An interdepartmental program in East Asian Studies

Last updated: July 31, 2014 at 3:50 p.m.

Objectives

The East Asian Studies Program (EAS) is an interdisciplinary program that seeks to give the student broad yet intimate knowledge of East Asian civilization. It can be taken either as a major or a minor.  A core element of the program is the requirement of an East Asian language, providing the basis for postgraduate study or careers relating to East Asia.

Learning Goals

East Asian Studies promotes in-depth knowledge about the traditions, cultures, and contemporary societies of a diverse and dynamic region that plays an ever more prominent role on the global stage. The Major focuses particular attention on China and Japan, but Southeast Asia and Korea are also part of the Major’s coverage. Students are exposed to a wide range of disciplinary approaches to the study of East Asia, including Anthropology, Art History, Economics, History, Language and Literature, Philosophy, Politics, Religion, and Music History. Besides being interdisciplinarity, EAS emphasizes a broad temporal scope, cultivating interests from ancient times to the present. Students completing the major are expected to become conversant about a wide range of topics related to East Asia and to attain basic competence in at least one East Asian language.

As a regional studies program, EAS encourages participation in global learning, offering non-Eurocentric approaches to the Creative Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences. Through exposure to East Asia, students sharpen their critical skills regarding insights and the production of knowledge beyond Western traditions. The objects of inquiry include poetic styles, artistic techniques, intellectual trends, gender constructs, political orders, and economic systems. While understanding East Asia in its own context is a primary goal, the Major also seeks to comprehend the particularities of East Asia in relation to European and American ideas and influences where relevant. The goal is to develop dynamic and nuanced concepts about the role of East Asia in the world.

Through the ages, many parts of East Asia have had varied and extensive contact. By offering courses on different geographic sites and cultures, sometimes in a comparative or interactive context, EAS cultivates a deep appreciation for trans-Asiatic and intra-Asiatic forms of knowledge and action. Cooperation, conflicts, and interdependencies are vital parts of the study of significant historical and evolving developments across the region.

Core Skills: A student choosing the EAS major is expected to achieve the following skills:

  • Master the terminology and methodology of the component disciplines,
  • Develop proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, and writing at least one East Asian language,
  • Examine phenomena in specific historical, cultural, economic, and political contexts,
  • Use primary and secondary sources to produce original arguments and analyses,
  • Think critically about visual, literary, and intellectual artifacts and documents,
  • Readily make connections from comparative and transcultural perspectives.

Knowledge: An EAS major is expected to acquire the following types of knowledge (encompassing the range of disciplines):

  • Broad understanding of traditional and contemporary East Asia from local, international, and comparative perspectives,
  • East Asian experiences in History, Economics, Politics, and Culture,
  • Robust appreciation of the contribution and relationship of East Asia to the world.

Social Awareness: A Major in EAS should:

  • appreciate cultural and ethnic tolerance and inclusiveness,
  • cultivate relations with peers and faculty who come from diverse backgrounds.

Upon Graduating: A Brandeis EAS major will be prepared to:

  • Pursue professions where knowledge of East Asian languages and culture is valuable (e.g. education, diplomacy, international finance and business, journalism, museology, and translation),
  • Embark upon graduate study in a number of academic disciplines,
  • Build bridges between American and East Asian communities or between communities within East Asia.

How to Become a Major or a Minor

To enroll in the program, either as a major or a minor, students must bring the declaration form to the UAH or program administrator. A faculty advisor will be assigned then.

