations, education and social services.

The Hiatt Career Center has a page devoted to Hispanic studies, which has a host of information specific to majors. For sample internships, alumni career paths, transferable skills, and links to professional websites, please visit the Hiatt Hispanic Studies Page.

The Hiatt Center has also compiled student destination data from Post-Grad surveys over the last five years. To discover career paths other students have pursued, please visit the First Destination Data Page.

More information can be found on the Internship & Job Opportunities section of the ROMS website.

(return to top)