More information

Expand All / Collapse All

'DEIS Impact events by topical category (click topic to view list)

Arts, Exhibititions and Screenings
Faith and Social Justice
Identity, Race and Gender
Society, Culture and Leadership
Students in Action

Full Listing of Events

'DEIS Impact 2017
See the full 2017 event booklet [PDF] and the 1 page (double sided) event schedule [PDF]

Multiday Events


'DEIS Impact at the Library

Display: Friday, Jan. 27-Sunday, Feb. 5, All day
Waltham Public Library and Brandeis Goldfarb Main Library 

The display of books and brochures at the Brandeis libraryFor the first time, 'DEIS Impact had a presence at the Waltham Public Library and the Brandeis Library. 'DEIS Impacters Abby Bergman and Danni Tang worked with the Laura Bernheim at the Waltham Public Library and Brenda Cummings at the Brandeis library. Both libraries mounted a display of books by the keynote speaker Rebecca Walker. The Brandeis library also displayed a substantial collection of books related to other 'DI events and themes (pictured above).

We Are Brandeis: Staff Stories

Display: Friday, Jan. 27-Sunday, Feb. 5, All day
Shapiro Campus Center Atrium
Event: Monday, Jan. 30, 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Shapiro Campus Center Multipurpose Room

People at the event pose for a pictureWe are Brandeis was a really interesting presentation of a project by LALS' department head, Laura Brown, about the stories of Brandeis staff who have immigrated to America. In her class "Mapping Latino Boston," Professor Brown and her students interviewed various staff, collecting oral histories about the challenges and benefits of leaving their home countries to start a new life in America. Professor Brown read some of these stories aloud and discussed some of the difficulties that the project faced, especially due to the election of Trump, which has led many people who have immigrated to America to become wary of having their names and backgrounds collected. Nevertheless, "We are Brandeis" shed light on the unheard but fascinating stories of Brandeis staff.
Summary by Danni Tang, 'DEIS Impacter

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

Sponsored by: Latin American and Latino Studies Department
For more information: Laura Brown, lcbrown@brandeis.edu

Invisible Walls: Language and the Immigrant Experience

Display: Friday, Jan. 27-Sunday, Feb. 5, All day
Shapiro Campus Center Atrium

This display exhibited pictures of the Waltham Family School, an ESOL school in Waltham, and photos of adult students in the Waltham Family School with descriptions of their experiences living in the United States as immigrants who are not able to speak English fluently. This display also includes a poster with the question "Imagine you live in a society where you do not know anyone there and cannot understand the local language, what would you do?". This display led many members of Brandeis community to realize how much they took for granted in this country by merely speaking English fluently. This event also raised awareness around Brandeis community on current immigration issues.
Summary by Yiyi Wu, 'DEIS Impacter

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

Sponsored by: Waltham Family School
For more information: Ilana Cedarbaum, icedar@brandeis.edu

Homelessness's Home: A Photography Display

Display: Friday, Jan. 27-Sunday, Feb. 5, All Day
Shapiro Campus Center Atrium

Homelessness home is a photography show by a group pf people from Waltham Community Day Center who are mostly vulnerable, homeless and experiencing mental, physical and substance abuse issues. They took beautiful pictures of nature in Waltham and presented them with contemplative descriptions of their experience. To them, nature is a cure for their pains and the place they trust the most. This photography show, by showing the unique side of homelessness, raised awareness around Brandeis Community on homelessness issues in a memorable way. 
Summary by Yiyi Wu, 'DEIS Impacter

Sponsored by: Waltham Community Day Center
For more information: Yiyi Wu, yyw1111@brandeis.edu



Thursday, January 26


'DEIS Impact Kickoff Party

Thursday, Jan. 26, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Shapiro Campus Center Atrium

A table of pamphlets and cotton candy at the kickoff partyThe 2017 'DEIS Impacter team and event coordinators kicked off the 6th annual 'DEIS Impact social justice festival by taking over the Shapiro Campus Center atrium and marketing the week of over 40 events centered around various causes that students at Brandeis feel passionate about. Featuring cotton candy, popcorn, and a live performance from the Chak De! Dance team, the kickoff was an opportunity for students to get pumped for a week full of social justice and learn how to get involved.
Summary by Amna Ahmed, 'DEIS Impacter

Sponsored by: 'DEIS Impacters
For more information: Amna Ahmed, aahmed15@brandeis.edu

From North Carolina to Orlando: Queer Policy Across America in 2016

Thursday, Jan. 26, 6:00-7:30 p.m.
Gender and Sexuality Center, Usdan

Rainbow flags at the GSCThis year, QPA did a workshop on LGBTQ+ rights in 2016 and 2017 - looking back to look ahead. First, attendees made a collaborative timeline of moments that they thought were significant for LGBTQ+ rights in 2016, then discussed videos about 2 specific moments: the first people in America to have intersex on their birth certificate and non-binary as a legal status. We then moved on to a discussion of what lies ahead in 2017, especially under the Trump administration, learning about various bills, organizations to support, and a report from the Human Rights Campaign about anti- and pro-LGBTQ+ policies anticipated in 2017. The best part of the event was the last part, where everyone came up with a collaborative list of ways to be an activist or to stand up for LGBTQ+ rights today, from daily life to marches to remembering to keep your sense of humor. All in all, it was a great way for people to get together, learn, talk, and go home with concrete ways to take action.
Summary by a 'DEIS Impacter

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

Sponsored by: Queer Policy Alliance
For more information: Laura Trietakova, laurat@brandeis.edu

What do Judaism and Islam say about Social Justice?

