Your major is just the beginning...

Your major helps you develop knowledge, skills and abilities that employers seek.

To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through your coursework, activities and work, consider using the reflection worksheets (accessible via B.hired > Resources) and/or Type Focus (accessible via B.hired > Resources).

To build your resume, please review Hiatt's sample resumes.

Internships

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Just log on with your UNET ID and use the advanced search to search internships by major.

Biological Physics

Overview
First Destination Data
What to do with a degree in Biological Physics
Biological Physics Web Sites
Graduate School Information

Overview 

The Biological Physics program is designed to provide the quantitative skills and the biology background for students interested in the study of the physics of biological systems on the molecular scale. This program provides a strong foundation in the physical sciences, which underpins much of the modern revolution in biology. It should be of particular interest to students wishing to pursue careers in fundamental or applied research in biophysics, quantitative biology and biotechnology.

The Biological Physics program combines mathematics, physics and biology in an unusual and exciting opportunity for undergraduates. Here, early in your college career, you will be involved in significant research, working directly with world-class faculty at the forefront of this field. This is the perfect major for the student whose abilities tend toward the quantitative sciences of mathematics and physics, but whose enthusiasm and aspirations lean toward the life sciences.

First Destination Data

The Hiatt Center is pleased to provide a list of organizations, titles and fields of alumni who majored in your discipline. Click here to download a sortable excel spreadsheet listing the first destination graduate programs and employment opportunities that Biological Physics alumni from the classes of 2008-2014 secured within six months of graduation.

The diverse list is indicative of the wealth of transferable skills students cultivate as a Biological Physics major at Brandeis.

Year Title Company Industry
2011 Software Engineer FactSet Computer Science
2009 Research Assistant Princeton University Research


What to Do with a Degree in Biological Physics (.pdf)


Biological Physics Web Sites

Graduate School Information and Resources

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Skills, Abilities & Knowledge

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Your program of study at Brandeis University provides both field-specific knowledge and a broad range of transferable skills, abilities and knowledge that are sought after by all employers in all fields and enhance your experience and success in the world of work. To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through coursework, activities and work, take TypeFocus.

Skills1

  • Science — Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
  • Judgment and Decision Making — Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Writing — Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Complex Problem Solving — Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions. Equipment Selection — Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.

Abilities

  • Inductive Reasoning — The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
  • Written Comprehension — The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • Written Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • Category Flexibility — The ability to generate or use different sets of rules for combining or grouping things in different ways.
  • Information Ordering — The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
  • Speech Clarity — The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you. Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.

Knowledge

  • Biology — Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
  • Chemistry — Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal methods.
  • Computers and Electronics — Knowledge of electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Mathematics — Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.

1 Excerpted from O*Net OnLine, US Department of Labor by the National Center for O*Net Developmen


Sample of Possible Occupations

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Agronomist
Environmental Engineer
Marine Engineering Tech
Animal Scientist
Aquaculture Farmer
Environmental Protection
Marine Geologist
Aqua Culturist
Ergonomist
Fish Hatchery Tech
Aquarium Technician
Fisheries Conservation
Market Research Analyst
Aquatic Biologist
Medical Illustrator
Barrier Beach Manager
Food Scientist-Tech
Medical Laboratory Tech
Bio-Engineer
Forester
Medical Librarian
Bio-Technologist
Genetic Eng. Research
Biochemist
Geographer
Meteorologist
Health Officer
Microbiologist
Horticulturist
Botanist
Hospital Administrator
Mortician
Chemical Oceanographer
Water Quality Technician
Science Illustrator
Commercial Inland Water Transportation Worker

Hydrographic Surveyor
Museum/Aquarium Administrator
Chiropractor
Industrial Hygienist
Mycologist Coastal Resources Manager
Industrial Marine Economist
Commercial Fishing Eng.
Limnological Technician
Coroner
Marine-Coastal Consultant
Neurobiologist
Dentist
Marine Bacteriologist
Oceanographer
Dietitian
Nutritionist
Marine Biologist
Paramedic
Ecologist
Marine Ecologist
Parasitologist
Pharmacy Technician
Physical Therapist
Pharmaceutical Sales
Public Health Worker
Physician
Zoologist
Science Teacher
Salt Marsh Manager
Wildlife Resources Manager
Science Writer
Test-Inspection Tech.
Soil Conservationist
Underwater Technician
Veterinarian
Geophysicist/ Physicist Toxicologist
Wildlife Biologist