Interdepartmental programs in Education

Last updated: September 10, 2014 at 3:13 p.m.

Objectives

The Education Program offers several different undergraduate and graduate programs. Undergraduate students are able to select a path to pursue either education studies (major or minor) or teacher education (minor in elementary, middle, or high school teaching). For students who have already earned an undergraduate degree, the Brandeis Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program offers concentrations in elementary teaching (public or Jewish day school) or secondary—middle or high school—teaching (biology, chemistry, Chinese, English, history, mathematics, physics, or Bible/Tanakh). For a more complete description of the education program, please consult the program's Web site, www.brandeis.edu/programs/education.

Any undergraduate at Brandeis may begin fulfilling requirements of the major or minor at any time, without formal admission. However, it is strongly recommended that students who are considering the education program meet with an education program advisor during their first year in order to plan for program requirements. Permission, which is required to enroll in the education studies major or minor and the teacher education minor, should be sought no later than when a student has completed two education courses.

Undergraduate Education Studies Major
The education studies major is designed for students interested in the social, historical, and cultural contexts of education and the role of education in shaping policy, practice, learning, and identity. This major encourages students to think critically about such questions as: How do various political, economic, historical, psychological, and social forces shape education and public expectations for school? What does school teach us about society? How do K-12 schooling and higher education shape individual and communal identities and life opportunities? How can we better understand and guide learning in and out of school? What kinds of learning, schools, and teachers do young people need and deserve?

A Brandeis graduate with an education studies major will be prepared to pursue:

  • education policy, legislative, or nonprofit work;
  • careers in education-related fields such as school psychology, higher education, informal education, museum education;
  • graduate study and a career in teaching; and/or
  • graduate study and a scholarly career in education.

In addition to developing skills and habits of inquiry, critical thinking, and analysis associated with a strong liberal arts education, education studies majors will acquire a historical and comparative understanding of schooling, a deeper understanding of teaching and learning, educational research skills, and an understanding of the ethical dimensions of education.

Because candidates for the education studies major must complete nine courses, including a senior seminar, students should consult with an education studies advisor no later than the beginning of the junior year about the program requirements. No course for the major may be taken on a pass/fail basis. Students must receive a grade of C- or higher for any course to be counted as part of the education studies major.

Please note that the education studies major does not lead to a teaching license. Students interested in becoming licensed as teachers need to enroll in the teacher education program.

Undergraduate Education Studies Minor
This minor gives students a chance to explore the impact of political, historical, psychological, economic, and social forces that shape education and public expectations for schools. The minor's interdisciplinary approach is suitable both for students interested in the broad social and cultural contexts of education and for those interested in educational careers.  

Students must receive a grade of C- or higher for any course to be counted as part of the education studies minor.  Please note that the education studies minor does not lead to a teaching license. Students interested in becoming teachers need to enroll in the teacher education program.

Undergraduate Teaching Minor
The undergraduate education program leading to licensure is designed to prepare students for teaching at the preschool, elementary, or secondary level, and is taken in addition to the student's major. Those interested in this minor should meet with an education program advisor during their first year to develop a plan for teacher education courses which begin in the sophomore year and other required courses. Please see the education program Web site for specific course requirements. This minor is also valuable for those planning careers in related fields, such as special education.

Four central themes define the Brandeis teacher education programs. These themes are woven throughout our courses:

Knowing Students as Learners
Good teachers work actively to know their students as individuals and learners. They use their knowledge of child development and learning, and their knowledge of individual students, to inform their planning and teaching.

Inquiry
Effective teachers continually assess and reflect on their own teaching practices and stay aware of current resources and information related to teaching and learning. Teachers need to have a firm grounding in educational research, theory and practice, and understand the ways in which inquiry and reflection on research, including their own classroom research, can inform practice.

Teaching for Understanding
Good teachers communicate high standards and expectations for student learning, and draw on an exploration of rich content and a repertoire of approaches, using instructional strategies to make knowledge accessible and interesting to diverse learners. Effective educators build on and extend students’ ideas, monitor their students’ intellectual engagement, and take steps to challenge or re-engage each student in learning.

Social Justice
Issues of social justice and injustice affect schools. Effective teachers strive to narrow the achievement gap between students through their use of standards-based, learning-centered curricula. Teachers need to work toward greater equity and access to knowledge for all students, while creating multicultural, democratic classrooms that celebrate respect and diversity.

Candidates for the elementary or secondary teaching license must achieve a grade of at least B- in all required undergraduate teacher education courses. Satisfactory grades and permission of the education program advisor (elementary) or director (preschool and secondary) are required in order to proceed to the final semesters of the program (ED 101a and b, ED 105a, and ED 111e for elementary; or ED 102a, ED 104a, or 200-level pedagogy class, and ED 110e for secondary; or ED 112e for preschool).

Students who successfully complete the elementary, middle, or high school teacher education program, including the requirements set by the state of Massachusetts (including passing appropriate portions of the Mass. Test for Teacher Licensure—MTEL), may be recommended by Brandeis for initial licensure to teach in Massachusetts. The state of Massachusetts has reciprocal licensing arrangements with the other states and the District of Columbia. Information on licensure requirements may be found on the education program Web site, www.brandeis.edu/programs/education

Of the students who completed the Brandeis teacher education program and took the MTEL tests between 2007-08 and 2009-10, 97 percent passed the Communications and Literacy Skills test, and 97 percent passed the Subject Matter Knowledge tests.

Master of Arts in Teaching
In the MAT program, we conceive of teaching as practical intellectual work dedicated to enlargement of human capacity at the individual and societal level.  Successful completion of the program leads to the degree and (with the exception of the secondary Bible concentration) the initial license to teach in Massachusetts, which has reciprocity agreements with the other states and the District of Columbia. This is a four semester (summer, fall, spring, summer), 52 credit masters program.

The MAT in elementary education offers a choice of two concentrations: public elementary or Jewish day schools (the DeLeT program). The MAT in secondary education offers a choice of several concentrations: biology, chemistry, Chinese, English, history, mathematics, physics, or Bible/Tanakh. In all concentrations, a coherent one-year/four-semester course of study integrates sustained guided-teaching practice in area schools with challenging course work and analysis of educational problems and issues at macro and micro levels. In each concentration, a small cohort of students works closely with peers, mentors, and faculty in an atmosphere that is collegial and open to risk-taking. Inquiry is a theme across the year.  As the culminating project, students design, conduct, and report on a classroom-based, research project. All graduates are expected to demonstrate strong conceptual and practical command of the field; commitment to children as learners and thinkers; and habits of reliance on reason, evidence, and values in pedagogical decision making.