Thursday, Jan. 26, 6:00-7:30 p.m.
International Lounge, Usdan

Jewish and Muslim panelists talk at the eventCommon Ground’s 'DEIS Impact event featured Dr. Rabbi Schlomo Pill and Professor Suheil Laher in a panel discussing the religious perspectives of Judaism and Islam on social justice issues of civil disobedience and conflicts of belief in regards to the law. Each panelist gave an overview of religious scholarly discussion on social justice, which felt especially relevant to political issues today in regards to the American judicial system and the responsibilities of religious citizens. On dealing with living under a system that promotes policy that we may personally not accept, both panelists advised staying active in opposing said policy while staying within the law. In many respects, the similarities between Judaism and Islam were clear, and viewing the two religious views together highlighted this.
Summary by Amna Ahmed, 'DEIS Impacter

Sponsored by: Common Ground, Brandeis Interfaith Group and Brandeis Muslim Student Association
For more information: Habiba Farh, hfarh77@brandeis.edu

Mass Incarceration Series Part I (see Part II and Part III)

Mass Incarceration: A Panel on Causes and Pathways to Change

Thursday, Jan. 26, 7:30-9:00 p.m.
Alumni Lounge, Usdan

Panelists at the eventRead the article in the Justice. 

Panelists discussed the roots of mass incarceration within the United States, from policy, and cultural lenses. Issues relating to intersectional identities of race, poverty, substance use, and mental illness were identified as contributing to the root cause of mass incarceration. Contributing factors of male identity and social exclusion were also discussed by panelists with lived experience. Existing barriers to reintegration and potential levers for change were presented. The panel was moderated by MSW student/Massachusetts Bail Fund Intern Kaitlyn Gawet. Panelists represented the points of view of an attorney/forensic social worker (Lisa Newman-Polk, JD, LCSW), forensic social worker/researcher (Brandy Henry, LICSW, PhD Student), housing expert/formerly incarcerated person (David), and licensed alcohol & drug counselor/formerly incarcerated person (Keith).
Summary by Brandy Henry

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

Sponsored by: Heller School for Social Policy and Management
For more information: Brandy Henry, bhenry@brandeis.edu

Kosher/Soul? Black Jewish Identity Cooking

Thursday, Jan. 26, 7:30-9:00 p.m.
Sherman Function Hall

Michael Twitty cooking food and speaking at the eventFood historian and educator Michael Twitty gave a presentation and cooking lesson on what it means to be Black and Jewish. Michael told us his personal narrative and his experiences but also beautifully tied the two together with food. He told us the history of hummus and how it belongs to all the people- food is something to be celebrated and shared. Through a dynamic cooking demonstration, Twitty used food as a medium to explore his own intersecting African American and Jewish identities. This practice of "identity cooking" invites all participants to engage with and better understand the multifaceted nature of cultural intersections, food histories, and of course, identity. Then at the end, we all got to try some delicious black eyed pea hummus!
Summary by Julia Brown, 'DEIS Impacter

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

Sponsored by: Hillel at Brandeis, Brandeis Black Student Organization (BBSO) and Brandeis Bridges
For more information: Annie Lieber, alieber@brandeis



Friday, January 27


Activist Lab: Arts and the Refugee Situation

Friday, Jan. 27, 10:30 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
Alumni Lounge, Usdan

Participants sitting at a table having a conversationWith the rise of social media and deeply politically divided communities, polarization has become an increasing issue in western society in the last years. So how does one create spaces of open dialogue in a deeply divided and emotionally charged social environment? The Activist Lab aimed to tackle this question through an interactive method based on design thinking. The aim was to help social activists explore how community projects can be used for social justice work, particularly invoking what John Paul Lederach calls "the moral imagination," creating space for others' creativity and taking risks to tackle polarization. Not only did the groups come out with concrete ideas on how to create spaces of dialogue within their communities but they learned a constructive problem-solving methodology that taught the participants to become more proactive. The group brainstormed target audiences affected by polarization, mediums of contact and finally where they would connect in public spaces with diverse individuals. By identifying these fields the participants could build a basic and innovative structure to a potential solution that could become integral in developing concrete projects in the future. The concrete plans coming out of this workshop will influence a new project called the Aleppo project, which will work with refugees in Berlin and helped the research process of an article to be published by the German Heinrich Böll Stiftung based in Washington D.C. on online activism and polarisation.

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

Sponsored by: The Center for German and European Studies and the Rose Art Museum
For more information: Hauke Ziessler, hziessler@brandeis.edu

Mass Incarceration Series Part II (see Part I and Part III)

Ending Mass Incarceration: What is Being Done and What You Can Do

Friday, Jan. 27, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Mandel Center for the Humanities Reading Room 303

People talking with the panelists at the eventThis was a fantastic event produced by a grad student who is passionate about the injustices that take place in our justice system in regards to mass incarceration. The panelists had all different backgrounds and were each involved in a different organization that aims to work with the incarcerated in a number of capacities. The panelists discussed their respective organizations and explained many of the challenges that come with working with incarcerated people They also discussed the systematic injustices that disproportionately land people of color and disadvantaged people in the system with little hope for proper justice. One thing I never thought about: sending letters to people inside prison not only makes their day but also lets the guards know that there's someone on the outside who is looking out for them, and will know if something goes wrong. In this case, the power of a penpal runs deep. Deeply inspiring and thought provoking event.
Summary by Rachel Blau, 'DEIS Impacter

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

For more information: Marissa Johnson-Valenzuela, marissajv@gmail.com or David Poplar poplar@brandeis.edu

