Department of Psychology

Last updated: July 30, 2014 at 3:29 p.m.

Objectives

Undergraduate Major
The main objective of the psychology major is to help students develop a solid background in the scientific method and a strong foundation in the fundamentals of psychology, making them highly competitive candidates for postgraduate study and also preparing them to be thoughtful, analytic, and discerning problem solvers. Our pre-clinical psychology training provides all the necessary courses and credentials for admission to PhD programs in clinical psychology. The features of the undergraduate program also make Brandeis psychology graduates especially attractive to employers in the mental health and business professions. Given the broad training in quantitative and research skills, psychology students are sought after in a wide range of professional areas including marketing and consulting, government and public policy, and social and mental health services. Many of our graduates go on to graduate school in law, business, education, medicine, public health, speech pathology, and social work, as well as psychology. Recent psychology majors have gone on to graduate work in clinical, applied, and scientific research areas of the field. Our faculty conduct research in diverse areas that include cognitive neuroscience, normal and abnormal development, social interaction, spatial orientation, perception, memory, emotion, life-span development, and the effects of brain damage.

Graduate Programs in Psychology
The Department of Psychology offers a PhD and an MA program. There are two general areas of training within the PhD program: cognitive neuroscience and social developmental psychology. The goal of the PhD program is to develop excellent researchers and teachers who will become leaders in psychological science. From the start of graduate study, research activity is emphasized. The program helps students develop an area of research specialization and gives them opportunities to work in their chosen area of training: social developmental psychology or cognitive neuroscience. In both areas, dissertation supervisors are leaders in the field and pursue research in the following: motor control, visual perception, taste physiology and psychophysics, memory, learning, aging, child development, aggression, emotion, personality and cognition in adulthood and old age, social relations and health, stereotypes, and face perception.

Learning Goals

What are the biological mechanisms linking psychological stress to physical health? Does a jury’s verdict vary as a function of whether the defendant looks old or young for her age? When we concentrate harder to listen to someone in a noisy environment, is it then harder to remember what he has said? Do vulnerable children sometimes grow to become both bullies and victims? How can an astronaut’s adaptation to the weightlessness of space help older adults maintain their sense of balance and reduce the frequency of falls? Do we pay attention to different aspects of information that we encounter in the world as a function of our cultural background? Through coursework, research involvement, and applied experience, the Department of Psychology offers students the opportunity to explore questions like these. Students develop a strong scientific and research foundation for pursuing whatever aspects of experience and behavior pique their curiosity, and in the process they become thoughtful and discerning problem solvers. The program examines the most up-to-date psychological research and theory and also provides opportunities for direct involvement in clinical, mental-health, business, and educational applications of psychology.

The focus of the department is on basic scientific research and emphasizes a high level of undergraduate involvement. Our faculty conducts research in diverse areas including cognitive science, normal and abnormal development, social interaction, health and well-being, spatial orientation, sensation, perception, memory, emotion, life-span development and aging, and the effects of brain damage. Students can start to work on projects with psychology faculty as early as sophomore year and can obtain research and/or applied experience via: (1) informal volunteer work in a laboratory or professional setting; (2) registration in a formal course taught by a specific professor; or (3) an independent research project or honors thesis, some of which are funded by department grants. Psychology majors also study varied aspects of both basic and applied areas of the field. The two-semester clinical psychology practicum enables students to obtain supervised experience in actively helping roles as volunteers and assistants in social service, educational, and mental-health programs.

Knowledge Goals

  • Acquire a broad overview of the philosophical origins and historical development of psychology as a science.
  • Understand the basic concepts that characterize psychology as a field of scientific inquiry and appreciate the various subfields of the discipline that range from personality to cognitive neuroscience.
  • Understand the overlap of psychological concepts and methods with diverse academic disciplines and professions spanning the reductionist continuum from the humanities to the physical sciences.
  • Become familiar with the range of methods used to investigate behavior and experience.
  • Develop an understanding and an appreciation of how learning and biology jointly shape behavior and experience.
  • Understand the neural, developmental, social, and environmental bases of diversity among individuals.
  • Develop competence in reading and evaluating original scientific papers.
  • Become familiar with the basic concepts of statistics and develop skills for evaluating information from a statistical perspective and for using various statistical computer programs (e.g., SPSS, SAS, Excel) to analyze data.
  • Apply behavioral/psychological mechanisms and principles to the understanding of everyday problems.
  • Develop an awareness of the parameters, principles, and importance of ethical conduct in researching behavior and in applying our understanding to everyday problems.

Core Skill Goals

  • Objectively observe and think critically about the world, including the behavior of self and others, the ethical conduct of scientific research, and the application of our understanding to everyday experience.
  • Read and write about research articles accurately, abstract their essential ideas, and understand their implications and limitations.
  • Acquire competence in interpreting graphical data to understand what is being compared/manipulated (independent variables) and what is being measured (dependent variables).
  • Develop skills to critically evaluate the presentation of scientific ideas and research in the professional literature and in the popular media.
  • Design and conduct empirical research, including critical analysis of relevant literature, formulation of a testable hypothesis, design of valid and reliable data collection methods, application of appropriate statistical analysis and interpretation of findings, and the written and oral communication of findings.
  • Generate applications of theory and empirical research to personal experience and community problem-solving.
  • Achieve decision-making competence by applying the methods and quantitative reasoning of psychology to critical life choices.
  • Through participation in collaborative research projects, acquire effective skills of working with others in joint ventures.

Social Justice/ Graduation Goals

  • Translate learning about theoretical, empirical, and applied findings into an appreciation of the everyday experience of self and others.
  • Become familiar with the basic measurement and statistical tools that are essential for applying research to everyday life and for optimizing positive outcomes for both society and the individual.
  • Understand and abide by the ethics of psychology, including the recognition of and respect for socio-cultural complexity and international diversity.
  • Develop realistic ideas about how to pursue careers in psychology and related fields like law, medicine, and business.

How to Become a Major

Students can declare their major at any time, but most do so in their sophomore year. Special programs are held by the department and UDRs each fall to provide information for potential majors. Students ready to declare should review the Requirements for the Undergraduate Major and consult with the Psychology Undergraduate Advising Head. Each declared psychology major is assigned a faculty adviser from whom detailed advice about courses or career plans can be obtained.