Committee

Aida Yuen Wong, Chair, Undergraduate Advising Head and Study Abroad Liaison
(Fine Arts)

Yu-Hui Chang
(Music)

Yu Feng (on leave fall 2014)
(German, Russian, and Asian Languages and Literature)

Matthew Fraleigh
(German, Russian, and Asian Languages and Literature)

Xing Hang (on leave spring 2015)
(History)

Donald Hindley
(Politics)

Gary Jefferson
(Economics)

Xiwen Lu
(German, Russian, and Asian Languages and Literature)

Yukimi Nakano
(German, Russian, and Asian Languages and Literature)

Ellen Schattschneider
(Anthropology) 

Ralph Thaxton
(Politics)

Pu Wang
(German, Russian, and Asian Languages and Literature)

Hong Yan
(German, Russian, and Asian Languages and Literature)

Affiliated Faculty (contributing to the curriculum, advising and administration of the department or program)
Yu-Hui Chang (Music)
Yu Feng (German, Russian, and Asian Languages and Literature)
Matthew Fraleigh (German, Russian, and Asian Languages and Literature)
Donald Hindley (Politics)
Gary Jefferson (Economics)
Xiwen Lu (German, Russian, and Asian Languages and Literature)
Yukimi Nakano (German, Russian, and Asian Languages and Literature)
Ralph Thaxton (Politics)
Aida Yuen Wong (Fine Arts)

Requirements for the Minor

Five courses are generally required to complete the EAS minor. All courses used to fulfill the EAS minor degree requirements must be passed with a C- or higher.

A. Core Course: HIST 80a (Introduction to East Asian Civilization).

B. Language Requirement: at least up to CHIN 20b or JAPN 20b, or by exemption. Students with demonstrated language skills at the 20-level or are native speakers may be exempted from this requirement by application and/or exam.

An RG04 form is used to apply for EAS language requirement exemption in East Asian languages offered at Brandeis; but for East Asian languages not offered at Brandeis (Korean) a Foreign Language Exemption Petition is needed. Exams may be necessary in either case.

C. Electives: Generally three EAS electives from no fewer than two different departments are needed to complete this requirement; however students who are exempted from the language requirement must complete four electives. East Asian language courses at the 20-level or higher which are not used toward fulfilling the language requirement may be used as electives for the minor degree; however, at least one elective must be an EAS non-language course taken outside the GRALL Department.

D. No more than two courses (one, if language exemption is earned) taken outside of Brandeis may be counted for the minor.

E. No course taken pass/fail may count toward the minor requirements.

Requirements for the Major

Ten courses are generally required to complete the EAS major. At least six courses are required to be taken in residence at Brandeis and all courses used to fulfill the EAS major degree requirements must be passed with a C- or higher.

A. Core Course: HIST 80a (Introduction to East Asian Civilization).

B. Language Requirement: at least up to CHIN 40b or JAPN 40b, or by exemption. Students with demonstrated language skills at the 40 level or are native speakers may be exempted from this requirement by application and/or exam.

The procedures for applying for language exemption for the major are the same as those for the minor.

C. Electives: Three EAS electives selected from the creative arts, humanities, and the social science courses listed below.

For humanities courses that are languages, only courses above the 40-level may be counted toward fulfilling this specific elective requirement.

D. Generally five additional EAS electives are required; however students who are exempted from the language requirement must complete six electives. East Asian language courses (such as in a second EAS language area) at the 20-level or higher which are not used toward fulfilling the language requirement may be used as electives for the major degree; however, at least one elective must be an EAS non-language course taken outside the GRALL Department.

E. No more than four (three, if language exempt is earned) courses taken outside of Brandeis may be counted for the major

F. No course taken pass/fail may count toward the major requirements.

Honors
Candidates for honors are required to register for EAS 99d (or for a 99 course in an appropriate department) and to prepare an honors thesis on a topic relating to East Asia. If completed successfully, the 99 can be counted as two of the five (six) EAS electives needed for the major.