Coffee, Cupcakes, and Condoms

Friday, Jan. 27, 6:00-7:30 p.m.
Shapiro Campus Center Multipurpose Room

Coffee, cupcakes, and condoms on a table at the eventCoffee, Cupcakes, and Condoms was an open dialogue concerning the intersectional nature of reproductive justice led by Brandeis Students for Reproductive Justice. The cupcakes and coffee helped facilitate a safe and welcoming atmosphere in which participants could discuss deeply personal and rich topics. The conversation centered on the ways in which race, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic class, religion, and region limit people's access to reproductive care and information. After discussing these issues on both national and global levels, participants brainstormed some ways in which the Brandeis campus itself can work on becoming more reproductively just.
Summary by Abby Bergman, 'DEIS Impacter

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

Sponsored by: Brandeis Students for Reproductive Justice
For more information: Gaby Sandor, gmsandor@brandeis.edu

'DEIS Impact Shabbat with Hillel at Brandeis

Friday, Jan. 27, 6:00-8:30 p.m.
Sherman Function Hall

Prayer books and flowers on a table at the eventThis event allowed participants to enjoy a festive meal while discussing social justice. Questions about social justice featured in the 'DEIS Impact pamphlet lined the tables, and people had the opportunity to converse about social justice and how it connects to the Jewish religion. The event culminated with a lecture by a student member of Hillel at Brandeis on pursuing loving kindness to create a more socially just world. Event participants enjoyed the opportunity to learn about this topic in Judaism and use the lessons to create social change in everyday life.
Summary by Annie Fortnow, 'DEIS Impacter

Sponsored by: Hillel at Brandeis
For more information: Cindy Spungin, spungin@brandeis.edu



Saturday, January 28

Mass Incarceration Series Part III (See Part I and Part II)

And Still We Rise: Inside Out, Outside In

Saturday, Jan. 28, 1:30-3:00 p.m.
Shapiro Campus Center Multipurpose Room

Participants standing at the eventThis event addressed the injustices faced by the incarcerated both inside and outside of prision. The facilitator led interactive activities through the lens of theater productions that had everyone up on their feet, taking a "stand" against injustices, as well as engaging in conversation and challenging their own views about the problems and some possible solutions.
Summary by Rachel Blau, 'DEIS Impacter

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

Sponsored by: Schneider Institutes for Health Policy, Institute for Behavioral Health
For more information: Dev Luthra, andstillwerise@gmail.com

Business Investing in Social Justice

Saturday, Jan. 28, 4:00-5:30 p.m.
Lurias, Hassenfeld Conference Center

The moderator speaking with the three panelists at the eventRead the article in the Justice. 

The event highlighted the power of consumers to contribute to social and environmental justice through their purchases. The three Brandeis alumni on the panel were passionate and insightful. The panel was moderated by Allison Marill '17. Carly Greenberg spoke about the value of investment and divestment. Elana Reinholtz explained that your consumer purchase is a vote, and she encouraged people to shop with their values. Hannah Saltman described her journey from believing business was the antithesis of the environment to engaging large corporations on environmental issues. They all offered advice on building relationships with professionals and being confident in the knowledge you have. They inspired the audience to believe that businesses can use their influence to benefit society.
Summary by Heather Spector, 'DEIS Impacter

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

Sponsored by: Net Impact Brandeis Undergraduate Chapter
For more information: Heather Spector, hspector@brandeis.edu

Stand Up for Peace: if we can laugh together, we can live together

Saturday, Jan. 28, 7:00-9:00 p.m.
Levin Ballroom, Usdan

Comedians on stage at the eventRead the article in the Justice. 

Stand Up for Peace brought to Brandeis the comedy duo of Scott Blakeman and Dean Obeidallah, who entertained with a light-hearted take on Jewish-Muslim relations, as well as the current political climate with regards to both religious groups. Both comedians performed individual sets, starting with Scott Blakeman, who wonderfully described the audience as one of “millions” in reference to Trump’s comments on his inauguration crowd. Dean Obeidallah followed, joking about having Muslim names and its benefit in protecting Muslims from identity theft. After the show was a Q&A session with the comedians, which brought up an interesting discussion on how to dispel tensions, as Dean advocated that we become active in the media so that we can dispel misconceptions by reaching a larger audience. The positivity and optimism of the show reminded the audience that oftentimes, we just need a good laugh to get us through.
Summary by Amna Ahmed, 'DEIS Impacter

Sponsored by: Brandeis Muslim Student Association, Brandeis Interfaith Group, and Common Ground
For more information: Amna Ahmed, aahmed15@brandeis.edu  



Sunday, January 29


The End of Global Poverty Is Near: Be an Advocate, Take a Stand

Sunday, Jan. 29, 11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
Mandel Center for the Humanities Reading Room 303

At this event, the ONE Campaign had Gordon Wong, who works at the campaign, come to speak about the work that ONE does and the global poverty crisis. We learned that the ONE Campaign is both nonprofit and nonpartisan, and has 100 chapters in 44 states. The main advocacy methods that ONE utilizes are through campaigning, which includes things like phone calls, writing letters, and meeting with elected officials. Gordon also discussed some of the specific campaigns that ONE has worked on, including the "Electrify Africa" act, the "Poverty is Sexist" campaign, and the READ act, which focuses on global education. The fact that ONE is bipartisan allows it to mitigate with politicans effectively, and it plans to do more work with the new Presidential administration. 
Summary by Elisabeth Shaller, 'DEIS Impacter

Sponsored by: ONE at Brandeis
For more information: Sage Rosenthal, srose0706@brandeis.edu

Housing Insecurity in Waltham: Building Understanding

Sunday, Jan. 29, 2:00-3:30 p.m.
International Lounge, Usdan

A speaker at the event

Photo by Talya G, The Justice

Read the article in the Justice. 