One exceptional feature of the MAT is the early career induction support provided to graduates who teach in the greater Boston area. Social support, reflection on teaching challenges, and individual advising are offered in monthly meetings and in one-on-one conferences.

Learning Goals

The Education Studies major is designed for students who want to explore social and historical contexts of educational policy; teaching, learning and human development; and the role of education and schooling in the lives of individuals, their families and the larger society. Since education is a multi-disciplinary field, education studies draws on a variety of disciplinary perspectives.

Based in a liberal arts perspective, the Education Studies major encourages students to think critically and creatively about such questions as: What is the relationship between education and schooling? How do various political, economic, historical, psychological, and social forces shape public education and public expectations for schools? What does schooling teach us about society? How do K-12 and higher education shape individual and communal identities and life opportunities? How can we better understand and guide learning in and out of school? What kinds of learning, schools, and teachers do young people need and deserve?

The three required courses provide an introduction to core concepts, theories and methodologies. The first, "Education and Social Policy," examines the various functions that schools perform, with special attention to the role of public schools in a democracy. Students explore how race/ethnicity, social class, gender and disability affect educational expectations and resource allocation. They also get introduced to core issues/dimensions in educational research.

Students select a second core course based in a foundational discipline (e.g. history, sociology, philosophy, economics) to continue their study of educational issues and problems. These courses include: AMST 150a (History of Childhood and Youth in America), AMST 180b (Topics in the History of American Education), COML 165a (Reading, Writing, and Teaching across Cultures), ECON 59b (The Economics of Education), ED 158b (Looking with the Learner: Practice and Inquiry), ED 159b (Philosophy of Education), or SOC 104a (The Sociology of Education).

In the capstone Senior Seminar, "Reading (and Talking Back to) Research on Education," students analyze quantitative and qualitative studies and conduct a small scale empirical research project on an educational problem or question that interests them. In addition to these three core courses, students select six electives from a wide array of education related courses offered by different departments and programs around the university.

Critical Understandings: Students completing the Education Studies major will be able to:

  • Understand schools in various contexts (e.g. cultural, historical, economic, and political), and be able to articulate the ethical and civic dimensions of schooling;
  • Think critically about educational opportunity, equity, and achievement in relation to race/ethnicity, social class, gender, and disability;
  • Analyze teaching and learning, education and schooling, and student growth and development through various disciplinary lenses;
  • Use educational research skills to investigate educational issues and challenges.

Core Skills: The Education Studies major emphasizes core skills in analysis, critical thinking, research, and communication. Based on the critical understandings above, Education Studies majors will be prepared to:

  • Think critically and write persuasively about the various functions schools perform in a community, with special attention to issues of equality and access in our democracy;
  • Use research skills to assess the validity, paradigmatic claims and limits of empirical studies in education;
  • Critically evaluate educational research, policy and practice, and develop policy recommendations.

Social Justice: As a liberal arts university with a strong commitment to social justice, Brandeis has a responsibility to contribute to the improvement of education as a key building block of democracy. The Education Studies major examines the various functions schools perform in society, with special attention to the role of public schools in a democracy and the intended and unintended consequences of educational policies and practices on student access and achievement. The Education Studies major enables graduates to acquire and develop the knowledge, skills, and perspectives to examine and act on the ethical and civic dimensions of schooling.

Upon Graduation: After graduation, a Brandeis Education Studies major will be well prepared to be a citizen in our democracy. S/he will also be prepared to pursue:

  • Education policy, legislative, or non-profit work;
  • Careers in education-related fields such as school psychology, higher education,informal education, museum education;
  • Graduate study in preparation for teaching or a scholarly career in education.

Please note: Education Studies is not a route towards teacher licensure.

The Teacher Education minor is designed for students who want to become pre-school, elementary, middle, or high school teachers. It includes the study of learners and learning, school and society, and general and subject-specific pedagogy. Teachers need deep and flexible subject matter knowledge; thus, students who minor in Teacher Education choose a compatible liberal arts major. Coursework on campus is integrated with field experiences in area schools which culminate in a semester of supervised student teaching.

For information about the teacher education course requirements, go to http://www.brandeis.edu/programs/education/ugrad/teachered/requirements.html. Education Program advisors encourage interested students to meet with them early to discuss the teacher education programs, course requirements, and opportunities.

Four central themes define the Brandeis Teacher Education Program and shape our learning goals:

Knowing students as learners
Teacher Education students understand their pupils as individuals and members of communities and know how to shape instruction that builds on their interests, strengths, and needs as thinkers and doers.

Teaching for understanding
Teacher Education students learn how to make academic content a resource for inquiry and a means of giving pupils wider access to the world. They explore ways to teach to ambitious standards for all children, and learn principles and practices of assessment aligned with those standards and purposes.

Inquiry
Teacher Education students learn to promote curiosity, and they make inquiry a central part of their professional practice as teachers.

Social Justice
Teacher Education students create classrooms in which pupils practice respect, fairness and decency and learn to contribute to the development of a just society.

Critical Understandings: Students who complete the teacher education minor will understand:

  • the diverse ways that children explore, learn, and develop their interests inside and outside of the classroom;
  • the importance of knowing the subject/s they teach in coherent and flexible ways;
  • the relationship between race, class, and gender and educational opportunity; and
  • the urgency of helping their pupils learn literacy and numeracy skills, effective communication, critical thinking, and working well with others in our democracy and inter-dependent world.

Core Skills: Student teachers who successfully complete the minor will be able to:

  • prepare curriculum and adapt curricular materials to engage and challenge the diverse learners they teach;
  • plan and employ a repertoire of instructional strategies and assessments so as to motivate and involve students in worthwhile learning;
  • create and maintain a safe and respectful learning community in the classroom;
  • promote equity in the classroom and school;
  • work productively with families and colleagues; and
  • reflect on their teaching and learn from experience.

These skills are aligned with the Massachusetts Professional Standards for Teachers (603 CMR 7.08) and are assessed using the Massachusetts Pre-service Performance Assessment (PPA). Students also video-tape and reflect on their practice, and develop an e-portfolio which contains a statement about their teaching stance, unit plan/s, and students’ work. Students must pass the relevant Massachusetts Teacher Educator License (MTEL) tests in order to qualify for the MA Initial teaching license.