Courses of Instruction

(1-99) Primarily for Undergraduate Students

EAS 98a Independent Study
Usually offered every year.
Staff

EAS 98b Independent Study
Usually offered every year.
Staff

EAS 99d Senior Research
Seniors who are candidates for degrees with honors in East Asian studies must register for this course and, under the direction of a faculty member, prepare an honors thesis on a suitable topic. Usually offered every year.
Staff

East Asian Studies: Core Course

HIST 80a Introduction to East Asian Civilization
[ hum nw ss ]
A selective introduction to the development of forms of thought, social and political institutions, and distinctive cultural contributions of China and Japan from early times to the beginning of the nineteenth century. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Hang

East Asian Studies: Language Requirement Courses

CHIN 10a Beginning Chinese I
Four class hours per week.
Mandarin is taught in this intensive course, intended for students with no previous knowledge of Chinese. Class meets four days per week plus one section of individual conversation. It offers training in basic Chinese grammar, speaking, aural comprehension, reading and writing. Chinese characters, and the "pinyin" phonetic system as a tool for learning Chinese. Usually offered every fall.
Mr. Feng

CHIN 20b Continuing Chinese
Prerequisite: CHIN 10a. Four class hours per week.
Continuation of CHIN 10a. Usually offered every spring.
Staff

CHIN 29b Pathways for Chinese Literacy
For students who have significant bilingual background in Mandarin Chinese or a non-Mandarin dialect (e.g., Cantonese). Emphasizes reading and writing skills, but standard Mandarin pronunciation and grammatical structure are also stressed. Students who successfully complete this course can take an exemption test to fulfill the foreign language requirement or continue to the next level. Usually offered every spring.
Staff

CHIN 30a Intermediate Chinese
[ fl ]
Prerequisite: CHIN 20b or equivalent. Four class hours per week.
Development of skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, including the writing of short essays. Usually offered every fall.
Staff

CHIN 40b Advanced Intermediate Chinese
[ fl hum ]
Prerequisite: CHIN 30a or equivalent. Four class hours per week.
Continuation of CHIN 30a. Usually offered every spring.
Staff

JAPN 10a Beginning Japanese
Meets five days per week for a total of five class hours per week.
Intended for students with little or no previous knowledge of Japanese. This course offers intensive training in the basics of Japanese grammar, listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Students acquire Japanese language proficiency through various interactive classroom activities, workbook, audio, video, and computer-assisted exercises. Usually offered every fall.
Ms. Fujiwara

JAPN 20b Continuing Japanese
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in JAPN 10a or the equivalent. Meets five days per week for a total of five class hours per week.
Continuation of JAPN 10a. Usually offered every spring.
Ms. Fujiwara

JAPN 30a Intermediate Japanese
[ fl ]
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in JAPN 20b or the equivalent. Meets five days per week for a total of five class hours per week.
Continuation of JAPN 20b. This course aims to further develop a student's four language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Japanese through various classroom activities, workbook, audio, video, and writing essays. Usually offered every fall.
Ms. Fujiwara

JAPN 40b Advanced Intermediate Japanese
[ fl hum ]
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in JAPN 30a or the equivalent. Meets five days per week for a total of five class hours per week.
Continuation of JAPN 30a with more emphasis on reading and writing. Usually offered every spring.
Ms. Fujiwara

East Asian Studies: Creative Arts and Humanities Electives

CHIN 98a Readings in Modern Chinese
Prerequisite: CHIN 40b or equivalent.
A continuation of CHIN 40b. Includes an introduction to readings in modern Chinese literature. Usually offered every year.
Staff

CHIN 98b Readings in Modern Chinese
Prerequisite: CHIN 40b or equivalent.
A continuation of CHIN 98a. Usually offered every year.
Staff

CHIN 100a Introduction to Chinese Literature: Desire and Form
[ hum nw ]
Introduces Chinese literature, focusing primarily on Chinese "classical" literary traditions and their metamorphosis in modern times. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Wang

CHIN 105a Advanced Conversation and Composition I
[ fl hum wi ]
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in CHIN 40b or the equivalent.
Designed for advanced students who wish to enhance and improve their skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing through listening and reading authentic or slightly modified materials, discussing and writing on various topics of Chinese society and culture. Usually offered every fall.
Staff