At this event, leaders and students from Watch CDC and Habitat for Humanity led a great lecture about the housing situation in Watham, which included the prices of housing and racial and wealth distrutoin in Waltham. The event also exhibited the cruel reality of housing insecrurity. They invited many speakers from WatchCDC who were victims of housing inscrurity to share their personal experiences. Hearing the people who personally suffered from an injust housing system gave audiences a direct way to understand housing insecrurities. At the beginning of the lecture, audience members were encouraged to write down their answers to different questions on posters that were exhibited around the lecture. One each poster, there was one question, such as "Describe your neighborhood growing up", "what was your housing experience" and "How do you define 'home'" etc. These questions really enabled audiences to relate their experiences to many of the others.
Summary by Yiyi Wu, 'DEIS Impacter

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

Sponsored by: Habitat for Humanity, Hunger and Homelessness and Social Justice and Social Policy Program
For more information: Rachel Lederer, rlederer@brandeis.edu

Books as Mirrors: A Workshop on Diversity in Media

Sunday, Jan. 29, 3:30-5:00 p.m.
Mandel Center for the Humanities Reading Room 303

People sitting around a table at the eventAt this event, the Harry Potter Alliance led an intriguing discussion on diversity, or the lack thereof, in popular media. The topics of discussion ranged from gender identity, race, mental illness, religious identity, etc., and how these different diversities are depicted in books, movies, and television shows. It was interesting to listen to the views and opinions of the group, as it made it hit closer to home, so to speak. Another interesting point that was discussed was that authors often do include diverse characters, but in ways that enforce and encourage stereotypes. For example, one visitor brought up a point that often many queer characters have storylines that revolve around their queerness. Representative literature often caters to stereotypes with diverse characters. The discussion then shifted to a group brainstorming on how authors could include diverse characters in more open and less discriminatory ways. In conclusion, this event drew attention to an issue that is often times overlooked. Diversity in media is critically important in representing diverse audiences.
Summary by Zosia Busé, 'DEIS Impacter

Sponsored by: Brandeis Harry Potter Alliance
For more information: Alyssa Berez, aberez@brandeis.edu



Monday, January 30


We Are Brandeis: Staff Stories

Event: Monday, Jan. 30, 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Shapiro Campus Center Multipurpose Room
Display: Friday, Jan. 27-Sunday, Feb. 5, All Day
Shapiro Campus Center Atrium

People at the event posing for a pictureSee full description.

Sponsored by: Latin American and Latino Studies
For more information: Laura Brown, lcbrown@brandeis.edu

Brandeis Asian American Task Force: Not Your Model Minority

Monday, Jan. 30, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Shapiro Campus Center 313

Danni Tang posing for a picture at the eventBrandeis Asian American Task Force hosted an event to educate the Brandeis community on the Model Minority Myth, issues that Asian American students face, and how you can support its projects. BAATF member Danni Tang presented a brief history of the Model Minority Myth, the idea that Asian Americans are successful and well-off because they overcame racism through hard work. As event attendees learned, the Myth is actually rooted in racism, specifically against Black civil rights activists with whom Asian American activists closely worked in the 1960s. They also learned about several issues that AAPIs face, watching a video about the Cambodian immigrant and Cambodian American community and seeing how grouping Asian Americans together actually obscures the reality that Southeast Asians struggle much differently than some East and South Asians. Finally, audience members learned about BAATF's founding when it began its campaign for AAPI Studies last year, as well as its other projects to promote AAPI mental health and LGBTQ+ AAPIs. Attendees went home with a list of ways to challenge the Model Minority Myth and get more involved with BAATF.
Summary by Danni Tang, 'DEIS Impacter

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

Sponsored by: Brandeis Asian American Task Force
For more information: Danni Tang, dtang@brandeis.edu

Exploring social justice in the Brandeis classroom and beyond: courses, internships and careers

Monday, Jan. 30, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Levine Ross, Hassenfeld Conference Center

Participants at the event
Photo by Kirby K, The Justice

Read the article in the Justice.

This event consisted of 5 panelists- all undergraduate students majoring in a variety of areas. The panel was moderated by Professor Sarah Curi. Curi asked anything from "Why did you choose your major?" to "Do your parents approve of your educational path?" These questions evoked some strong responses from the panelists, who had an overall passion for social justice in their future work. One interesting topic brought up was the intersection of modern medicine and psychology. Panelist Adele stressed the importance of learning beyond the textbook for medical practices. Things like bed-side manners and knowledge of public health practices will make the care more personalized and effective. These panelists encourage everyone to find how social justice fits into your life and how you can make everything a cuase worth fighting for.
Summary by Julia Brown, 'DEIS Impacter

Sponsored by: Health: Science, Society & Policy Program, Social Justice and Social Policy Program
For more information: Sarah Curi, scuri@brandeis.edu

Is Polygamy Good for Women? Religious Tolerance and Gender Equality

Monday, Jan. 30, 3:30-5:00 p.m.
Hadassah Brandeis Institute Lecture Hall, Women's Studies Research Center

Panelists at a tableAt this event, sponsored by the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute, panelists provided insight on the question of polygamy. Panelists included Lisa Fishbayn Jaffe, Mark Goldfeder, Debra Majeed, and Janet Bennion. This event highlighted the fact that there are some instances were polygamy works and there is a such thing as "well functioning polygamy." From a legal standpoint, the institution of marriage in the United States has already been revised in our lifetime, so we should be more understanding of its flexible nature. One theme that ran through each panelist's presentation was that people should be supportive of healthy relationships in any form that they take. Regardless of one's answer or opinion for the event title question, "Is Polygamy Good for Women?," it is already here and criminalization will not eliminate it.
Summary by Abby Bergman, 'DEIS Impacter

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

Sponsored by: Hadassah-Brandeis Institute
For more information: Amy Powell, aspowell@brandeis.edu