Students are encouraged to start the major by taking PSYC 10a (Introduction to Psychology), no later than the sophomore year, because this is a prerequisite for most other courses. We strongly encourage majors to take PSYC 51a (Statistics) and PSYC 52a (Research Methods and Laboratory in Psychology) in their sophomore year and no later than their junior year, because many of the advanced seminars require these two courses as prerequisites. Both of these courses require advance registration with the department approximately two weeks prior to the university’s early registration period. The advance registration period and procedure are announced to majors and in Psychology classes.

A seniors honors thesis (PSYC 99d) or another independent research course (e.g., PSYC 93a) is strongly recommended for those interested in pursuing graduate training in clinical psychology. We encourage students who wish to do senior honors research to get involved in a faculty laboratory as early as possible. More information about the honors program is available on the psychology department’s website.

How to Be Admitted to the Graduate Program

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, as specified in an earlier section of this Bulletin, apply to candidates for admission to this area of study.

An undergraduate major in psychology is not required. Students with inadequate preparation may make up their deficiencies during their first year but without residence credit. Students are admitted on a competitive basis, which includes evaluation of previous academic records, recommendations, previous research experience, and results of the Graduate Record Examination (general test required, psychology test recommended). Applicants are encouraged to make contact with faculty members of interest before applying to the program.

The Department of Psychology's doctoral program leads to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. There are two general areas of training within the Ph.D. program: 1) cognitive neuroscience 2) social developmental psychology. Students in both areas have the option of choosing the Brain, Body and Behavior curriculum to gain a deep biomedical perspective on their chosen area.

Faculty

Joseph Cunningham, Undergraduate Advising Head
Emotional development and nonverbal communication. Clinical psychology.

Paul DiZio
Human spatial orientation and motor control.

Angela Gutchess
Aging. Culture. Memory.

Jennifer Gutsell
Social and affective neuroscience.

Donald Katz
Neural dynamics of gustatory perception and learning.

Raymond Knight (on leave fall 2014)
Clinical psychology. Experimental and developmental psychopathology.

Margie Lachman
Life-span development and aging. Adult personality and cognition.

James Lackner
Spatial orientation. Human movement control. Adaptation to unusual force environments.

Xiaodong Liu
Multivariate statistics. Educational evaluation and measurement.

Andrew Molinsky
Organizational behavior.

Nicolas Rohleder
Psychosocial factors affecting health. Stress and aging.

Robert Sekuler
Visual perception. Cognitive processes.

Malcolm Watson (on leave academic year 2014-2015)
Developmental psychology. Aggression.

Arthur Wingfield (on leave academic year 2014-2015)
Human memory.

Jutta Wolf
Health psychology. Psychoneuroimmunology.

Leslie Zebrowitz 
Social psychology. Person perception.

Affiliated Faculty (contributing to the curriculum, advising and administration of the department or program)
Richard Alterman (Computer Science)
Susan Birren (Biology)
Jerry Samet (Philosophy)

Requirements for the Undergraduate Major

A. PSYC 10a (Introduction to Psychology).

B. Four content courses: two from Group I and two from Group II:

Group I:  Perception, Cognition and Neuroscience
NPSY 11b (Behavioral Neuroscience), NPSY 12a (Perception), PSYC 14a (Comparative Psychology), PSYC 15a (Biological Bases of Motivation), NPSY 16a (Motor Control, formerly NPSY 127a), NPSY 17a (Hand and Brain), PSYC 21a (Learning and Behavior), NPSY 22b (Cognitive Neuroscience), NBIO 45a (The Cognitive adn Neurobiological Basis of Memory), NBIO 140a (Principles of Neuroscience), or NPSY 199a (Human Neuropsychology).

Group II: Social and Developmental
PSYC 31a (Personality), PSYC 32a (Abnormal Psychology), PSYC 33a (Developmental Psychology), PSYC 34b (Social Psychology), PSYC 36b (Adolescence and Transition to Maturity), PSYC 37a (Adult Development and Aging, formerly PSYC 101b), or PSYC 38a (Health Psychology).

C.  One Quantitative Course, PSYC 51a (Statistics). MATH 36b (Mathematical Statistics) or ECON 83a (Statistics for Economic Analysis) may be taken in place of PSYC 51a.

D. Two Research Science Courses. All students must take PSYC 52a (Research Methods and Laboratory in Psychology). The second course may be selected from any of the following advanced research courses in the Psychology department (cross-listed courses do not apply): PSYC 93a (Independent Research in Psychological Sciences), PSYC 99d (Senior Research in Psychology), or by double-counting one of the following research intensive advanced seminars toward both this Research Science Requirement (D) and the Advanced Seminar Requirement (E). Students may alternately apply a basic science course toward this requirement: CHEM 11a, 11b, CHEM 15a, 15b; PHYS 10a, 10b, 11a, 11b and 15a, 15b; BIOL 14a, 15b or 16a (the corresponding lab is not required for these chemistry, physics or biology courses). Advanced Seminars that are designated Research Intensive include: NPSY 120b, PSYC 130b, PSYC 131a, PSYC 133a, PSYC 135b, NPSY 141a, PSYC 142a, PSYC 146a, NPSY 154a, PSYC 155a, PSYC 160b, PSYC 169b, NPSY 174b.

E. Two Advanced Seminars from among: NPHY 115a, NPSY 120b, NPSY 125a, NPSY 128b, PSYC 130b, PSYC 131a, PSYC 133a, PSYC 135b, NPSY 137b, PSYC 140a, NPSY 141a, PSYC 142a, PSYC 146a, PSYC 150b, NPSY 154a, PSYC 155a, PSYC 160b, PSYC 161a and b (combined), PSYC 167b, PSYC 169b, PSYC 172a, NPSY 174b, PSYC 193b, PSYC 195a, NPSY 196b, NPSY 197a, or one approved cross-listed course. (Note: PSYC 161a and 161b, Clinical Psychology Practicum I and II, count only as one course in meeting this requirement)

F. Whatever the complement of courses used to satisfy the requirements, a student must complete at least 7 PSYC or NPSY courses. All courses that count toward the major must have a grade of C- or better. No course taken pass/fail may count toward the major requirements.

