Master of Arts Degree in Teaching Hebrew

The goal of this program is to provide teachers and students with the knowledge and training to become teachers of the Hebrew language at all levels, i.e. elementary, secondary, post secondary and adult education.

In this program we will emphasize the different areas that any Hebrew teacher should master to teach in a variety of frameworks. These include both the theoretical knowledge of learning and teaching Hebrew, as well as hands-on experience in teaching.

This particular program is designed to meet the needs of both learners and those communities that wish to include Hebrew as part of their curriculum. We are committed to equipping each of its learners with the appropriate tools to enable them to confront these challenges.

Candidates who apply to the program are expected to have competence in Hebrew at least at the Advanced-Mid level, which is defined in the ACTFL guidelines. We believe that this level is adequate for the teaching of a language. We also hope that during their tenure, candidates will take advantage of our superior level Hebrew courses in order to improve their language skills.

The Program

The degree of Master of Arts in teaching Hebrew is offered to provide teachers and students with the knowledge and training to become teachers of the Hebrew language at all levels, i.e., elementary, secondary, post-secondary and adult education. In this program we emphasize the different areas that any Hebrew teacher should master to teach in a variety of frameworks. These include the theoretical knowledge of learning and teaching Hebrew, as well as hands-on experience in teaching. We are committed to equipping each student with the necessary tools to confront the challenges of teaching Hebrew at a variety of levels. This program is the first of its kind in the United States and addresses the urgent need for qualified Hebrew teachers in Jewish education.

Our two-year program focuses on different skills that we believe professional Hebrew educators should master. We emphasize theoretical and methodological learning, as well as hands-on experience and rigorous field training. The curriculum consists of 12 courses and two semesters of practicum training. Seven of the 12 required courses focus exclusively on different aspects of teaching and learning the Hebrew language. Such courses focus on theories of language acquisition, instructional methodologies, curriculum development, development of teaching materials, learner assessment, classroom management and conducting research. The remaining course requirements include enrichment courses such as biblical texts, modern Hebrew literature, the history of the Hebrew language, as well as courses that prepare students to teach specifically in Jewish settings.

The practicum training component of the curriculum, which closely accompanies the coursework, provides students an opportunity to practice their teaching, in formal and informal education, as well as in different settings such as day schools, afternoon schools, elementary and high schools.

Requirements

Required Courses

  • HBRW 167b The Revival of Modern Hebrew
  • NEJS 104a (formerly108b) Comparative Grammar of Semitic Languages
  • HBRW 168a Proficiency Based Instruction in Hebrew, Part 1
  • HBRW 168b Proficiency Based Instruction in Hebrew, Part 2
  • HBRW 303a Assessing the Learning and Teaching of Hebrew
  • JCS 222b Teaching Jewish Texts
  • JCS 234b Curriculum, Theory, and Development
  • JCS 235a The Culture of Jewish Educational Settings

Required Practicum Courses

  • HBRW 301a Practicum I
  • HBRW 301b Practicum II
  • Four elective courses (one from each area below):

Psychology

  • PSYC 130b Life Span Development: Adulthood and Old Age
  • PSYC 132a Children's Play and the Developing Imagination

Jewish Education

  • JCS 206b Informal Education in Jewish Settings
  • JCS 215a The Developing Learner in a Jewish Educational Setting
  • JCS 236a Teaching and Learning in Jewish Classrooms

Biblical Texts in Hebrew

  • HBRW 122a and 122b Introduction to Classical Hebrew
  • NEJS 10a (formerly 72a) Texts from the Hebrew Bible
  • NEJS 110b The Hebrew Bible: Meaning and Context
  • NEJS 114a The Book of Amos
  • NEJS 114b Biblical Ritual, Cult, and Magic
  • NEJS 115a The Book of Deuteronomy
  • NEJS 117b The Dead Sea Scrolls
  • NEJS 118b The Book of Psalms
  • NEJS 122b Biblical Narrative Texts: The Historical Tradition
  • NEJS 210a (formerly 201b) Exodus: A Study in Method
  • NEJS 208a (formerly 210b) Biblical Hebrew Composition

Hebrew Literature

  • HBRW 123a and 123b Introduction to Modern Hebrew Literature
  • HBRW 143a and 143b An Advanced Survey of Hebrew and Israeli Literature
  • HBRW 144a Hebrew Drama
  • HBRW 146a Voices of Jerusalem
  • HBRW 164b Israeli Theater
  • NEJS 177b (formerly 139b) Yehuda Amichai and Contemporary Hebrew Poetry
  • NEJS 178a Hebrew Poetry between the Two World Wars
  • NEJS 180b Hebrew Prose in an Era of Revival