Upon Graduation: Successful completion of the elementary or secondary minor, together with a passing grade on the MA Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL), leads to an initial license to teach in Massachusetts, which has reciprocal licensing arrangements with the other states and the District of Columbia. Successful completion of the preschool minor fulfills the Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care requirements for lead teachers in infant-toddler programs and/or preschool.

Becoming an accomplished teacher happens over time. In fact, good teachers never stop learning. Our program provides a strong foundation for beginning teaching along with the tools and dispositions needed to continue learning in and from teaching.

How to Be Admitted to the Graduate Program

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, given in an earlier section of this Bulletin, apply to candidates for admission to this program. Candidates for admission to the MAT program apply to either the elementary or the secondary MAT; in the application materials, they specify the concentrations of interest: public education (elementary) or Jewish day schools; or secondary biology, chemistry, Chinese, English, history, mathematics, physics, or Bible/Tanakh.

Strong liberal arts preparation with depth in an appropriate discipline and/or a record of professional accomplishment in an appropriate field is expected. Applicants to the Elementary MAT should be able to demonstrate possession of the knowledge necessary to teach the four subjects constituting the core of the elementary school curriculum: mathematics, literacy/English language arts, science, and the social studies. Applicants to the Secondary MAT must have an undergraduate major or other very strong academic background in the content area they wish to teach. Program faculty are available for consultation and transcript review prior to application with respect to this or other admissions criteria. Prospective applicants are urged to request transcript review, preferably in the summer or fall term prior to the desired term of entry.

Prior experience with children is strongly advised. Applications should include three letters of reference, the results of the GRE general exam, a transcript, a resume, and a statement of purpose explaining their reasons for pursuing this degree.

Further information about application processes and criteria, scholarship opportunities, and program requirements is available on the MAT website.

Faculty

Marya Levenson, Director
Teacher education. Education policy. Education studies.

Marcie Abramson
Mathematics.

Jennifer Cleary (on leave spring 2015)
Theater Education.

Helen Featherstone
Educational research. Elementary and mathematics teacher education

Sharon Feiman-Nemser (on leave academic year 2014-2015)
Elementary education. Jewish education. Teacher education.

Tom Heyman
Elementary science.

Jon Levisohn
Philosophy of education. Jewish education.

Susan Mayer
Teacher research.

Alexa Miller
Arts and Education.

Deborah Moriarty
Reading and literacy.

Joseph Reimer (on leave spring 2015)
Education policy. Informal education.

Faye Ruopp
Mathematics.

Rachel Kramer Theodorou
Elementary education. Literacy education.

Affiliated Faculty (contributing to the curriculum, advising and administration of the department or program)
Joyce Antler (American Studies)
Michael Coiner (Economics)
Jon Levisohn (Near Eastern and Judaic Studies)
James Morris (Biology)
Malcolm Watson (Psychology)

Requirements for the Minors

Education Programs Leading to Licensure

Secondary
PSYC 36b (note that PSYC 1a is a prerequisite for PSYC 36b), ED 100b, and ED 102a are prerequisites for practice teaching. ED 104a, 268a, 269a or 270a and ED 110e are taken in the senior year. Students must consult the director of the program for other requirements, including recommended courses in their major. It is recommended that students take ED 100b in their sophomore year and ED 102a in their junior year. Students must pass the MTEL Communication and Literacy Skills Test before enrolling in ED 110e (student teaching). 

Elementary
PSYC 33a (note that PSYC 1a is a prerequisite for PSYC 33a); ED 100a followed by ED 107a (sophomores who have taken ED 100a are advised to take ED 107a as juniors); ED 101a and b and ED 105a, always taken in the semester before student teaching; and ED 111e (student teaching); MATH 3a, unless waived upon education program and math department review. Students must consult the education program faculty advisor for elementary candidates regarding these and other program requirements. It is strongly recommended that, whenever possible, students consult the advisor during their first year. The education program Web site lists significant additional liberal arts courses required for licensure by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Students must pass specified portions of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL) before enrolling in ED 111e (student teaching).

Preschool
Practice teaching at the Lemberg Children's Center is possible (ED 112e). Prerequisites are PSYC 33a, ED 100a and ED 107a. These courses, plus one other, will fulfill the Department of Early Education and Care requirements for lead teachers in infant/toddler and/or preschool. For further information, consult the director of the Lemberg Children's Center.


Education Studies

A. Core course: ED 155b (Education and Social Policy).

B. A second core course to be selected from the following electives:

AMST 150a (History of Childhood and Youth in America)
COML 165a (Reading, Writing, and Teaching across Cultures)
ECON 59b (Economics of Education)
ED 158b (Looking with the Learner: Practice and Inquiry)
ED 159b (Philosophy of Education)
SOC 104a (The Sociology of Education)

C. At least four additional program electives, no more than two of which can be taken in the same department or interdepartmental program. Program electives are listed at the end of the education course listings.

Students may substitute successful completion of an essay, thesis, or internship, as described below, for the fourth elective course option:

  1. Essay: an approved research or honors essay, usually taken in the senior year. Students would receive credit for this essay through their department major, or ED 98a (Individual Readings and Research in Education), or an independent study or research course approved by the director of the education program.
  2. Honors Thesis: a senior thesis in the student's major that has an emphasis on some aspect of education.
  3. Internship: an internship (ED 92) approved by the director of the education program. (Students who are student teaching in the education program will also be eligible to receive internship credit if they are concurrently pursuing an education studies minor.) Students who choose this option will keep a journal about their experiences and produce a final paper.

D. Students must achieve a grade of C- or higher in each course taken for credit in the minor. Pass/Fail courses will not earn credit toward the minor.

E. Students may have only two cross-over courses that meet requirements for both the education (licensure) minor and the education studies minor.

Requirements for the Major

Education Studies Major

A.  ED 155b (Education and Social Policy)

B.  A second core course in which to study education from the perspective of a foundational discipline.  Students may choose their second core course from one of the following courses:

AMST 150a (History of Childhood and Youth in America)
COML 165a (Reading, Writing, and Teaching across Cultures)
ECON 59b (Economics of Education)
ED 158b (Looking with the Learner: Practice and Inquiry)
ED 159b (Philosophy of Education)
SOC 104a (The Sociology of Education)

C. At least six other program electives, no more than two of which can be used to meet the requirements of both the teacher education (licensure) minor and the education studies major.  As part of fulfilling the elective requirements, students must take three courses in either group 1 (Schooling, Policy, and Society) and one course in group 2 (Human Development, Learning, and/or Teaching), or vice versa (three courses in group 2 and one course in group 1).  We urge majors to choose for one of their electives a course that focuses on cross-cultural understanding, such as COML 165a, ED 158b, or see the listing of groups of electives listed below.