CHIN 105b Advanced Conversation and Composition II
[ fl hum wi ]
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in CHIN 105a or the equivalent.
Designed for advanced students who wish to enhance and improve their speaking proficiency and writing skills. Speaking skills will be developed through guided conversation, discussion of texts and films, and oral presentation. Exercises and essays will be used to improve students' writing skills. Usually offered every spring.
Staff

CHIN 106b Business Chinese and Culture
[ fl hum nw wi ]
Prerequisite: CHIN 40b or equivalent.
An advanced Chinese course where students develop their language proficiency and cultural knowledge in professional settings such as the workplace. The course is conducted entirely in Chinese and is designed for students who want to sharpen their language skills and reach a higher level of proficiency in which they are able to read newspapers, magazines, or professional documents, as well as to improve their communicative ability and enhance their self-confidence in Chinese workplaces. Usually offered every second spring.
Staff

CHIN 120a Readings in Contemporary Chinese Literature: Advanced Chinese Language
[ fl hum wi ]
Prerequisite: CHIN 105a or equivalent.
For advanced students of Chinese, an introduction to contemporary Chinese short stories from the 1990s and later. Focuses on significant expansion of vocabulary and grammar, and on providing students an opportunity to develop and polish both oral and written skills through class discussion, presentations, and writing assignments. Usually offered every fall.
Staff

CHIN 120b Readings in Contemporary Chinese Literature: Advanced Chinese Language II
[ fl hum wi ]
Prerequisite: CHIN 120a or equivalent.
Continuation of CHIN 120a. Study of contemporary Chinese short stories from the 1990s and later. These stories not only represent new literary themes and linguistic expressions, but also reflect the modernization, commercialization, and urbanization that is transforming China. The course improves students' knowledge of the language, as well as enhancing their understanding of Chinese society and culture. Usually offered every spring.
Staff

CHIN 130b China on Film: The Changes of Chinese Culture
[ hum nw ]
Taught in English. All films viewed have English subtitles.
Focuses on the enormous changes under way in Chinese society, politics, and culture. Helps students to identify and understand these fundamental transformations through a representative, exciting selection of readings and films. Usually offered every second spring.
Staff

CHIN 136b Chinese Modernism in International Context
[ hum nw ]
Taught in English.
Examines the origins, recurrences, and metamorphosis of modernistic styles and movements in twentieth-century Chinese literature, film, fine art, and intellectual discourses. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Wang

CHIN 140a Yin Yu Tang Documents, Decoding the Late Qing and Early Republic Writings (I)
[ hum nw ]
Prerequisites: CHIN 120a and 120b, or permission of the instructor.
Teaches fundamental skills to decode the late Qing and early Republic writings in print or in hand-writing by recognizing and translating the Yin Yu Tang documents. Students of this course will also gain knowledge of Chinese society and culture of this period. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Feng

CHIN 200a Practical Chinese Phonetics, Lexics, Syntax, and Pragmatics
Prerequisite: Fluency in Chinese and ability to read Chinese books and articles. Required of all students in MAT Chinese.
Focuses on the fundamental characteristics of modern Chinese language with emphasis on pronunciation and grammar structure. Usually offered every year.
Staff

CHIN 201a Chinese Pedagogy I
Required of all students in MAT Chinese and MATCC.
Equips students with the most advanced and updated skills in teaching modern Chinese with an emphasis on beginning and intermediate levels. This course covers a great range of topics to ensure efficient and successful instruction. Usually offered every year.
Staff

CHIN 202b Chinese Pedagogy II
Prerequisite: CHIN 201a. Required of MATCC students.
Continuation of CHIN 201a. Emphasizes the instruction of advanced Chinese. Two important sets of theories and practice will be introduced and discussed, the Four Subsystem Theory and Prosodic Theory. Task-based teaching on an advanced level, contents-centered textbook, and correction of advanced composition will also be discussed. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Feng