Special Note for Undergraduate Majors

A maximum of two AP exams with acceptable scores in the following subjects can be used toward the requirements for the psychology major: biology, chemistry, physics, and psychology. AP Statistics credit cannot be applied, though a student with a score of 5 may petition to take an advanced statistics course in lieu of PSYC 51a.

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts

The Department of Psychology offers a terminal master of arts degree program in general psychology. The MA program provides students with an understanding of the scientific foundations of psychology, as well as direct experience in research methods. The program provides excellent preparation for further training in clinical and in other areas of psychology to be pursued at other institutions. Students may enroll in the program on a full-time or part-time basis. Full-time students are expected to complete the degree in one year. The program may take an additional one or two semesters to complete as an Extended Master's student. Students desiring to continue their studies toward the PhD must apply for admission to that program. Please note that application to and acceptance into the MA program and application to and acceptance into the PhD program are separate and independent of each other.

Course Requirements
Successful completion of eight courses is required for the degree. Students are required to take two semesters of advanced psychological statistics (PSYC210a and PSYC210b), one semester of research methodology (PSYC211a), and the master's project readings course (PSYC 250b) that culminates in a master’s thesis involving an empirical research project or a comprehensive literature review with a research proposal. The master’s thesis must be deposited electronically to the Robert D. Farber University Archives at Brandeis.

To complete the eight course requirement, students choose four 100-level or higher electives from two groups: the cognitive neuroscience group (NPSY courses); and the social developmental group (PSYC courses). A minimum of one course per group must be taken. Students are also strongly encouraged to register for and attend PSYC 316a (Psychology Research Seminar) both semesters, or to engage in an equivalent activity in the area of cognitive neuroscience. See our website for a full list of Master's degree requirements.

Requirements for the Joint Degree of Master of Arts in Psychology & Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Interested students must first be admitted to the PhD program.

A. PSYC 210a and b (Advanced Psychological Statistics I and II).

B. PSYC 211a (Graduate Research Methods in Psychology).

C. PSYC 300a and 302a (Proseminar in Brain, Body and Behavior I and II).

D. Two courses numbered from PSYC 220-PSYC 240 series with successful completion of first-year research project, reported in APA manuscript format. This project must be on an issue relevant to women's, gender, and sexuality studies, will be read, and must be accepted by two faculty members from the psychology department, one of whom should be a member of the Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies core or affiliate faculty. If neither faculty member is associated with Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, then a third faculty member from the women's and gender studies program must be included on the review committee. This paper will serve as the master's research paper.

E. WMGS 208a, Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Research Seminar or an alternate.

F. One additional course from 100-level courses in psychology.

G. WMGS 205a or another designated graduate foundational course in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

H. Two elective courses in women's, gender, and sexuality studies.

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy

Program of Study
Although there is a three-year minimum residency requirement, four years of full-time graduate study are usually required for the PhD. Students may choose the doctoral program in Social Developmental Psychology or Cognitive Neuroscience. Students in both programs have the option of customizing their curriculum to meet the requirements of our Brain, Body, Behavior training track. Checklists of research, course and teaching requirements for each program can be found on the Department of Psychology website.

Research: Each student shall devote one-quarter of his/her time to research during the first term of the entering year. For all subsequent terms, students shall devote a minimum of one-half time to research.

Research Reports

Social Developmental Program in Psychology: Students will submit reports on their research for the first year, in journal form, by the beginning of the third term. The second project will be submitted by January 15 of the third year. Satisfactory completion of the research projects is required for continuation in the program. Students who have satisfactorily completed the research requirements will be permitted to continue their work toward the doctorate degree. Students will be required to submit a dissertation proposal with literature review by the end of their fourth year. An oral examination of the dissertation proposal will be scheduled within one month of submission of the written proposal. See our website for full details about the Social Developmental Program.

Cognitive Neuroscience Program in Psychology: First-year students will submit rotation reports on their research, in journal form, by the last scheduled day of class of each semester. The third report will be submitted by January 15 of the second year. Students who have satisfactorily completed the research requirements will be permitted to continue their work toward the doctorate degree. Students will be required to submit a dissertation proposal by the January 15th of their third year. An oral examination of the dissertation proposal will be scheduled within one month of submission of the written proposal. See our website for full details about the Cognitive Neuroscience program.

Brain, Body, and Behavior Training in Psychology: Students in both the Social Developmental and the Cognitive Neuroscience area have the option to follow this curriculum, which provides an emphasis on the interface of psychology and biomedical sciences. Each student will be required to follow the research reporting and other research requirements described above for their program, and within these constraints, must complete an interdisciplinary, biomedical first-year project in one of three ways: 1) complete a project in one laboratory which is inherently interdisciplinary, 2) have dual mentors in a biomedical area as well as in their home program (Social Developmental or the Cognitive Neuroscience), or 3) rotate in a biomedical and a Social Developmental or Cognitive Neuroscience laboratory. The Brain, Body, Behavior course requirements are two content courses and one additional quantitative methods course that satisfy the biomedical breadth requirements (the list of approved courses is updated annually). ( Courses taken to satisfy the biomedical breadth requirement can double count for the Social Developmental or Cognitive Neuroscience requirements). Brain, Body, Behavior students must attend an approved colloquium or journal club each semester during residency. Detailed information about approved courses and colloquia is available on the Department of Psychology website.

Course Requirements
Entering PhD students will take Advanced Psychological Statistics I (PSYC 210a) and one other course in the first term of residence. For Social Developmental students this course will be Graduate Research Methods in Psychology (PSYC 211a) if not taken prior to entering the graduate program; for Cognitive Neuroscience students it will be any advanced elective (100 level or above). In the second term, first-year students will take Advanced Psychological Statistics II (PSYC 210b), Proseminar in Brain, Body, and Behavior (PSYC 300a/302a), Responsible Conduct of Science (CONT 300b) and one advanced elective course. In the second year, students will take two advanced elective courses in the first term and one elective plus the Proseminar in Brain, Body, and Behavior (PSYC 300a/302a) in the second term. One elective advanced course is required each term in the third year. Throughout residency, all Social Developmental students are required to register for and attend the Psychology Research Seminar (PSYC 316a). In addition to PSYC 210a and PSYC 210b, Social Development students are required to take a third statistics course as an elective. Also throughout residency, all PhD students in psychology are required to take one research course each semester from the PSYC 200a-245a series taught by their faculty adviser.