Please note that majors who intend to do an honors thesis involving empirical research are required to have completed a research course before their senior year.

Students may substitute successful completion of an essay or internship, as described below, for one of the six elective courses.

Essay: An approved research or honors essay, usually taken in the senior year. Students would receive credit for this essay, or ED 98a (Individual Readings and Research in Education), or an independent study or research course approved by the director of the education program.

Internship: An internship (ED 92) approved by the director of the education program. (Students who are student teaching in the education program will also be eligible to receive internship credit if they are concurrently pursuing an education studies major.) Students who choose this option will keep a journal about their experiences and produce a final paper.

D. ED 165a ( Reading (and Talking Back to) Research on Education) All education studies majors are required to enroll in this seminar during the fall semester of their senior year. 

E. Honors: Students who wish to be considered for honors in education studies will be required to complete a senior thesis. Students who intend to do an honors thesis must discuss their potential thesis topic with a faculty adviser in education studies during their junior year.  These students will have an opportunity to begin their research in ED 165a and will then enroll in ED 99b to complete their thesis. 

F. Pass/Fail courses will not earn credit toward the major.  Students must receive a grade of C- or higher for any course to be counted as part of the education studies major.

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts in Teaching

The MAT is a full-time, in-residence, year-long, forty-eight-credit program running summer-fall-spring-summer consecutive terms.

Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts in Teaching – Elementary Education are admitted to one of two concentrations: public education or Jewish day schools (DeLeT).

Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts in Teaching – Middle or Secondary Education are admitted to one of the following concentrations: biology, chemistry, Chinese, English, history, mathematics, physics, or Bible/Tanakh.

Program of Study
Within a coherent, sequenced course of study, students examine theories and cases of human learning, study principles and practices of teaching specific subjects, and engage in some of the big questions and debates that characterize the field. Guided teaching practice begins in the summer and continues through a year-long internship in a nearby classroom. Working closely with an experienced mentor teacher, students gradually assume increasing instructional responsibility and begin functioning as junior colleagues in the school community. Over the course of the year, students learn principles and practices of inquiry-oriented pedagogy in the subject area(s). They study formal and informal methods of assessment, learn how to interpret and adapt curricular standards, and practice engaging families in meaningful conversation about children's educational accomplishments and needs.

Additional information about required courses, calendar, and other information about the program and the specific concentrations may be found on the MAT website, www.brandeis.edu/programs/education/MAT. Consult the department coordinator for section assignments.

Internship
Intensive internships are an integral part of the MAT program. Duration ranges from two to five days a week; students are responsible for their own transportation. The program arranges placements in public or Jewish day schools, in districts such as Belmont, Boston, Framingham, Newton, and Waltham. The field experience is supported by regular mentoring from school personnel, observations and advisement by an assigned field instructor, and a weekly reflective teaching seminar that examines such topics as building and maintaining classroom culture, instructional planning, curriculum development, assessment, and emergent problems of practice.

Teacher Research
As a culminating project, students design, conduct, and report on a classroom-based inquiry project, often a form of "action research." Successful completion of the project is a requirement for the degree. In the second summer semester, students present their findings to faculty, friends, and colleagues.

Induction Year
MAT graduates whose initial teaching positions are in the greater Boston area are provided ongoing professional development in their first year. Social support, reflection on teaching challenges, and individual advising are offered in regular meetings and in one-on-one conferences.

Courses of Instruction

(1-99) Primarily for Undergraduate Students

ED 92a Education Internship and Analysis
Usually offered every year.
Staff

ED 98a Individual Readings and Research in Education
Usually offered every year.
Staff

ED 98b Individual Readings and Research in Education
Usually offered every year.
Staff

ED 99a Senior Thesis
Seniors who are candidates for degrees with honors in education studies must register for this course in their final semester and, under the direction of a faculty member, prepare an honors thesis on a suitable topic. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

ED 99b Senior Thesis
Prerequisite: ED 165a.
Seniors who are candidates for degrees with honors in education studies must register for this course in their final semester and, under the direction of a faculty member, prepare an honors thesis on a suitable topic. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

(100-199) For Both Undergraduate and Graduate Students

ED 100a Exploring Teaching (Elementary and Preschool)
[ ss ]
Yields six semester-hour credits towards rate of work and graduation. Three hours per week of field experience (participant observation in an elementary or preschool classroom), arranged by the education program, are required in addition to regular class time. A $10. fee is payable at the start of the semester to offset transportation costs.
Examines the relationship of teaching and learning, the purposes of elementary schooling, and the knowledge requirements for elementary and preschool teaching. Through readings, analysis of videotapes, and guided observations, students investigate classroom culture, student thinking, and curriculum standards. Usually offered every fall semester.
Ms. Theodorou

ED 100b Exploring Teaching (Secondary)
[ ss wi ]
Yields six semester-hour credits towards rate of work and graduation. Not open to first-year students. Three hours per week of field experience (participant observation in a middle or high school classroom), arranged by the education program, are required in addition to regular class time. A $10. fee is payable at the start of the semester to offset transportation costs.
Examines the relationship of teaching and learning, the purposes of secondary schooling and the knowledge requirements for middle and high school teaching. Through readings, analysis of videotapes and guided observations, students investigate classroom culture, student thinking, and curriculum standards. Usually offered every spring semester.
Ms. Levenson

ED 101a Elementary School Curriculum and Teaching: Literacy, Social Studies, and Other Topics
[ ss ]
Yields six semester-hour credits towards rate of work and graduation. Limited to students enrolling in ED 111e spring semester. Weekly field experience, arranged by the education program, is required in addition to regular class time. Contact the program for further information.
Focuses on principles and effective procedures for teaching literature and social studies in elementary classrooms. Emphasizes the cognitive, social, and cultural dimensions of literacy learning as well as strategies for reading and writing nonfiction and critical approaches to the teaching of social studies. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Moriarty and Staff