CLAS/FA 186a The Art and Archaeology of Korea
[ ca hum nw ]
Surveys the art, archaeology, and architecture of Korea from the Prehistoric period to the twentieth century. We will conceptualize the study of Korean material culture by highlighting striking parallels with ancient Greece. This course emphasizes the Korean peninsula's unique geographic placement in East Asia. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Koh

FA 34a History of Asian Art
[ ca nw ]
May not be taken for credit by students who took FA 12a in prior years.
A selective survey of the art of the three major Asian areas: India, China, and Japan. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Wong

FA 70b The Art of China
[ ca nw ]
May not be taken for credit by students who took FA 182a in prior years.
A survey of Chinese art from antiquity to the Ch'ing dynasty. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Wong

FA 71b The Art of Japan
[ ca nw ]
May not be taken for credit by students who took FA 181b in prior years.
A survey of Japanese art from antiquity to the modern period. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Wong

FA 170a Arts of the Ming Dynasty
[ ca nw ]
May not be taken for credit by students who took FA 15b in prior years.
Examines a broad array of arts from the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). The first half of the course focuses on activities in and around the Chinese court. The second half concentrates on monuments related to literati and popular cultures. Usually offered every three years.
Ms. Wong

FA 171b Buddhist Art
[ ca nw ]
May not be taken for credit by students who took FA 13b in prior years.
The history of Buddhist art on the Silk Road. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Wong

FA 197a Studies in Asian Art
[ ca nw ]
May not be taken for credit by students who took FA 184a in prior years.
Usually offered every third year.
Ms. Wong

JAPN 98a Readings in Japanese
Prerequisite: JAPN 40b or the equivalent.
Usually offered every year.
Ms. Fujiwara

JAPN 98b Readings in Japanese
Prerequisite: JAPN 40b or the equivalent.
Usually offered every year.
Ms. Fujiwara

JAPN 105a Advanced Conversation and Composition I
[ fl hum wi ]
Prerequisite: JAPN 40b or the equivalent. Four class hours per week.
Designed for advanced students of Japanese who wish to enhance and improve their skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will develop their proficiency in writing, reading, and speaking through reading and discussion of Japanese texts on various topics of relevance. Listening and speaking skills are reinforced through audio, video, guided conversation, discussion of texts, and oral presentation. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Fujiwara

JAPN 105b Advanced Conversation and Composition II
[ fl hum wi ]
Four class hours per week.
Continuation of JAPN 105a. For advanced students of Japanese who wish to enhance and improve their speaking proficiency as well as reading and writing skills. Speaking skills will be developed through conversation, discussion of texts and films, and oral presentation. Various reading topics on Japanese culture and various forms of writing will be assigned to improve students' reading and writing skills. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Fujiwara

JAPN 120a Readings in Contemporary Japanese Literature
[ fl hum nw wi ]
Prerequisite: JAPN 105B or the equivalent.
Provides advanced students of Japanese an opportunity to develop reading and writing skills through class discussion, presentation, group work and writing. Familiarizes students with different facets of contemporary Japanese culture and society. Readings are supplemented by films and related visual materials. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Fujiwara

JAPN 120b Readings in Modern Japanese Literature
[ fl hum nw wi ]
Prerequisite: JAPN 120a or the equivalent.
Provides advanced students of Japanese with broad introduction to contemporary Japanese literary work that is widely read in Japan. Focuses on significant expansion of vocabulary and grammar improving students' knowledge of the language as well as enhancing their understanding of Japanese culture and society. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Nakano

JAPN 125b Putting Away Childish Things: Coming of Age in Modern Japanese Literature and Film
[ hum nw ]
Explores the ways in which modern Japanese writers and filmmakers have represented childhood, youth, and coming of age. A variety of short stories, novels, and memoirs from the 1890s to the present day are read, and several recent films are also screened. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Fraleigh