Graduate-level courses in other departments or universities may satisfy Psychology requirements if selected in consultation with their faculty adviser.

Breadth Requirement
All PhD students must demonstrate breadth in the field of psychology. This breadth requirement is fulfilled by demonstrating competence in at least six of the nine areas listed below. The requirements may be satisfied in any of three ways:

A. By having completed an undergraduate or graduate course in that area.

B. By completing an undergraduate or graduate course offered in that area at Brandeis.

C. By successfully passing the equivalent of any undergraduate final examination for that course.

Of the six courses, a minimum of two must be taken from areas in Group A, a minimum of two from areas in Group B and, for BBB students, a minimum of two from areas in Group C.

Group A

  1. Physiological/Sensory Processes
  2. Perception
  3. Learning/Comparative
  4. Cognition/Memory
  5. Cognitive Science

Group B

  1. Developmental
  2. Social
  3. Personality
  4. Abnormal

Group C (BBB Students)

  1. Brain Imaging
  2. Behavioral Genomics
  3. General Psychology
  4. Computational Modeling
  5. Biomechanics
  6. System Control Theory
  7. Principles of Neuroscience
  8. Non-linear Dynamics
  9. Genetics: Cellular & Molecular
  10. Developmental Biology
  11. Genetics & Human Heredity
  12. Human Disease
  13. Other Approved Topic

Teaching Fellow Requirement
As an integral part of the graduate training program, all students are normally required to serve as teaching fellows six (6) times according to the following schedule: once during the second semester of year 1; once each during both semesters of years 2 and 3; and once during the first semester of year 4. The TF requirement can be reduced to four (4) for students appointed to qualifying research training grants, with the schedule depending on the period of appointment. All teaching fellows work closely with course instructors and receive guidance in all aspects of course preparation, teaching, and grading. Through exposure to different professors' styles, varied course formats, and presentations on teaching skills throughout their graduate training, teaching fellows come away with a wide range of experiences, providing them with invaluable preparation for academic positions.

Language Requirement
There is no foreign language requirement.

Dissertation and Defense
Following the completion of the required pre-doctoral research reports, the student will prepare a prospectus of the proposed dissertation study including a review of relevant research in consultation with a faculty dissertation adviser. The proposal may be based on the student's preliminary research. The written dissertation proposal and its oral defense must be approved by a committee of three Brandeis faculty. Upon approval of the proposal, a dissertation committee of three or more members will be appointed by the program chair, including the dissertation adviser as chair of the committee and one member from outside the department or the university. The dissertation adviser will be responsible for advising the student throughout the performance of his or her work, in consultation with the remaining members of the committee at appropriate times in the course of the work. From time to time, the committee will report the student's progress to the program faculty.

The dissertation should provide evidence of originality, scholarship, and research ability. It should be a contribution to knowledge; ordinarily an experimental investigation, but not necessarily so. Prior to scheduling the dissertation defense, the psychology department members of the dissertation committee must approve the adequacy of the student's data analysis. The award of the PhD will be recommended to the Faculty Council of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences upon submission to the chair of the program a copy of the dissertation, signed by all members of the dissertation committee, and a successful defense of the dissertation before all members of the program.

Special Note for PhD Candidates Earning a MA

Students in the PhD program may petition for a nonterminal master’s degree upon completion of the following requirements: (1) one-year minimum residency, (2) acceptable master’s thesis (an acceptable first-year research report for social developmental students or an acceptable third report for cognitive neuroscience students will count as a master’s thesis), and (3) completed breadth requirements.

Courses of Instruction

(1-99) Primarily for Undergraduate Students

NPSY 11b Introduction to Behavioral Neuroscience
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Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a) or MATH 10a or permission of the instructor. May meet the requirements for the major in Biology. Please see "Category 2" under the Requirements for the Major in Biology for further details or contact the Biology department.
Data and theories regarding current conceptions of brain-behavior relationships. Begins with an introduction to neural systems as classically defined (sensory, association, motor, autonomic), and moves on to examination of the biological underpinnings of various behaviors, from those relating to basic drives (reproduction, feeding) to those with a cognitive flavor. Throughout, the accent is on interactions between organisms and environment (learning). Usually offered every year.
Mr. Katz

NPSY 12a Perception: Human, Animal, and Machine
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Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a) or MATH 10a or permission of the instructor.
Examines the human senses, emphasizing sight and hearing, studied from standpoints of anatomy, physiology, and psychophysics. Insights from the study of special observers, including developmentally immature humans, members of nonhuman species, and people with abnormal sensory systems. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Sekuler

NPSY 16a Motor Control
[ sn ss ]
Prerequisites: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a) or MATH 10a or equivalents, and at least sophomore standing, or permission of the instructor.
Surveys control of vertebrate posture and movement from various perspectives including muscle properties, reflex organization, central pattern generation, spatial representations, learning, and development. Emphasizes research in physiology, psychology, biomechanics, and computational theory. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. DiZio

NPSY 17a Hand and Brain
[ sn ss ]
Enrollment limited to neuroscience and psychology majors with a minimum of 3.3. GPA, or with permission of the instructor.
The specialized developments of the human hand and the parallel developments of the brain, tool use, sign language, and language acquisition are discussed. The control of voluntary movements is a key focus. Includes laboratory demonstrations. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Lackner

NPSY 22b Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience
[ sn ss ]
Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a) or MATH 10a or permission of the instructor.
This course explores how the human brain makes the human mind. It covers neural and behavioral dimensions of attention, memory and learning, perception, motor control, plasticity and planning. Experimental approaches and neuroimaging are emphasized. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Sekuler