ED 101b Elementary School Curriculum and Teaching: Science, Arts and Other Topics
[ ss ]
Limited to students enrolling in ED 111e spring semester.
Focuses on principles and effective procedures for teaching elementary students. Examines how art, creative drama, multicultural education, special education, and physical education affect teaching and learning. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Moriarty and Staff

ED 102a Secondary Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment
[ oc ss ]
Prerequisite: ED 100b. Yields six semester-hour credits towards rate of work and graduation. It is strongly recommended that juniors who are planning to student teach (ED 110e) in their senior year enroll in ED 102a in their junior year. ED 102a is a prerequisite for ED 110e. A $10 fee is payable at the start of the semester to offset transportation costs.
Principles of curriculum, instruction, and assessment in secondary schools. Two hours per week of participant observation in a middle or high school classroom are required. Usually offered every fall semester.
Staff

ED 104a Secondary School: Theory into Practice
[ ss ]
Limited to students enrolling in ED 110e spring semester.
Principles and methods of teaching in specific subject areas in middle and high schools. Usually offered every fall semester.
Staff

ED 105a Elementary School Curriculum and Teaching: Math, Multiculturalism and Other Topics
[ ss ]
Limited to students enrolling in ED 111e spring semester. Must be taken concurrently with ED 101a in the fall semester.
Principles and strategies of teaching mathematics and science in elementary classrooms. Emphasizes understanding mathematical and scientific concepts needed by elementary teachers, effective teaching procedures, and recommended materials. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Abramson and Mr. Heyman

ED 107a Teaching and Learning Reading in Elementary and Preschools
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: ED 100a. Yields six semester-hour credits towards rate of work and graduation. Summer session open only to MAT students. A $10. fee is payable at the start of the semester to offset transportation costs.
Examines theories and methods of teaching reading and language arts to children in elementary and pre-schools. Emphasizes competencies necessary for developmental reading. Explores strategies for literacy, including the interrelated aspects of writing and spelling. Requires a field experience of fifteen hours. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Moriarty

ED 110e Practice Teaching: Secondary School
[ ss ]
Prerequisites: ED 100b, ED 102a (must be taken the fall semester preceding ED 110e), and ED 104a (must be taken concurrently with ED 110e). Enrollment limited to students in the education program. Students must pass the Communication and Literacy Skills Test before enrolling in ED 110e.
Full-time student teaching under supervision of qualified teachers; regular conferences to discuss and evaluate the teaching experience. Includes at least one after-school meeting most weeks, covering such topics as multicultural education, special education, and reading. Usually offered every spring semester.
Ms. Kelly

ED 111e Practice Teaching: Elementary School
[ ss ]
Prerequisites: ED 100a, ED 101a, ED 101b, ED 105a, and ED 107a. Enrollment limited to students in the education program. Students must pass the MTEL Communication and Literacy Skills Test before enrolling in ED 111e.
Full-time student teaching under supervision of qualified teachers; regular conferences to discuss and evaluate the teaching experience. Includes at least one after-school seminar per week. Usually offered every spring semester.
Ms. Theodorou

ED 112e Practice Teaching: Preschool
[ ss ]
Prerequisites: PSYC 33a and ED 100a or ED 103a. Enrollment limited to students in the education program. Signature of the education program director required.
Teaching under supervision of qualified head teachers at the Lemberg Children's Center with toddlers, preschoolers, and kindergartners. Thirty-five hours per week includes thirty hours teaching, five hours planning and meeting time. Regular conferences to discuss and evaluate the teaching experience. Usually offered every year.
Staff

ED 155b Education and Social Policy
[ ss wi ]
Examines the various functions that schools perform in a community, with special attention to the intended and unintended consequences of contemporary policies such as special education, desegregation, charter schools, and the standards/accountability movement. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Levenson

ED 157b The Psychology of Student Learning
[ ss ]
Open only to MAT students.
How do children learn? Topics in this survey course include models of learning, cognitive and social development, creativity, intelligence, character education, motivation, complex reasoning, and learning disabilities. Course methods include contemporary research analyses, case studies, group projects, short lectures, and class discussions.
Mr. Reimer

ED 158b Looking with the Learner: Practice and Inquiry
Does not satisfy a school distribution requirement--for education studies core course credit only. Lab fee: $40.
Links theory to practice in learning through the visual arts through three types of experiences: 1) looking at art; 2) museum-based interactions with students from Stanley Elementary School in Waltham; and 3) documenting our experiences as lookers, learners, and teachers. What can we learn about art, artists, ourselves, and young learners through the processes of looking at art? How can we best support students in their own encounters with art and learning? How can museums serve as a model for education in various settings? Usually offered every year.
Ms. Bernson

ED 159b Philosophy of Education
[ ss ]
Explores several major issues in philosophy of education through close examination and discussion of recent theoretical texts. Issues include the goals of education; the rights of the state to foster civic virtue; multiculturalism; moral education; the problem of indoctrination; education for autonomy, rationality, critical thinking, and open-mindedness. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Levisohn

ED 163b Creativity and Caring
[ ss ]
Explores "creativity" and "caring," significant human capacities, and their relationship. Drawing on developmental and social psychology, we ask: How do they develop? What affects our being creative and caring? How can educators promote these? Usually offered every year.
Mr. Reimer

ED 165a Reading (and Talking Back to) Research on Education
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: ED 155b. Open to education studies majors only.
In this required capstone course for education studies majors, students will review quantitative and qualitative research through disciplinary lenses. Students pursue some topic of inquiry by either reviewing and synthesizing educational research, or conducting some empirical research. Usually offered every year.
Staff

ED 170a Critical Perspectives in Urban Education
[ ss wi ]
Examines the nature of urban schools, their links to the social and political context, and the perspectives of the people who inhabit them. Explores the historical development of urban schools; the social, economic, and personal hardships facing urban students; and challenges of urban school reform. Usually offered every year.
Staff

ED 175a The Teaching of English Language Learners: Pre-K to 12
[ ss ]
Corequisite: Students are required to do an Experiential Learning component for this class.
Examines the intersection of culture and language, including issues such as testing, family involvement, and different challenges facing English Language Learners. While this course will be of interest to anyone working with English learners, teachers are now required to be teachers of English in addition to content teachers. (Upon completion, participants will have acquired the skills and knowledge base for Category 1 and 2 as defined in the MA requirements for teachers.) Usually offered every year.
Ms. Theodorou