JAPN 130a The Literature of Multicultural Japan
[ hum nw ]
"Multicultural" may not be an adjective that many associate with Japan, but as we will find in this class, Japan's modern literary and cinematic tradition is rich with works by and about resident Koreans, Ainu, Okinawans, outcasts, and sexual and other marginalized minorities. Why then does the image of a monocultural Japan remain so resilient? Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Fraleigh

JAPN 135a Screening National Images: Japanese Film and Anime in Global Context
[ hum nw ]
All films and readings are in English.
An introduction to some major directors and works of postwar Japanese film and anime with special attention to such issues as genre, medium, adaptation, narrative, and the circulation of national images in the global setting. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Fraleigh

JAPN 145a The World of Classical Japanese Literature
[ hum nw ]
A survey of some of the most important works of Japanese literature from its origins to the late sixteenth century, including a wide range of genres: fiction, essays, travelogues, poetry, and drama. All readings are in English. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Fraleigh

MUS 4a Introduction to Chinese Music and Its Development in the Modern Era
[ ca nw ]
Open to all students; no musical background is required.
A general introduction to the history and practice of Chinese music, with a focus on existing musical activities. Specific topics include instrumental music, folk and dance music, musical drama and narrative, ritual and religious music, interaction with Western music, popular music, musical aesthetics and ideology, and music of ethnic minorities. Through listening, reading, and class discussion, students explore different musical genres and gain an understanding and appreciation of Chinese music idiom, as well as a general picture of how music lives and functions in Chinese-speaking communities. Usually offered every third year.
Ms. Chang

REL 161a Chinese Religion and Thought: Understanding Confucianism and Daoism (Taoism)
[ hum nw ]
This course aims at widening and deepening students' knowledge of world religions by introducing to them distinctive Chinese religions and schools of thought with emphasis on two most significant ones, namely, Confucianism and Taoism. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Feng

THA 146a Performing Asia: Theatre and Drama across a Continent
[ ca nw ]
Explores the multiple facets of Asian theater as an historical and literary presence as well as the practical creative process. We will examine a number of theatrical styles from various regions throughout Asia as well as the Middle East. The course is designed specifically as an introduction to the various aspects of Asian theater, including the basis of performance such as playwriting, acting, direction and design. Usually offered every third year.
Staff

East Asian Studies: Social Science Electives

ECON 30a The Economy of China
[ nw ss ]
Prerequisite: ECON 2a or 10a.
Analysis of China's economic transformation with particular emphasis on China's economic reforms since 1978, including the restructuring of its enterprise, fiscal, financial, and political systems and the roles of trade, foreign investment, and technology in driving China's economic advance. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Jefferson

HIST 80b East Asia: Nineteenth Century to the Present (China and Japan)
[ hum nw ss ]
The civilization of East Asia at the beginning of the nineteenth century, the impact of the West, the contrasting responses of China and Japan to the confrontation, and the development and nature of their present societies. Usually offered every year.
Mr. James

HIST 173a World War II in East Asia
[ ss ]
Traces the origins and outcomes of World War II in East Asia with a focus on military and political history. Also looks at the war's effect on society, economy, and culture, as well as individuals' experience and memory of war. Special one-time offering, spring 2015.
Mr. Pieragastini

HIST 176a The Emergence of Modern Japan
[ nw ss ]
A general introduction to Japan's modern transformation from a late feudal society into a powerful nation-state capable of challenging the Western powers. Particular attention is given to feudal legacies, rapid economic growth, nationalism and ultranationalism, the "Pacific War" between Japan and the United States, the meaning of defeat, issues of postwar democracy, and the workings of the postwar political economy. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. James

HIST 176b Japan and Korea in Modern World History
[ nw ss ]
Investigates the long and problematic history of interactions and exchanges between Japan and Korea from early times to the present. Topics include language, migration, art, architecture, material culture, popular culture, propaganda, and warfare. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. James

