Awards & Honors

Senior Fellow
  Michael Blanding

  • 2012 Clarion Award for feature article, external publication, with circulation between 100,000-500,000.
  • 2011 Association Media & Publishing EXCEL Awards, Gold Medal, "Re-Writing the Future," Suffolk Alumni Magazine
  • 2006 Livingston Awards for Young Journalists, Finalist, "The Ways of the Gun," Boston Magazine
  • 2005 National Association of Real Estate Editors, First Place, General Circulation Magazine, "The Biggest Bang for the Buck," Boston Magazine
  • 2004 Livingston Awards for Young Journalists, Finalist, "The Great Pretender," Boston Magazine
  • 2004 City and Regional Magazine Association, Bronze Award, Reader Service, "The Healthiest Towns," Boston Magazine
  • 2004 National Association of Real Estate Editors, Second Place, General Circulation Magazine, "The Healthiest Towns," Boston Magazine
  • 2003 Livingston Awards for Young Journalists, Finalist, "The Invisible Harvest," Boston Magazine

Where to find Blanding
  on the Web


Michael Blanding

Michael Blanding

Highlights
Books
Selected Articles

Highlights

MICHAEL BLANDING is an award-winning magazine writer who covers politics, social issues, and travel. His investigative journalism and travel reporting have taken him around the world. He has written for publications including The Nation, The New Republic, Salon.com, Consumers Digest, The Boston Globe Magazine, and Boston Magazine.

In 2010, Blanding published his first book of investigative non-fiction, "The Coke Machine: The Dirty Truth Behind the World's Favorite Soft Drink," (Avery/Penguin, September 2010). It is an exposé on the iconic Coca Cola Company and its record on health, environmental, and labor issues around the world. The Financial Times said about the book: "By this account, Coke's domination of the market begins to look less like a triumph of advertising and more like a symptom of the dark side of globalization."

In his investigative articles, Blanding has explored topics including corporate accountability, immigration, sexual abuse, and prison reform. On projects for Boston Magazine, Blanding examined challenges faced by immigrant women in speaking out about sexual abuse in the workplace, and the systemic problems with arson investigations in Massachusetts that have resulted in wrongful convictions of several innocent men.

Blanding received a City and Regional Magazine Association Award for his article "The Healthiest Towns." He is a three-time finalist for the Livingston Awards, the largest prize for journalists under 35, for his articles "The Ways of the Gun," "The Great Pretender," and "The Invisible Harvest."

A graduate of Williams College, Blanding has taught magazine writing at Emerson College, Northeastern University, and Tufts University.

Books

 The Coke Machine, by Michael Blanding


"The Coke Machine: The Dirty Truth Behind the World's Favorite Soft Drink," Avery/Penguin, September 2010.

Selected Articles

"Up in Smoke," (Boston Magazine, April 2011). One in every five Massachusetts fires used to be blamed on arson. Today it’s something like one in a hundred. What changed? Arson investigation now depends on science rather than instinct. This article tells the story of Jimmie Herbshi, jailed for an arson he didn't commit.

"Crimes Against Illegal Immigrants," (Boston Magazine, December 2010) explains how justice is nearly impossible to come by for immigrant victims of sexual abuse.

"The Long Shadow of Willie Horton," (Boston Globe Sunday Magazine archives, October 18, 2009). More than two decades ago, a governor showed a prisoner leniency, with horrifying results. Our justice system hasn’t been the same since.

"The Ways of the Gun," (Boston Magazine, May 2006). Massachusetts has some of the country’s toughest gun laws. So why is Boston flooded with firearms? The answer lies inside the city’s thriving black market for illegal weapons.

"The Case Against Coke," (The Nation, May 1, 2006) describesglobal campaign against Coca-Cola that is using product bans and lawsuits to shed light on the corporate giant’s exploitation and brutality in Colombia, India and elsewhere.

"Cruel Justice," (Boston Magazine, April 2004) tells of one inmate's experience in the Massachusetts Correctional system.

"The Invisible Harvest" (Boston Magazine, October 2002) explores the hidden world of the migrant farm workers who put food on your table. 


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