PSYC 2a Psychological and Socio-Cultural Perspectives on Health
[ ss ]
Does not meet the requirements for the major in psychology.
Surveys topics in psychology, sociology, and anthropology, with the aims of offering pre-health and pre-clinical psychology students topical knowledge and analytic competencies required for broad, liberal arts problem-solving, modern medical school and clinical psychology curricula and entrance exams. Usually offered every semester.
Ms. Wright

PSYC 10a Introduction to Psychology
[ ss ]
Formerly offered as PSYC 1a. PSYC 10a is the introductory course for Psychology majors and is a prerequisite for most other courses in the major. May not be taken for credit by students who took PSYC 1a in prior years.
A survey of contemporary psychology. Topics include brain and behavior, perception, memory, learning, cognitive processes, plasticity, intelligence, child and adult development, personality, social behavior, and the relationship between normal and abnormal behavior. Usually offered every semester.
Ms. Gutchess and Ms. Wright

PSYC 14a Comparative Psychology
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a) or MATH 10a.
The analysis of the behavior of organisms from a comparative and evolutionary perspective, considering genetic, humoral, sensory, and experiential factors in the control of behavior. Usually offered every year.
Staff

PSYC 15a Biological Bases of Motivation
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a) or MATH 10a.
Topics include hunger, thirst, migration, and sexual behavior. Evidence from biology, neurophysiology, and endocrinology is evaluated. Usually offered every year.
Staff

PSYC 21a Learning and Behavior
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a) or MATH 10a.
Current theories of learning will be explored in the light of experimental evidence derived from animal roles. Usually offered every year.
Staff

PSYC 31a Personality
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a).
Covers major personality theories and related research. Emphasis will be on application of theory, issues in personality assessment, and personality development across the life span. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Lachman and Ms. Wright

PSYC 32a Abnormal Psychology
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a).
A general introduction to psychopathology. Various theoretical models will be discussed. The techniques and findings of research, clinical, and experimental will be emphasized. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Knight and Ms. Wright

PSYC 33a Developmental Psychology
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a).
An examination of normal child development from conception through adolescence. Course will focus on theoretical issues and processes of development with an emphasis on how biological and environmental influences interact. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Watson

PSYC 34b Social Psychology
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a).
An introduction to theory and research on the psychological processes that relate the individual to the larger social world in terms of behaviors, thoughts, and feelings. Topics include attitudes, social perception, prejudice and discrimination, attraction, behavior in groups, and the role of culture. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Gutsell

PSYC 36b Adolescence and the Transition to Maturity
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a).
Examines the core issues (identity, intimacy, sexuality, spirituality, etc.) that define development during adolescence and the transition to young adulthood. Heavy emphasis is placed on integrating research and theory in understanding adolescence and young adulthood. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Wright

PSYC 37a The Psychology of Adult Development and Aging
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a).
Describes the sensory, cognitive, personality, health, and social changes that occur during early, middle, and later adulthood. Emphasis is on pathways to successful development and healthy aging in the context of a shifting balance of gains and losses in psychological and physical functioning. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Lachman

PSYC 38a Health Psychology
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a).
An examination of the social and psychological factors important for well-being, physical health, and effective medical care. Psychological perspectives are applied to such topics as health promotion and compromise, the stress-illness relationship, social relations, chronic illness, death and dying, and health care provider and patient interactions. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Rohleder and Ms. Wolf

PSYC 51a Statistics
[ qr ss ]
Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a) or the permission of the instructor. Students must consult with the department one semester before anticipated enrollment. This course normally should be completed by the end of the sophomore year.
Covers the fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistics. Techniques useful in the behavioral sciences will be emphasized. Students learn the theory of statistical decisions, practical application of statistical software, and how to analyze journal articles. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

PSYC 52a Research Methods and Laboratory in Psychology
[ qr ss wi ]
Prerequisites: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a) and 51a. In order to pre-enroll in this course, students must consult with the department one semester before anticipated enrollment. This course normally should be completed by the end of the sophomore year.
The laboratory/lecture offers supervised practice in experimental design, data analysis and interpretation, and formal presentation of experimental results. Usually offered every semester.
Ms. Wright and Staff

PSYC 92a Internship and Analysis in Psychology
Provides an opportunity for the student to supplement an off-campus internship experience with a related academic project. The specific requirements of the research component are negotiated by the student and the sponsoring faculty member. Usually offered every year.
Staff

PSYC 93a Independent Research in Psychological Sciences
Supervised research experience in a psychology laboratory environment, culminating in a research proposal or report. Usually offered every year.
Staff

PSYC 98a Readings in Psychological Literature
Usually offered every year.
Staff

PSYC 98b Readings in Psychological Literature
Usually offered every year.
Staff

PSYC 99d Senior Research
Usually offered every year.
Staff

(100-199) For Both Undergraduate and Graduate Students

NPSY 120b Man in Space
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Prerequisite: PHYS 10a (formerly PSYC 1a).
Topics include how orbital flight is achieved, spacecraft life support systems, circulatory dynamics, sensory-motor control and vestibular function in free fall, the physiological and psychological adaptations necessary in space flight, and how astronauts must readapt on return to Earth. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Lackner

NPSY 141a Stress, Physiology, and Health
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Prerequisites: NPSY 11b, NBIO 146a, PSYC 38a, or NPSY 199a.
About a third of all diseases in western society are related to stress. The study of psychosocial determinants of health is a growing field, in which biological and psychological research is combined to understand pathways between CNS processes and health. We will study these processes in this course. sually offered every year.
Mr. Rohleder

NPSY 154a Human Memory
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Prerequisite: PSYC 52a or NBIO 140b, or permission of the instructor.
Presents a systematic analysis of memory research and theory. The seminar will emphasize current research employing cognitive neuroscience methods, such as fMRI. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Gutchess

NPSY 174b Visual Cognition
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Prerequisite: NPSY 12a or permission of the instructor.
Higher-order processes in vision. Visual impact of cognitive and other top-down influences, including attention, expectation, plasticity, and learning. Focus on visual recognition, contour formation, segmentation, temporal binding, and face and object perception. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Sekuler