(200 and above) Primarily for Graduate Students

ED 221b Readings in Education
Staff

ED 251 Leadership, Authority, and School Change
Yields three semester-hour credits.
Focuses on a developmental model of teacher development, instructional and institutional leadership in schools, modeling and building of professional learning communities, and reflections on the challenges and opportunities of teacher leadership. Offered as part of Brandeis Hebrew Charter School Institute.
Ms. Levenson

ED 253 Improving Teaching and Learning in the Classroom Setting
Yields three semester-hour credits.
Focuses on the theory and practice of becoming a teacher leader. Participants will experience and then lead core practices which can support their work with individual teachers and with groups. Offered as part of Hebrew Charter School Institute.
Ms. Raider-Roth

ED 259 Leadership in Curriculum and Assessment
Yields three semester-hour credits.
Provides in-service teachers with necessary professional support and skill development to become teacher leaders within their respective schools. Offered as part of Hebrew Charter School Institute.
Ms. Goldstein Katz

ED 260a Special Education: Teaching for Inclusion
Open only to MAT students.
Examines specific learner characteristics of students with disabilities as well as modifications (program, instructional, environmental) and strategies that facilitate a more successful learning experience for these students. Usually offered every summer.
Ms. Elion

ED 261a Inquiry-Based Science Teaching and Learning
Open only to MAT students.
Focuses on the learning and exploration of scientific concepts and strategies needed to teach inquiry-based science in elementary classrooms. Usually offered every year.
Staff

ED 262a Teaching Mathematics in Elementary Classrooms
Open only to MAT students.
Focuses on the learning, discovery, and exploration of the skills and strategies needed to teach mathematical concepts and skills in elementary school classrooms. Usually offered every summer.
Ms. Ruopp

ED 263b Reflective Teaching
Open only to MAT students.
A weekly seminar closely coordinated with the Field Internship (ED 265b). Students explore and evaluate approaches to classroom organization and management, instructional planning, and assessment. They form habits of critical colleagueship and develop skills to study their teaching and their students' learning. Students also assemble a teaching portfolio that documents their learning in relation to program standards. Usually offered every spring.
Ms. Pearlmutter and Staff

ED 264a Foundations of Education
Open only to MAT students.
Explores philosophical, sociological, historical, and political contexts of schools in the United States, including legal issues and concerns, teaching concerns, and current issues and trends. Emphasizes curriculum theory and the link between the developing child and instruction. Usually offered every summer.
Ms. Levenson and Staff

ED 265a Field Internship
Open only to MAT students.
Supervised teaching internship designed to help connect theory and practice. Students gradually build proficiency in teaching, adding responsibilities and skills over time. Students have guided opportunities to observe, plan, and teach core subjects, to manage classrooms, to get to know students and families, and to participate fully in the life of the school. Interns receive regular mentoring from school and university personnel. Usually offered every fall.
Staff

ED 265b Field Internship
Open only to MAT students. Corequisite: ED 263b.
Supervised teaching internship designed to help connect theory and practice. Students gradually build proficiency in teaching, adding responsibilities and skills over time. Students have guided opportunities to observe, plan, and teach core subjects, to manage classrooms, to get to know students and families, and to participate fully in the life of the school. Interns receive regular mentoring from school and university personnel. Usually offered every spring.
Staff

ED 266a Teacher Research
Open only to MAT students.
Students design and carry out a systematic investigation addressing a question or problem arising in their practice. Students explore principles and methods of classroom-based research and review examples of published teacher research. Students present their inquiry projects to fellow students, mentor teachers, and faculty in a teacher research colloquium at the conclusion of their second summer session. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Feiman-Nemser or Ms. Mayer

ED 267a Fundamentals of Teaching
Open only to MAT students.
Central seminar taught in conjunction with the Field Internship (ED 265a). Explores and evaluates approaches to instructional planning, formative and summative assessment, classroom culture and management, and emergent issues. Also policy and regulatory issues at national, state, district, and building level as they impinge on daily practice. Reflective practice, inquiry, and critical colleagueship are themes. Portfolio requirement.
Ms. Featherstone, Ms. Pearlmutter, and Staff

ED 267b Fundamentals of Teaching
Open only to MAT students.
A continuation of ED 267a, the central seminar taught in conjunction with the Field Internship (ED 265b).
Ms. Pearlmutter and Staff

ED 268a Pedagogy of English
Prerequisite: ED 264a. Corequisite: ED 267a. Open only to MAT students in the secondary English concentration and seniors student teaching in secondary school English.
This course prepares teachers of secondary English language arts to effectively plan for and assess student learning in three primary areas of instruction: writing, reading, and speaking. The following are emphasized: methods of engagement with literature, content-specific assessment and discussion techniques, writing process instruction, reading strategy and vocabulary instruction, and methods for reaching a diverse group of learners. An underlying goal of this course is for teachers to approach their chosen profession with a spirit of reflection, continuous improvement, and collaboration. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Blais

ED 269a Pedagogy of History
Prerequisite: ED 264a. Corequisite: ED 267a. Open only to MAT students in the secondary history concentration and seniors student teaching in secondary school history.
This course supports the aspiring secondary school history teacher as he or she prepares for the student teaching experience. Emphasis is placed on building a content-specific personal resource library, planning for cohesive lessons and units, teaching a variety of history content to students of diverse personal backgrounds and academic abilities, and developing collegial relationships in the teaching profession. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Dunne

ED 270a Pedagogy of Science
Prerequisite: ED 264a. Corequisite: ED 267a. Open only to MAT students in the secondary sciences concentrations and seniors student teaching in secondary school sciences.
Provides students with an overview of trends, issues, strategies, and resources specific to the teaching of secondary school science. Focuses on the following key concepts as they relate to teaching secondary science: inquiry, teaching for understanding, knowing students as learners, strategies and resources to support science teaching, successful laboratory activities, professionalism, and social justice. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Quinlan

ED 271a The Pedagogy of Tanakh
Prerequisite: ED 264a. Corequisite: ED 267a. Open only to MAT students in the secondary Bible concentration.
This course is designed to provide opportunities to develop the intellectual and pedagogical skills needed for teaching Tanakh. Usually offered every year.
Staff

ED 272a Pedagogy of Mathematics
Prerequisite: ED 264a.
Prepares teachers of secondary mathematics to plan for and assess student learning in the middle and high school math curriculum. This course focuses on methods of instruction; effective use of materials, including technology; preparation of coherent lessons and units; understanding the diversity of learners; the place of reflection and collaboration in teaching. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Wiczer