Assessing Occupational Exposure in Black Hair Salons

Monday, Jan. 30, 6:30-8:00 p.m.
Levine Ross, Hassenfeld Conference Center

Laptops demonstrating the findings This event featured two Schiff Fellows at Brandeis University discussing their research on occupational exposure in Black hair salons. As part of the Environmental Health and Justice Community Field Program at Brandeis, Annie Fortnow and Allison Marill started research on air quality in Black hair salons in the Boston area and the implications of their findings on worker health. Fortnow and Marill began research through a recruitment process, ending up with ten salon partners in their study. The team then tested for air quality using a variety of equipment and found concerning levels of Particulate Matter 2.5, Carbon Dioxide, and Volatile Organic Compounds, including Benzene and Chloroform. Fortnow and Marill are continuing research on this topic through a partnership with the Boston Public Health Commission in looking at "clean" products that are already on the market for Black women. At the end of their presentation on their research, event attendents engaged in a discussion of what they already knew about environmental health concerns due to personal beauty products and what they could do as consumers to protect their health and safey as well as the health and safety of the environment.
Summary by Annie Fortnow, 'DEIS Impacter

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

Sponsored by: Environmental Studies Department
For more information: Annie Fortnow, afortnow@brandeis.edu



Tuesday, January 31


Racial Trauma and Mental Health: Let's talk about it

Tuesday, Jan. 31, 1:30-3:00 p.m.
International Lounge, Usdan

People talking at the eventThis intimate discussion centered on the experiences surrounding racial trauma. We unpacked what racial trauma is and how it impacts the lives of people from racial minorities. Professor Wright included a clinical perspective and spoke about the possibility of healing. Professor Ray included an Afro-American studies perspective and spoke from her personal experiences. Brandis Whitfield and Jason also spoke from their personal experiences and gave student perspectives. We discussed heavy topics the moderator, Ely Schudrich, brought up, and other topics brought up by the audience. The topics included white privledge and personal accounts of racism. Attendees better understood what it means to benefit from a system of oppression. The panelists explained that it can be traumatic for people from racial minorites to grow up experiencing oppression and raicsm. And it can be traumatic to learn that your family had to experience this before you as well.
Summary by Heather Spector, 'DEIS Impacter

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF]. 

Sponsored by: Active Minds at Brandeis University
For more information: Ely Schudrich, eschudrich@brandeis.edu

Keynote Address: "The World in You and You in the World: Identity in Action"

With Rebecca Walker

Tuesday, Jan. 31, 7:30 p.m.
Shapiro Campus Center Theatre

Rebecca Walker speakingRead the article in the Boston Globe, the article in the Hoot and the article in the Justice. 

See a video of the talk. 

Co-sponsored by: Intercultural Center



Wednesday, February 1


Defying Expectations: Chess Grandmaster Susan Polgar

Wednesday, Feb. 1, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Sherman Function Hall

Susan Polgar speaking with the two moderators at the eventRead the article in the Hoot and the article in the Justice. 

Sponsored by Brandeis Chess Club, "Defying Expectations: Chess Grandmaster Susan Polgar" brought Susan Polgar, the first woman to earn the Grandmaster title in chess and a five-time Olympic gold medal winner, to Brandeis campus. During the panel conversation, Polgar discussed her childhood in Hungary and the ways in which being a grandchild of Holocaust survivors has influenced her. Additionally, she elaborated on the fact that chess is not equally encouraged for boys and girls. Although the game is based on how much effort individuals are willing to devote to improve themselves rather than physical capabilites, men still dominate the game. It was quite inspiring to hear how she has been able to conquer a realm that has not been as accessible to women and that does not treat female players with the same respect as male players. At the end of the event, she played 10 lucky audience members at once - however, this was no sweat for Polgar as she is also the world record holder for most chess games played simultaneously: a staggering 309 games at once. Of all the 10 simultaneous games, Polgar only lost one – quite a feat for that one individual to beat an Olympian chess player!
Summary by Abby Bergman, 'DEIS Impacter

Sponsored by: Brandeis Chess Club, Brandeis Department of Sociology, Hadassah-Brandeis Institute
For more information: Joe DeFerrari, jrdef@outlook.com

Raising Your Voice: Advocacy, Argumentation and Social Justice

Wednesday, Feb. 1, 5:00-6:30 p.m.
Alumni Lounge, Usdan

People sitting and talking at the eventThis event, organized by the Brandeis debate team, welcomed student leaders across campus to come and share their methods of advocacy. The event was well attended and participants gained new insights into ways of relating their passions and interests to social justice, and then how to use their voices to spread their message.
Summary by Rachel Blau, 'DEIS Impacter

Sponsored by: Brandeis Academic Debate and Speech Society
For more information: Helen Wong, hwong621@brandeis.edu

"Transparent" screening with post-show discussion featuring Rebecca Walker 

Wednesday, Feb. 1, 7:00-8:30 p.m.
Wasserman Cinematheque, Sachar International Center 

Rebecca Walker talking with panelists at the eventRead the article in the Justice. 

Co-sponsored by: Film, Television and Interactive Media Program, The Eli J. and Phyllis N. Segal Citizen Leadership Program

For more information: ethics@brandeis.edu 



Thursday, February 2


'DEIS Impact College:
Celebrity Status and Social Justice: A Double-Edged Sword

Thursday, Feb. 2, 10:00-10:50 a.m.
Shapiro Campus Center Multipurpose Room

An open session of SOC 156b, Sociology of Celebrity, with Michael Strand. See the article in the Justice. 

'DEIS Impact College: Consumption as a Political or Ethical Activity

Thursday, Feb. 2, 11:00-11:50 a.m.
Shapiro Campus Center Multipurpose Room

An open session of SOC 150b, Culture of Consumption, with Laura Miller. Click here for a summary of this open class.

