OUR REPORTING ON INTERNATIONAL ADOPTION

Corruption in international adoptions

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VIETNAM CASE STUDY
NEPAL CASE STUDY
POLICIES FOR FAIRER PRACTICE
THE LIE WE LOVE: ORPHANS & INTERNATIONAL ADOPTION
OUR COMMENTARY
MAPS
BACKGROUND
READER RESPONSE TO OUR WORK
RESEARCH SOURCES
COUNTRY BY COUNTRY: REPORTS FROM AROUND THE WORLD
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

NOTE: This page from the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism website offers documentation of and background about serious irregularities in international adoption. For the systemic analysis of corruption in international adoption, please read “The Lie We Love,” Foreign Policy magazine, Nov./Dec. 2008, and visit our webpages dedicated to international adoption. For ideas about fairer policy solutions, please read “The Baby Business,” Democracy Journal, Summer 2010.


Vietnam: Resources
 & Related Documents


 Click to follow link United States Department of State
 Click to follow link Embassy of the United States
 Click to follow link Statement from the Embassy of Vietnam deporting Mai-Ly Latrace for child trafficking
Click to follow link International Social Service report on Adoption from Viet Nam
Click to follow link Licensed Adoption Agencies in Vietnam
 Click to follow link Peter Bille Larsen
 Click to follow link Peter Selman













United States Department of State: Intercountry Adoption>Country Information>Vietnam

Embassy of the United States: Hanoi, Vietnam, Adopted Children Immigrant Visa Unit

Licensed Adoption Agencies in Vietnam

Licensed adoption agencies listed by province, 2006-2008, Parents for Ethical Adoption

Adoption agencies licensed to work in Vietnam, 2006-2008, Parents for Ethical Adoption

The Embassy of Vietnam’s statement that Mai-Ly Latrace was deported in 2002 because she was “a child trafficker for money.”

Order Granting Summary Judgement in case of Mai-Ly Trace vs. Judith Mosely and Carrie West

International Social Service report on Adoption from Viet Nam, 2009.

Peter Bille Larsen is a social anthropologist and consultant based in Switzerland.

In the following articles, Larsen reports that when he was in Vietnam on unrelated research, five illiterate women of the Ruc ethnic group approached him asking for help getting their children back. Larsen says these women told him that Vietnamese officials had persuaded them to leave their children in an institution for food and education; now they feared they would not see children again. These articles report on his experiences and argue that these children—apparently adopted internationally—should be returned to their birth families.

Peter Selman is a visiting fellow at Britain’s Newcastle University and chair of the Network for Intercountry Adoption. He is editor of "Intercountry Adoption: Developments, Trends, and Perspectives."   

Analyzes data related about 20 developed countries’s adoptions from other countries. Notes that between 1998 and 2004, intercountry adoption increased 42 per cent. Discusses the problems in collecting and analyzing the data.

Outlines the author’s estimate of the number of intercountry adoptions worldwide, using data recorded in the 1990s by 18 nations that adopted children from other countries. According to author’s estimate, there were at least 32,000 intercountry adoptions in 1998, a rise of fifty percent over the previous decade.


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Last page update: April 7, 2011