Hanh Bui

Hanh BuiPhD - ABD
BA Stanford University
hbui@brandeis.edu

Research Interests

16th and 17th British literature, early modern health and conceptions of the body, materiality, age studies, medical humanities, ethics

Dissertation

The Promised End: Shakespeare, Old Age, and Technologies of the Human

Primary Adivsor

Ramie Targoff

Publications

"The Old Man in the Mirror: Constructions of Age in Shakespeare's Sonnets." In Shakespeare's Things: Agency, Materiality, and Performance. Edited by Brett Gamboa and Lawrence Switzky. Forthcoming from Palgrave Macmillan, 2018

Review of Shakespeare’s First Folio: Four Centuries of an Iconic Book by Emma Smith. The Shakespeare Newsletter 66.2 No. 298 (Spring 2017).

Presentations

“The Future Is Young Again: Age and De-Aging in Blade Runner, Parts I and II.”  European Society for the Study of English, Brno, Czech Republic. August 2018

“Shakespeare and the Moral Infirmities of Old Age.” British Shakespeare Association, Belfast, Ireland. June 2018

“Vision, Spectacles, and the Optics of Old Age.” Renaissance Society of America, New Orleans. March 2018

"Primary Vulnerabilities and Disability Politics in King Lear." Shakespeare Association of America, Atlanta. April 2017

"Effigies of Childhood in Kurzel's 'Macbeth.'"World Shakespeare Congress, Stratford-upon-Avon, England. August 2016

"Glass, Time, and Age in Shakespeare's Sonnets." ACLA Conference, Harvard University. March 2016

"Representing the Post-Maternal: A Reinterpretation of Volumnia." NeMLA Convention, Toronto. May 2015

"Aging and Sexual Decline in Donne's 'The Autumnal.'" Graduate Symposium, Brandeis University. November 2016

Awards

Mellon Dissertation Research Grant (2017)

Frankel Family Foundation Fellowship (2016)

Barbara and Morton Mandel Endowed Graduate Fellowship in English and American Literature (2013, 2014, 2015)

Courses Taught

UWS "Shakespeare in Love" (Fall 2015, Spring 2016)

(TF) "The Films of Disney." Professor Caren Irr, English Department (Spring 2015)

(TF) "Literature and Medicine." Professor David Sherman, English Department (Fall 2014). Guest lecture: "Renaissance Medicine"