'DEIS Impact College: Contemporary Theatre and the Theory of Bio-Power

Thursday, Feb. 2, 12:00-12:50 p.m.
Shapiro Campus Center Multipurpose Room

An open session of ENG 170b, Contemporary Theatre and Performance: Between Rights and the Post-Human, with Tom King. Click here for a summary of this open class.

'DEIS Impact College: Stories Maps Tell and Stories Withheld

Thursday, Feb. 2, 1:00-1:50 p.m.
Shapiro Campus Center Multipurpose Room

An open session of LALS 144b, Mapping Latino Boston, with Laura Brown. Click here for a summary of this open class.

'DEIS Impact College: Strange Fruit: Lynching in History and Memory

Thursday, Feb. 2, 2:00-3:20 p.m.
Shapiro Campus Center Multipurpose Room

An open session of AAAS 156a, #BlackLivesMatter: The Struggle of Civil Rights from Reconstruction to the Present, with Chad Williams. Click here for a summary of this open class.

Should Where You Live Determine If You Live? Medical Relief in Peru

Thursday, Feb. 2, 3:00-4:30 p.m.
International Lounge, Usdan

This event, sponsored by the Foundation for Medical Relief of Children, focused on discussing critical issues of global health that are pressing in developing nations around the world. FIMRC operates in countries such as Costa Rica, Ecuador, Uganda, and several other developing nations. Their projects range from providing proper treatment to those with diabetes to starting clinics in hard to reach communities. This event focused specifically on health crises in Peru and what can be done to alleviate them. Speakers included Dominic Hodgkin, an esteemed member of the Brandeis faculty who has done work in Peru. The event concluded with a lively discussion on global health inequality and what individuals can do to help.
Summary by Hannah Sussman, 'DEIS Impacter

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

Sponsored by: Foundation for International Medical Relief of Children (FIMRC)
For more information: Ariel Lee, arie1lee@brandeis.edu

'DEIS Impact College: The Intersection of Race, Law and Power

Thursday, Feb. 2, 3:30-4:50 p.m. 
Shapiro Campus Center Multipurpose Room

An open session of ENG 141b, Critical Race Theory, with Aliyyah Abdur-Rahman. Click here for a summary of this open class.

Modern 3D Printing Meets Disabilities

Thursday, Feb. 2, 4:30-6:00 p.m.
Alumni Lounge, Usdan

A powerpoint slide at the eventThis event, sponsored by the Brandeis Prosthesis Club, gave attendees a hands-on introduction into the exciting field of cutting edge technology in social justice. This event explored the world of 3D printing and how it can be used as a cheaper alternative to expensive prosthetics for families in need. Through open-source information and technology, there has been a revolution in accessibility to custom, 3D printed prosthetics. Participants in the event were invited to begin to construct their own prosthetic hands and take the first steps towards getting certified in 3D printing. This event succeeded in stressing the importance of the unique and often overlooked relationship between technology and social justice.
Summary by Hannah Sussman, 'DEIS Impacter

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

Sponsored by: Brandeis Prosthesis Club
For more information: David Landesman, dlandesm@brandeis.edu

'DEIS Impact College: Ethical Dimensions of Big Data and Business Analytics

Thursday, Feb. 2, 5:00-6:20 p.m. 
Shapiro Campus Center Multipurpose Room

An open session of BUS 211f, Analyzing Big Data, with Rob Carver. Click here for a summary of this open class.

Genes in the 21st Century

Thursday, Feb. 2, 5:00-6:30 p.m.
Shapiro Campus Center 313

Read the article in the Justice

This event, sponsored by the group United Against Inequities in Disease, thoughtfully discussed the nuances of genetic testing and procedures in the 21st century and the ethical questions that come with them. After a brief presentation, a panel discussion was led by professionals, professors, and graduate students in the field of genetic testing from the Heller School at Brandeis. This event highlighted the importance of social justice and ethics in the medical field. UAID currently has chapters at 11 universities and aims to empower students to work to eliminate medical inequities and injustices.
Summary by Hannah Sussman, 'DEIS Impacter

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

Sponsored by: United Against Inequities in Disease
For more information: Brandeis UAID, uaidbrandeis@gmail.com

Destruction of Memory – Documentary Film and Expert Dialogue

Thursday, Feb. 2, 7:00-9:30 p.m.
Wasserman Cinematheque, Sachar International Center

The film screening of “Destruction of Memory” sparked interesting conversation on the relation between a genocide of a people and the cultural genocide of monuments and objects that is often overlooked. The documentary juxtaposed interviews with unbelievable footage of the demolition of temples and mosques, highlighting similarities between destruction during the Holocaust and destruction in Syria today. While touching upon other instances of cultural genocide and the international legal relations that correspond, the film discussed the importance of preserving culture. The screening was followed by a panel with the filmmaker Tim Slade, Andras Riedlmayer, a witness on cultural destruction before the UN war crimes tribunal in The Hague, Kristin Parker, interim director of the Rose Art Museum, and Leigh Swigart of the Ethics Center. They discussed ongoing problems with discourse on destruction of monuments, the importance of modern buildings, and utility over historical significance.
Summary by Amna Ahmed, 'DEIS Impacter

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

Sponsored by: Rose Art Museum and The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
For more information: Kristin Parker, kparker1@brandeis.edu



Friday, February 3


'DEIS Impact College: 
Responses to Social Injustice in Women's Popular Cinema: The Case of "Marie Antoinette"

Friday, Feb. 3, 9:30-10:50 a.m.
Shapiro Campus Center Multipurpose Room

An open session of FILM 114a, Genre, Gender, and Women's Filmmaking, with Mary Harrod. Click here for a summary of this open class.