HIST 180a The Global Opium Trade: 1755-Present
[ nw ss ]
Investigates the history of the opium trade from early times to present. Coverage will include the Anglo-Indian opium trade, the Opium Wars; the political economy of the legal trade; and the complex ramifications of its prohibition. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. James

HIST 182a Mao: The Man, the Myth, and the Milieu
[ nw ss wi ]
Examines the life of Mao Zedong, arguably twentieth-century China's paramount leader, visionary, and autocrat. We further place him within the tumultuous political, social, and intellectual history of modern China since 1840 and ponder his legacy for today's world. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Hang

HIST 182b Modern China
[ nw ss ]
Surveys Chinese history from the Ming to Mao, with an emphasis on political, social, cultural, and literary trends; and attention toward ethnic minorities and overseas communities and diaspora. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Hang

HIST 183a Empire at the Margins: Borderlands in Late Imperial China
[ nw ss wi ]
Explores Ming and Qing China's frontiers with Japan, Korea, Inner Asia, Vietnam, and the ocean from the fifteenth to nineteenth centuries, examining the role of borderlands in forging the present-day multiethnic Chinese state and East Asian national identities. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Hang

HIST 184a Silk, Silver, and Slaves: China and the Industrial Revolution
[ nw ss wi ]
Examines why industrial capitalism, which underpins the current world order, first developed in Western Europe rather than China. Comparative treatment of commercialization, material culture, cities, political economies, and contingencies on both ends of Eurasia in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Hang

HIST 185a The China Outside China: Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Diaspora in the Making of Modern China
[ nw ss wi ]
Studies the history of Chinese outside Mainland China, from Hong Kong and Taiwan to Siberia and Africa, from fifteenth century to present day. Ambivalence to ancestral and adopted homelands made these communities valuable agents of transnational exchange and embodiments of Chinese modernity. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Hang

POL 146b Seminar: Topics in Revolutions in the Third World
[ nw ss ]
May be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor.
Explores revolutionary situations, revolutionary movements (successful and unsuccessful), and revolutionary regimes in the Third World since World War II. Specific topics may vary from year to year. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Hindley

POL 147a The Government and Politics of China
[ nw ss ]
Introduction to major themes of Chinese politics, emphasizing the rise of the Chinese Communists and the post-1949 trends in domestic politics, while also surveying historical, sociological, and cultural influences in Chinese politics. Attention to the nature of the traditional state, impact of colonialism, national revolution, and the course of contemporary state development. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Thaxton

POL 148a Seminar: Contemporary Chinese Politics
[ nw ss ]
A broad and in-depth understanding of key issues in contemporary Chinese politics--China after 1949. Emphasis on the role of the state in promoting economic development, social betterment, political stability, and justice. Special attention to the Tiananmen Protest Movement of 1989. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Thaxton

POL 150a Politics of Southeast Asia
[ nw ss ]
Introduction to the politics of modern Southeast Asia, with the focus on the indigenous peoples and their cultures, societies, and histories. The greatly changed and changing political systems of Indonesia and Thailand are examined individually in some depth. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Hindley

POL 167a United States and China in World Politics
[ ss ]
Issues in U.S.-China relations, including Taiwan and Tibet, the formation of a Greater China, military security and use of nuclear weapons, human rights, Chinese and American versions of nationalism and internationalism, and others. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Thaxton

POL 179a China's Global Rise: The Challenge to Democratic Order
[ ss ]
Explores the implications of China's global rise for the global democratic order constructed by the United States in the aftermath of World War II. Among other issues, we will ask whether China's international strategy in Asia, Africa, and Latin America poses a serious challenge to democratic nations and their support for democratization. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Thaxton

REL 151a The Buddha: His Life and Teachings
[ hum nw ]
Few human beings have had as much impact on the world as Siddhartha Gotama Shakyamuni, known to us as Buddha. This course explores his life and teachings as reflected in early Buddhist literature and Western scholarship. Usually offered every year.
Staff