ED 298a Independent Study
Staff

Education Program Electives: Schooling, Policy, and Society

AMST 150a The History of Childhood and Youth in America
[ ss ]
Examines cultural ideas and policies about childhood and youth, as well as child-rearing and parenting strategies, child-saving, socialization, delinquency, children's literature, television, and other media for children and youth. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Antler

AMST 180b Topics in the History of American Education
[ ss ]
Examines major themes in the history of American education, including changing ideas about children, childrearing, and adolescence; development of schools; the politics of education; education and individual life history. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Antler

ANTH 61b Language in American Life
[ ss ]
Examines the relations between language and some major dimensions of American social life: social groupings (the structures of ethnic, regional, class, and gender relations); social settings (such as courtrooms, workplaces, and homes); and social interaction. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. McIntosh

ANTH 109a Children, Parenting, and Education in Cross-Cultural Perspective
[ ss ]
Examines childcare techniques, beliefs about childhood and adolescence, and the objectives of school systems in different areas of the world, in order to illuminate cross-cultural similarities and differences in conceptions of personhood, identity, gender, class, race, nation, and the relationship between the individual and society. Usually offered every third year.
Staff

ANTH 180b Playing Human: Persons, Objects, Imagination
[ ss ]
Examines how people interact with material artifacts that are decidedly not human and yet which, paradoxically, deepen and extend experiences of being human. Theories of fetishism; masking and ritual objects across cultures; play and childhood experience; and objects of imagination, memory and trauma. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Roosevelt and Ms. Schattschneider

COML 165a Reading, Writing, and Teaching across Cultures
[ hum nw wi ]
Examines contemporary literary representations of literacy, schooling, and language from a cross-cultural perspective. Students also analyze their own educational trajectories and experiences with writing and reading. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Hale

COML 166b Literacy, Language and Culture
[ hum nw ]
Examines contemporary cross-cultural literary representations of the relationships among languages and cultures. We will read texts such as Hoffman's Lost in Translation, Dangarembga's Nervous Conditions, and Ngugi's Decolonising the Mind as well as poetry and essays from Haiti, French Guyana, the Navajo Nation and a variety of immigrant communities in the US. Questions we will consider include: Does language carry culture? When is language an instrument of power? What's the difference between learning to speak and/or write a particular language? What happens when children must learn a new language when they enter school? Students will share their own richly diverse linguistic experiences. Usually offered every year.
Staff

COML/ENG 140b Children's Literature and Constructions of Childhood
[ hum ]
Explores whether children's literature has sought to civilize or to subvert, to moralize or to enchant, forming a bedrock for adult sensibility. Childhood reading reflects the unresolved complexity of the experience of childhood itself as well as larger cultural shifts around the globe in values and beliefs. Usually offered every third year.
Ms. Miller

ECON 59b The Economics of Education
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: ECON 2a or 10a.
An introduction to economic analysis of the education sector. Topics include the concept of human capital, private and social return on investment in education, cost-benefit analysis of special educational programs, and issues in the financing of education. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Coiner

ED 159b Philosophy of Education
[ ss ]
Explores several major issues in philosophy of education through close examination and discussion of recent theoretical texts. Issues include the goals of education; the rights of the state to foster civic virtue; multiculturalism; moral education; the problem of indoctrination; education for autonomy, rationality, critical thinking, and open-mindedness. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Levisohn

ED 170a Critical Perspectives in Urban Education
[ ss wi ]
Examines the nature of urban schools, their links to the social and political context, and the perspectives of the people who inhabit them. Explores the historical development of urban schools; the social, economic, and personal hardships facing urban students; and challenges of urban school reform. Usually offered every year.
Staff

HIST 50b American Transformations: Perspectives on United States History, Origins to the Present
[ ss ]
Investigates U.S. history in a wider world, from its origins to the present, starting with the premise that American History itself is a construct of modern empire. Only by investigating the roots of power and resistance can we understand the forces that deeply influence our world as we live it today. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Cooper

HIST 65b College 101: American Higher Education in Historical Perspective
[ ss wi ]
Studies one of the most important institutions in modern America: the university. Students examine the current organization and orientation of higher education in historical and sociological perspective, using nonfiction accounts, memoirs, and fiction about the college experience. Usually offered every fourth year.
Mr. Engerman

HSSP 192b Sociology of Disability
[ ss ]
In the latter half of the twentieth century, disability has emerged as an important social-political-economic-medical issue, with its own distinct history, characterized as a shift from "good will to civil rights." Traces that history and the way people with disabilities are seen and unseen, and see themselves. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Gulley

NEJS 170b Jewish Education in Modern America
[ hum ]
Draws on history, philosophy, and education to explore how Jewish education has changed from the late 19th century to the present, where and why it has succeeded and failed, what kind of Jewish education is needed now and in the future. Usually offered every other year.
Ms. Feiman-Nemser

NEJS 235b Philosophy of Jewish Education
What should Jewish education be? What are its legitimate goals? What are the competing visions of an educated Jew, and how do these influence educational practice? How is Jewish education similar to and different from other kinds of religious education? Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Levisohn

SOC 104a Sociology of Education
[ ss ]
Examines the role of education in society, including pedagogy, school systems, teacher organizations, parental involvement, community contexts, as well as issues of class, race, and gender. Usually offered every year.
Staff

SOC 104aj Sociology of Education
[ ss ]
Examines the role of education in society, including pedagogy, school systems, teacher organizations, parental involvement, community contexts, as well as issues of class, race, and gender. Offered as part of the JBS program.
Staff

SOC 108bj Immigration, Youth and Education
[ ss ]
Through sociological literature, videos, speakers, and site visits, we explore the relationship between immigrants and education and learn how education impacts first- and second-generation immigrants' long-term welfare in the United States. Field research is an important aspect of this class. Offered as part of JBS program.
Ms. Lucken

SOC 154a Community Structure and Youth Subcultures
[ ss ]
Examines how the patterning of relations within communities generates predictable outcomes at the individual and small-group level. Deals with cities, suburbs, and small rural communities. Special focus is given to youth subcultures typically found in each community type. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Cunningham