'DEIS Impact College: The Perils of Struggle: Post-Liberation Politics in Africa

Friday, Feb. 3, 11:00 a.m.-12:20 p.m.
Shapiro Campus Center Multipurpose Room

An open session of AAAS 162a, Assassination: A History of 20th Century Africa, with Carina Ray. Click here for a summary of this open class.

Faculty Reflections on Five Years of 'DEIS Impact: A Luncheon Discussion

Friday, Feb. 3, 12:00 p.m.- 1:50 p.m.
Lurias, Hassenfeld Conference Center

Participants at the event See full description

Sponsored by: The International Center for Ethics, Justice and Public Life and the Brandeis Faculty Senate

Controversy in Japanese Feminism

Friday, Feb. 3, 5:30-7:00 p.m.
Intercultural Center

People sitting on couches and chairs at the eventThe Japanese Student Association prepared a presentation on the traditionally subordinate role of women in Japanese society. Women are expected to be caregivers and mothers, while men are expected to be dominant in the workforce outside of the home. After learning about the role of women in Japanese society, the attendees broke into smaller groups to discuss feminism across cultures. People spoke about how being a woman in Japan is similar and different to being a woman in the United States. We were honored to have a group of visitors -- students and faculty -- attend this event from the Showa Women University in Tokyo and Showa Boston.
Summary by Heather Spector, 'DEIS Impacter

Sponsored by: Japanese Student Association
For more information: Yu Dai, yukidai@brandeis.edu

Being a Refugee, Being a Rescuer: Film Screening of "The People's Crisis"

Friday, Feb. 3, 7:00-8:30 p.m.
Shapiro Campus Center Multipurpose Room

A poster at the eventRead the article in the Justice. 

The Brandeis Liberty in North Korea club showed a film screening of "The People's Crisis," followed by a discussion. The screening was very emotional and educational. The film screening shined light on the refugee crisis in North Korea and the struggles with finding safety. The audience followed a team from the Liberty in North Korea organization that was able to rescue refugees from dangerous conditions in North Korea by bringing them through China to more southern parts of Asia. We learned that even after getting out of North Korea, there was a high risk of human trafficking. After the film we discussed how courageous both refugees and rescuers need to be. We were left shocked and outraged by the danger North Korean refugees face and inspired by the resilience of the human spirit.
Summary by Heather Spector, 'DEIS Impacter

Sponsored by: Brandeis Liberty in North Korea
For more information: Sungwoo Kim, kjustin@brandeis.edu

'DEIS Impact Open Mic Night: Diversifying Discussion through Artistic Expression

Friday, Feb. 3, 9:00-10:30 p.m.
Chum’s Coffeehouse

Someone speaking on stage at the eventRead the article in the Hoot and the article in the Justice. 

At this event, Laurel Moon sponsored an Open Mic that worked to explore diversifying discussion through performance and art. Performances ranged from raps, songs, and poetry all about social justice. What was most interesting about the event was that the majority of the performances were self-written and were about social-justice issues specific to the individual, which allowed the audience to gain a unique perspective on issues that not everyone experiences. In all, Laurel Moon did a great job creating for an open space for diverse discussion and expression.
Summary by Zosia Busé, 'DEIS Impacter

Sponsored by: Laurel Moon, English Department
For more information: Clayre Benzadón, cbenz@brandeis.edu



Saturday, February 4

Overlooked STEM Women: Gender Justice Then and Now

Saturday, Feb. 4, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Geller, Hassenfeld Conference Center

A presenter at the event
Photo by Kirby K, The Justice

Read the article in the Justice. 

This event, sponsored by Brandeis Encourages Women in Science and Engineering (BeWISE), provided attendees with a look into the often overlooked story of the women who successfully created the world’s first all-electronic, programmable computer for a secret project in World War II. This event featured a documentary called “The Computers” which depicted the great and overshadowed achievements of these women through exclusive footage and interviews from the 1940s. The screening of the film was followed by a discussion on sexism and prejudice against women in STEM fields, especially computer science, in the past and now. The event was well attended by female students in STEM fields and others who provided their personal insights and experiences on the topic.
Summary by Hannah Sussman, 'DEIS Impacter

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

Sponsored by: Brandeis Encourages Women in Science and Engineering (BeWiSE)
For more information: Isabella Giunta, igiunta@brandeis.edu

Talking Social Justice Across Disciplines

Saturday, Feb. 4, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Lurias, Hassenfeld Conference Center

Aneil Tripathy speaking at the eventDeisortium, Talking Social Justice Across Disciplines, was an open forum about interdisciplinary collaboration. The event integrated Design Thinking to workshop the audiences’ feelings, dreams, actions, and attitudes, in order to brainstorm a way to work together, systematically, to make the most effective and viable collaborations possible to promote and enhance social justice across disciplines, endeavors, and workspaces. The workshop used empathy mapping, point of view statements, ideation and group sharing, and a Q&A to creating a working idea of what can be done to promote interdisciplinary social justice work.
Summary by Zosia Busé, 'DEIS Impacter

Sponsored by: Anthropology Department, Deisortium, and This Anthropological Life
For more information: Aneil Tripathy, tripathy@brandeis.edu

Rising Above: An Exploration of Dance and Body Culture

Saturday, Feb. 4, 4:00-5:30 p.m.
Levin Ballroom, Usdan

Dancers on stage at the eventRead the article in the Justice and an interview with the event organizers. 