NPSY 196b Cognitive Neuroscience of Aging
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Prerequisite: PSYC 52a, NBIO 140a, or NPSY 199a.
This seminar covers current issues and research in memory, speech perception, and language comprehension. Emphasis will be placed on the current literature in the field. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Gutchess

NPSY 197a Advanced Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience
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Prerequisites: NPSY 11b and NBIO 140b or permission of the instructor.
Covers current research and issues pertaining to the neurobiology of perception (focusing mainly but not exclusively on perception of chemosensory signals) as well as the neurobiology of simple learning. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Katz

NPSY 199a Human Neuropsychology
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Prerequisite: Psych 10a (formerly PSYC 1a) or Math 10a and at least sophomore standing.
Designed as an introduction to human neuropsychology. Topics include cerebral dominance, neuroanatomical mapping, and localization of function, with special reference to language, memory, and related cognitive function. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Wingfield

PSYC 126a Pathways and Mechanisms Linking Emotions to Mental and Physical Health
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Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a).
Emotions are associated with mental and physical healthy and disorders such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and cardiovascular disease. This course surveys concepts of emotion and the physiological processes linking emotions to health, emphasizing stress as a mediator. Special one-time offering, spring 2015.
Ms. Lupis

PSYC 130b Life Span Development: Early and Middle Adulthood
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Prerequisites: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a), 31a or 33a, 51a, 52a, or permission of the instructor.
Seminar on advanced topics in life span developmental theory and methodology. Substantive emphasis will be on cognitive, personality, social, and physical changes that occur in early adulthood and midlife. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Lachman

PSYC 131a Child Development across Cultures
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Prerequisite: PSYC 33a or 36b. Juniors and seniors have priority for enrollment.
In this seminar child development is compared across two cultures within the United States: the dominant European American culture and Navajo culture. The main objective of the course is to help students learn about the processes involved as culture influences development. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Watson

PSYC 133a Seminar in Nonverbal Communication
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Prerequisites: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a), 51a, and 52a or permission of the instructor.
Seminar in advanced topics in nonverbal communication covering theoretical and methodological issues. Topics will include the nonverbal communication of one or more attributes (emotion, demographic qualities, identity, and personality traits) through various modalities (face, voice, body) and the factors that influence the accuracy of nonverbal communication. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Zebrowitz

PSYC 135b Seminar in Social Cognition
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Prerequisites: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a), 34b, 51a, 52a, and permission of the instructor.
Considers the general nature of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination, theoretical explanations for these phenomena, and methods for assessing them. Specific examples of stereotyping are discussed in light of research methods and theoretical issues. Attention is given to stereotype accuracy, self-fulfilling prophecy effects, and mechanisms for coping with stereotypes. Usually offered every third year.
Ms. Zebrowitz

PSYC 140a Statistical Analysis Software (SAS) Applications
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Prerequisite: PSYC 51a. Some introductory statistics experience will be helpful but not required. No prior SAS experience is required.
Designed for those who are interested in learning to use SAS. By using actual examples (data), students will have a hands-on experience using SAS for data management, data report, descriptive statistics, graphics, and some inferential statistics. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Liu

PSYC 142a Sport Psychology: A Health Psychology Perspective
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Prerequisite: NBIO 140b, NPSY 11b, NPSY 199a, or PSYC 38a, and permission of the instructor.
Applies health psychology to topics central to sport psychology and relevant to athletes, athletes' performance, such as optimal arousal levels, team cohesion, injury rehabilitation, imagery, burnout, and goal setting. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Wolf

PSYC 146a Evolutionary Psychology
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Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a), PSYC 51a, PSYC 52a or permission of the instructor.
Approaches psychology using two core ideas: evolution and computation. Investigates the mind as a functional system which performs computations to solve adaptive problems. Topics include perception, objects, tools, family, mates, trade, property, and culture. Usually offered every year.
Mr. DeScioli

PSYC 150b Organizational Behavior
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Prerequisites: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a), PSYC 51a, and PSYC 52a. May not be taken for credit by student who take BUS 20a. Open to juniors and seniors only.
Covers the fundamentals of industrial/organizational psychology, including the topics of leadership, work motivation, organizational culture, organizational structure, group dynamics, perception, decision making, and cross-cultural interaction. Assignments include group project analysis of real organizational dilemma using concepts covered in class. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Molinsky

PSYC 155a Interpersonal Sensitivity
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Prerequisites: PSYC 51a and PSYC 52a or the equivalent.
Discusses social psychological and neuroscience research on how we understand, share and respond to the inner states of others. Implications for prosocial behavior and morality will be addressed. The focus is on interactive discussions and critical thinking about research findings. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Gutsell

PSYC 160b Seminar on Sex Differences
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Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a), 51a, 52a or permission of the instructor.
Considers research evidence bearing on sex differences in the cognitive domain and in the social domain, evaluating this evidence in light of biological, cultural, and social-cognitive theories as well as methodological issues. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Wright

PSYC 161a Clinical Psychology Practicum I
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Prerequisites: PSYC 10a and 31a or 32a, and permission of the instructor. Students must enroll in this course in order to enroll in PSYC 161b and should enroll in this course only if they intend to enroll in PSYC 161b in the spring semester.
In conjunction with PSYC 161b, provides intensive supervised experience in mental health intervention. Students serve in helping roles as volunteers for eight hours a week in social service and mental health programs. They relate their experience to empirical and literary readings within the context of group supervision in weekly seminars. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Cunningham

PSYC 161b Clinical Psychology Practicum II
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Prerequisite: Students may enroll in the course only if they have completed PSYC 161a in the previous semester.
In conjunction with PSYC 161a, provides intensive supervised experience in mental health intervention. Students serve in helping roles as volunteers for eight hours a week in social service and mental health programs. They relate their experience to empirical and literary readings within the context of group supervision in weekly seminars. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Cunningham

PSYC 167b Schools of Psychotherapy
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Prerequisites: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a) and 32a. (Latter may be taken concurrently.)
The theories and techniques of several schools of psychotherapy and behavior modification are considered. The theories of personality, methods of intervention, goals of therapy, and relevant research will be emphasized. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Knight