Education Program Electives: Human Development, Learning, and/or Teaching

ED 100a Exploring Teaching (Elementary and Preschool)
[ ss ]
Yields six semester-hour credits towards rate of work and graduation. Three hours per week of field experience (participant observation in an elementary or preschool classroom), arranged by the education program, are required in addition to regular class time. A $10. fee is payable at the start of the semester to offset transportation costs.
Examines the relationship of teaching and learning, the purposes of elementary schooling, and the knowledge requirements for elementary and preschool teaching. Through readings, analysis of videotapes, and guided observations, students investigate classroom culture, student thinking, and curriculum standards. Usually offered every fall semester.
Ms. Theodorou

ED 100b Exploring Teaching (Secondary)
[ ss wi ]
Yields six semester-hour credits towards rate of work and graduation. Not open to first-year students. Three hours per week of field experience (participant observation in a middle or high school classroom), arranged by the education program, are required in addition to regular class time. A $10. fee is payable at the start of the semester to offset transportation costs.
Examines the relationship of teaching and learning, the purposes of secondary schooling and the knowledge requirements for middle and high school teaching. Through readings, analysis of videotapes and guided observations, students investigate classroom culture, student thinking, and curriculum standards. Usually offered every spring semester.
Ms. Levenson

ED 107a Teaching and Learning Reading in Elementary and Preschools
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: ED 100a. Yields six semester-hour credits towards rate of work and graduation. Summer session open only to MAT students. A $10. fee is payable at the start of the semester to offset transportation costs.
Examines theories and methods of teaching reading and language arts to children in elementary and pre-schools. Emphasizes competencies necessary for developmental reading. Explores strategies for literacy, including the interrelated aspects of writing and spelling. Requires a field experience of fifteen hours. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Moriarty

ED 158b Looking with the Learner: Practice and Inquiry
Does not satisfy a school distribution requirement--for education studies core course credit only. Lab fee: $40.
Links theory to practice in learning through the visual arts through three types of experiences: 1) looking at art; 2) museum-based interactions with students from Stanley Elementary School in Waltham; and 3) documenting our experiences as lookers, learners, and teachers. What can we learn about art, artists, ourselves, and young learners through the processes of looking at art? How can we best support students in their own encounters with art and learning? How can museums serve as a model for education in various settings? Usually offered every year.
Ms. Bernson

ED 175a The Teaching of English Language Learners: Pre-K to 12
[ ss ]
Corequisite: Students are required to do an Experiential Learning component for this class.
Examines the intersection of culture and language, including issues such as testing, family involvement, and different challenges facing English Language Learners. While this course will be of interest to anyone working with English learners, teachers are now required to be teachers of English in addition to content teachers. (Upon completion, participants will have acquired the skills and knowledge base for Category 1 and 2 as defined in the MA requirements for teachers.) Usually offered every year.
Ms. Theodorou

HBRW 168a Hebrew Language Teaching I
[ fl hum ]
Prerequisite: Five semesters of Hebrew or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week.
An advanced-level methodology course that focuses on the theories and methodologies for teaching Hebrew. Course taught in Hebrew and in English. Designed primarily for students at the advanced level who are interested in eventually being able to teach Hebrew. Usually offered every fall.
Ms. Ringvald

LING 197a Language Acquisition and Development
[ oc ss ]
Prerequisite: LING 100a or permission of the instructor.
The central problem of language acquisition is to explain what makes this formidable task possible. Theories of language acquisition are studied, and conclusions are based on recent research in the development of syntax, semantics, and phonology. The overall goal is to arrive at a coherent picture of the language learning process. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Malamud

MATH 3a Explorations in Math: A Course for Educators
[ sn ]
An in-depth exploration of the fundamental ideas underlying the mathematics taught in elementary and middle school. Emphasis is on problem solving, experimenting with mathematical ideas, and articulating mathematical reasoning. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Torrey (Spring)

NEJS 169a Reading the Classroom as Text
[ hum ]
Yields six semester-hour credits towards rate of work and graduation. Prerequisite: Student must have a teaching position in an area religious school which serves as a "lab" and "experience" site.
In this experiential course, students analyze "records of practice" from their own and other's classrooms and situate their classroom experience in a broader conversation about the purposes, pedagogies and outcomes of religious education and the role of supplementary schools. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Feiman-Nemser

NEJS 170a Studying Sacred Texts
[ hum ]
What does it mean to study a sacred text? What are the problems with doing so? What is sacred about a sacred text? How is studying a sacred text similar to and different from studying other texts? How do different religious traditions study texts differently? Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Levisohn

NEJS 213b Teaching the Bible
Explores major issues concerning teaching biblical texts and "smaller" issues such as syllabus design and effective teaching and learning. Usually offered every third year.

PHYS 22a The Science in Science Teaching and Learning
[ sn ]
Does not meet requirements for the major in physics.
General science concepts and scientific inquiry will be studied in depth using direct instruction, student projects, and discovery learning. This laboratory-based course is especially relevant to future elementary school teachers. Usually offered every year.
Staff

PSYC 33a Developmental Psychology
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a).
An examination of normal child development from conception through adolescence. Course will focus on theoretical issues and processes of development with an emphasis on how biological and environmental influences interact. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Watson

PSYC 36b Adolescence and the Transition to Maturity
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a).
Examines the core issues (identity, intimacy, sexuality, spirituality, etc.) that define development during adolescence and the transition to young adulthood. Heavy emphasis is placed on integrating research and theory in understanding adolescence and young adulthood. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Wright

PSYC 131a Child Development across Cultures
[ ss wi ]
Prerequisite: PSYC 33a or 36b. Juniors and seniors have priority for enrollment.
In this seminar child development is compared across two cultures within the United States: the dominant European American culture and Navajo culture. The main objective of the course is to help students learn about the processes involved as culture influences development. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Watson

PSYC 169b Disorders of Childhood
[ ss ]
Prerequisites: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a), 33a, and permission of the instructor. Seniors and juniors have priority for admission.
Issues of theory, research, and practice in the areas of child and family psychopathology and treatment are reviewed in the context of normal developmental processes. Usually offered every semester.
Mr. Cunningham

THA 138b The Real American Idols: Education through Creativity and Theatrical Pedagogy
[ ca ]
Focuses on creativity in pedagogy from a theatrical lens and is meant for anyone who wishes to teach anyone just about anything! This course will focus on the building of community and confidence that takes place within a learning environment that utilizes creative and theatrical arts as a modality. We will discuss foundation and the theories behind education, learning, and expression through storytelling, theatre, and creative dramatics. This exploration will help students to ground their own work in what has and hasn't worked in the past, as well as to expand their own creative reach. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Cleary