This event showcased three different performances choreographed by two first year students. the event was held in order to shed light on some of the exteme body standards that exist within the dance world. The event opened with a video clip from the movie Hairspray, in which Tracy is ridiculed for her size. Then, the first dance was performed, with the asistance of onstage mirrors, and represented some of the struggles of body culture. The second piece was a tribute to the Black Lives Matter movement, and was performed to represent rising above silence. In the third dance, all four dancers performed, and the mood was uplifting as the dancers expressed overcoming adversity. Lastly, the performers spoke about their own experiences with body shaming in the dance world, and about how they were inspired to start a conversation around this issue.
Summary by Danni Tang, 'DEIS Impacter

For more information: Maria Kulchyckyj, kulchyckyjm@brandeis.edu

Ethics of Volunteering Abroad

Saturday, Feb. 4, 5:30-7:00 p.m.
Shapiro Campus Center Multipurpose Room

People at the event sitting in chairs having a conversationThe Ethics of Volunteering Abroad event involved an intimate conversation on cultural competency and how to truly help abroad without exploiting a culture. Event participants came in with a wide range of knowledge about the topic and contributed to the discussion through critical thinking and lessons learned from past experiences. At the beginning of the event, participants went around and posed questions they hoped to learn from the group about volunteering abroad. Questions included how to make volunteering abroad less of a selfish act, how to get involved in volunteer work abroad, the qualifications needed to volunteer abroad, and more. Together, event participants concluded that when volunteering abroad, one should know and understand his or her intentions. To truly help, one should try to really understand a culture through studying the history of that culture and through fully immersing onself in the culture.
Summary by Annie Fortnow, 'DEIS Impacter

For more information: Shikha Chandarana, shikhac@brandeis.edu

Activism Through Song: Advancing Social Justice Through Folk Music, A Concert and Discussion with Magpie

Saturday, Feb. 4, 7:00-8:30 p.m.
Mandel Center for the Humanities Forum

Magpie performing at the eventAt this event we were graced by a beautiful and inspiring musical performance by 'Magpie' accompanied with history and meaning behind many of America's folk heroes. They played pieces that represented so many pieces of American history. Events represented were the civil rights, the Vietnam war, land and water disputes with Native Americans, and religious tyranny. Magpie reminded us how important it is to dedicate yourself to something but to also remember that you cannot fix all of the problems in the world. This timely show left us all with a sense of relief and calmness, especially hearing the beauitful strummings and harmonies of mandolins and dulcimers. Magpie had a heavy focus on representing voices of marginalized peoples, especially Indigenous peoples. They have performed and marched all over and are far from ending their fight. Magpie also taught us the importance of music and the power that one song can have. Music reaches and unites people in a way that words can't. No matter if you're singing or writing, we can all make a difference.
Summary by Julia Brown, 'DEIS Impacter

Check out their ideas for lasting impact [PDF].

Sponsored by: Brandeis Traditional Music Club, Brandeis Farmer’s Club, Brandeis Guitar Club, Peace, Conflict, and Coexistence Studies (PAX), Department of Music, Education Program, Environmental Studies Program, Social Justice and Social Policy (SJSP), and Students for Environmental Action (SEA)
For more information: Rebecca Weiss, rrweiss@brandeis.edu

'DEIS Impact Afterparty

Saturday, Feb. 4, 9:30-10:30 p.m.
Chum’s Coffeehouse

People mingling and chatting at the after partyThe 2017 ‘DEIS Impact Afterparty in Chums brought students together to celebrate all our experiences from the last 10 days of commitment to social justice. As cotton candy and popcorn were served at the door, ‘DEIS Impacters Julia Brown and Abby Bergman announced the raffle winners of the prizes donated by different ‘DEIS Impact events. Afterwards, Heather Spector, the DEIS Impact chair, encouraged students to share inspiring moments during ‘DEIS Impact in which they learned about new social justice issues or engaged in important discussions. All in all, the afterparty served as a fun way to celebrate the lasting “impact” of 'DEIS Impact.
Summary by Amna Ahmed, 'DEIS Impacter

Sponsored by: 'DEIS Impacters
For more information: Elisabeth Shaller, eshaller@brandeis.edu

 

Postponed Events

Lurie Institute Film Screening: "Sound and Fury"

NEW DATE: Tuesday, Mar. 21, 5:30-8:30 p.m. 
International Lounge, Usdan

“Sound and Fury” is a documentary that delves into two brothers grappling with decisions about whether or not to give their children cochlear implants. After jumping into the world of Deaf culture and communication, a panel of experts in the field will reflect on and discuss the film and its current implications.

Sponsored by: Lurie Institute for Disability Policy
For more information: Eliana Rosenthal, erosen@brandeis.edu

Breaking the Binary: The Challenges and Possibilities for Transgender Athletes

POSTPONED

The fixed gender binary in sports is something many of us take for granted. While the transgender community has made remarkable strides in recent years, the world of athletics continues to marginalize those who do not fit into strict gender delineations. Come down to Gosman and join us for a discussion about the challenges transgender athletes face as well as the possible solutions athletics can take to create an equitable playing field for all. Then stick around Gosman to support Brandeis basketball teams as they take on Emory! Games at 6:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m.

Sponsored by: Brandeis Athletics and the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee
For more information: Gabe Margolis, gabem@brandeis.edu

STANDFest

Virtual Reality video display and Film Festival
POSTPONED 

Want to learn about genocide and mass atrocities around the world? Join us as part of STANDFest, a traveling film festival to empower students to support policy efforts advocating for genocide and mass atrocity prevention. STAND has partnered with the Nexus Fund to offer "Call Us Rohingya," a 10-minute Virtual Reality experience highlighting the plight of the Rohingya, a persecuted minority group living in forced displacement camps in Burma.The film festival will also feature a documentary about resources fueling the conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Panelists will discuss the progress of conflict mineral legislation and the state of political affairs in Congo. Don’t stand by, STAND up.

Sponsored by: STAND: the Student-Led Movement to End Mass Atrocities
For more information: Jessica Goldstein, jpg825@brandeis.edu




For more information about 'DEIS Impact click here.
Questions about this weeklong festival of justice? Email ethics@brandeis.edu