PSYC 169b Disorders of Childhood
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Prerequisites: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a), 33a, and permission of the instructor. Seniors and juniors have priority for admission.
Issues of theory, research, and practice in the areas of child and family psychopathology and treatment are reviewed in the context of normal developmental processes. Usually offered every semester.
Mr. Cunningham

PSYC 172a Attachment, Separation, Risk and Resilience in Adoption and Foster Care
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Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a).
Explores contemporary psychological issues in adoption and foster care, utilizing a child-centered, developmental approach. Factors supporting and detrimental to adaptive transitions and child development will be discussed. Evidence-based theoretical constructs such as attachment, separation, risk and resilience will be analyzed in depth. Special one-time offering, spring 2014.
Ms. Wasserman

PSYC 193b Tests and Measurements
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Prerequisites: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a) and 51a.
Covers test theory, types of measurement, the theory and measurement of reliability and validity, and test construction. The measurement of intelligence, achievement, and personality are considered. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Knight

PSYC 195a History of Psychology
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Structuralism, Gestalt theory, William James (consciousness), functionalism, behaviorism, learning theories, psychoanalysis, Piaget, cognitive theories, and so on. Recommended for students taking the psychology GRE. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

(200 and above) Primarily for Graduate Students

PSYC 210a Advanced Psychological Statistics I
In conjunction with PSYC 210b, this course teaches students how to do independent data analysis in psychology at a PhD-level. Topics include methods for describing data, exploratory data analysis, elementary probability theory, null hypothesis significance testing and alternatives, the binomial distribution, contingency table analysis, one-way and factorial analysis of variance, and repeated measures analysis. Students receive extensive instruction in the use of the Statistical Program for the Social Sciences (SPSS). Usually offered every year.
Mr. Liu

PSYC 210b Advanced Psychological Statistics II
Prerequisite: PSYC 210a.
This course is a continuation of PSYC 210a. Topics include statistical power analysis, simple correlation and regression, multiple regression, nonparametric statistics, an introduction of logistic regression, and a brief introduction to multivariate procedures. Students learn to use multiple regression as a general data analytic system. More advanced instruction in SPSS is also provided. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Liu

PSYC 211a Graduate Research Methods in Psychology
A required course for all master's degree students, first-year doctoral students in the social developmental program, and selected undergraduate students by permission of the instructor. Students who are interested in this course must consult with the department one semester before anticipated enrollment.
The lecture offers supervised practice in research design, including experimental and correlational designs, data analysis and interpretation, and formal presentation of research results. Usually offered every year in the fall semester.
Mr. Liu and Staff

PSYC 213a Social Neuroscience and Culture
Introduction to empirical research on a breadth of social neuroscience topics-- including the self, stereotyping, and moral reasoning--with a more focused coverage of culture. Emphasis will be placed on literature comparing Eastern and Western cultures. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Gutchess

PSYC 215a Multivariate Statistics I: Applied Structural Equation Modeling
Prerequisites: PSYC 210a and b or equivalents.
Covers theory, methods, and applications of structural equation modeling (SEM) using LISREL. Introduces the conceptual and procedural principles underlying SEM, enables students to analyze data by using SEM methods, and exposes students to SEM techniques used in the literature. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Liu

PSYC 216a Multivariate Statistics II: Applied Hierarchical Linear Models
Prerequisite: PSYC 210a and b, or equivalent.
Acquaints students with the basic theory, methods, and most importantly, applications of hierarchical linear models (HLM). This course is designed to introduce the conceptual and procedural principles underlying HLM; enable students to analyze data by using the HLM methods; and expose students to the literature in which HLM techniques have been used. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Liu

PSYC 220a Research in Spatial Orientation
Open to PhD students only.
Mr. Lackner

PSYC 222a Research in Stress, Aging, and Health
Open to PhD students only.
Mr. Rohleder

PSYC 223a Research in Behavioral Neuroscience
Open to PhD students only.
Mr. Katz

PSYC 224a Research in Speech Perception and Cognitive Processes
Open to PhD students only.
Mr. Wingfield

PSYC 226a Research in Cognitive Processes and Psychopathology
Open to PhD students only.
Mr. Knight

PSYC 228a Research in Adolescent Health Psychology
Open to PhD students only.
Ms. Wolf

PSYC 229a Research in Person Perception
Open to PhD students only.
Ms. Zebrowitz

PSYC 230a Research in Animal Behavior
Open to PhD students only.
Mr. Wodinsky

PSYC 232a Research in Developmental Psychopathology
Open to PhD students only.
Mr. Cunningham

PSYC 233a Research in Visual Cognition
Open to PhD students only.
Mr. Sekuler

PSYC 234a Research in Life-Span Development
Open to PhD students only.
Ms. Lachman

PSYC 235a Research in Organizational Psychology
Open to PhD students only.
Mr. Molinsky

PSYC 236a Research in Developmental Psychology
Open to PhD students only.
Mr. Watson

PSYC 237b Research in Perceptual Development
Open to PhD students only.
Ms. Mitchell

PSYC 239a Research in Human Motor Control
Open to PhD students only.
Mr. DiZio

PSYC 240a Research in Visual Recognition and Learning
Open to PhD students only.
Mr. Fiser

PSYC 241a Research in Aging, Culture, and Cognition
Open to PhD students only.
Ms. Gutchess

PSYC 242a Research in Forensics
Open to PhD students only.
Mr. Knight

PSYC 243a Research in Emotion and Aging
Open to PhD students only.
Mr. Isaacowitz

PSYC 245a Research in Social Neuroscience
Open to PhD students only.
Ms. Gutsell

PSYC 250a Advanced Research Project
Usually offered every year.
Staff

PSYC 250b Master's Project Readings
Usually offered every year.
Staff

PSYC 280a Advanced Readings
Usually offered every year.
Staff

PSYC 300a Proseminar in Brain, Body, and Behavior I
Offers an in-depth review of primary sources in several major topic areas of social and developmental psychology. Usually offered every second year.
Staff

PSYC 302a Proseminar in Brain, Body, and Behavior II
An in-depth review of primary sources in several major topic areas of social and developmental psychology. Usually offered every second year.
Staff

PSYC 316a Psychology Research Seminar
Required of all social developmental program graduate students. Usually offered every year.
Staff

PSYC 400d Dissertation Research
Specific sections for individual faculty members as requested.
Staff

Cross-Listed in Psychology

ANTH 111a Aging in Cross-Cultural Perspective
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Examines the meanings and social arrangements given to aging in a diversity of societies, including the U.S., India, Japan and China. Key themes include: the diverse ways people envision and organize the life course, scholarly and popular models of successful aging, the medicalization of aging in the U.S., cultural perspectives on dementia, and the ways national aging policies and laws are profoundly influenced by particular cultural models. This course offers a 2-credit optional Experiential Learning practicum (EL 94a) Sages and Seekers, Aging and the Real World. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Lamb

ANTH 154a Culture and Mental Illness
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Without underestimating the importance of biological causes and treatments, this course challenges the hegemony of bio-medical models in psychiatry by seeking to conceptualize emotional problems and mental illness as historically situated and culturally constructed. Examines how factors related to political circumstances, social institutions, religious belief systems, socio-economic status, and ethnic background participate in shaping forms of distress and the ways they are dealt with in various socio-cultural settings. The course will also consider alternative therapies such as art therapy, community-based treatments, and culturally specific approaches to emotional healing and accommodation. Usually offered every third year.
Ms. Schattschneider

ANTH 155b Psychological Anthropology
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An examination of the relationship between sociocultural systems and individual psychological processes with a critical evaluation of selected theories and studies bearing on this problem. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. McIntosh

BUS 120a Organizational Behavior in Business
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Prerequisite: BUS 10a. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have taken PSYC 150b. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 20a in prior years.
Covers the fundamentals of organizational behavior, including topics like leadership, work motivation, organizational culture, organizational structure, group dynamics, perception, and decision-making in a global environment. Assignments include individual and group project analyses focused on topical business issues using course concepts. Usually offered every semester.
Ms. Cha and Mr. Suderow

COSI 118a Computer-Supported Cooperation
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Covers basic theory and concepts of computer-supported collaborative work and learning. Laboratory work enables the student to practice a set of basic techniques as they apply to the development of computer-mediated collaboration. The content and work of the course are specifically designed for an interdisciplinary class of students from computer science and the social sciences. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Alterman

COSI 125a Human-Computer Interaction
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Prerequisite: sophomore standing.
Covers the basic theory and concepts of human-computer interaction. Topics include methodology for designing and testing user interfaces, interaction styles and techniques, design guidelines, and adaptive systems. The laboratory work is designed to give the student practice in a set of basic techniques used in the area of human-computer interaction. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Alterman

ED 163b Creativity and Caring
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Explores "creativity" and "caring," significant human capacities, and their relationship. Drawing on developmental and social psychology, we ask: How do they develop? What affects our being creative and caring? How can educators promote these? Usually offered every year.
Mr. Reimer

HSSP 115b Perspectives on Behavioral Health: Alcohol, Drugs, and Mental Health
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A survey course which focuses on the science and biological basis of substance use and mental disorders, and linkages between behavioral health and general health. Consequences of behavioral health on society are discussed. Policy responses and the treatment system are assessed for their effectiveness. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Merrick and Ms. Reif

LGLS 142b Law and Psychology
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Examines a psychological perspective on the behavior of key players in the legal system, focusing on the trial process--both criminal and civil (personal injury). Explores the tension between human behavior and legal ideals of objectivity, based on current research, emphasizing biases leading to miscarriages of justice. Includes video analysis of jury behavior and courtroom advocacy. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Kabrhel

LING 173a Psycholinguistics
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An introduction to modern psycholinguistics, with an emphasis on sentence comprehension and production. Questions concerning species-specificity and the neurological organization of language are included for consideration. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Malamud

LING 197a Language Acquisition and Development
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Prerequisite: LING 100a or permission of the instructor.
The central problem of language acquisition is to explain what makes this formidable task possible. Theories of language acquisition are studied, and conclusions are based on recent research in the development of syntax, semantics, and phonology. The overall goal is to arrive at a coherent picture of the language learning process. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Malamud

NBIO 45a The Cognitive and Neurobiological Basis of Memory
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May meet the requirements for the major in Neuroscience. Please see "Neuroscience Electives" under the Requirements for the Major in Neuroscience for further details or contact the Neuroscience department.
How does the brain store and recall memories? We will review studies that have elucidated the molecular, cellular, and network mechanisms involved. This provides insights to deficits in memory, such as Alzheimer's disease, and into strategies for improving memory. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Lisman

NBIO 140b Principles of Neuroscience
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Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, BIOL 15b or BIOL 22b, and one of the following. One year of college-level chemistry with lab, one year of college-level physics with lab, or any math course above 10a,b. AP scores are not accepted to meet the prerequisite.
Examines the basic principles of neuroscience. Topics include resting potentials, action potentials, synaptic transmission, sensory systems, motor systems, learning, neural circuits underlying behavior, neurological diseases, and mental illness. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Turrigiano

NBIO 150a Autism and Human Developmental Disorders
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Prerequisite: BIOL 15b or BIOL 22b.
Autism and other developmental disorders are characterized by cognitive and behavioral deficits and by subtle changes in brain development. This course takes an integrative approach to investigate the biological, behavioral, medical, and social aspects of human developmental disorders. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Birren

NPHY 115a Dynamical Systems
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Prerequisites: MATH 10b and MATH 15a or PHYS 20a or equivalent.
Covers analytic, computational and graphical methods for solving systems of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. We study bifurcations, limit cycles, coupled oscillators and noise, with examples from physics, chemistry, population biology and many models of neurons. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Miller

PHIL 133a Consciousness, Brain, and Self
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Prerequisite: One course in philosophy, psychology, or neuroscience, or permission of the instructor.
Consciousness--sensing, feeling, thinking--is our life. But it's hard to understand how mere "meat puppets" like us could be conscious. Are scientists closing in on a solution? And if they are, what does that say about who we are and how we ought to live? Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Samet

Required First-Year Graduate Health-Related Science Programs Course

CONT 300b Responsible Conduct of Science
Required of all graduate students supported on a sponsored project. Not for credit.
Ethics is an essential aspect of scientific research. This course, taught by university faculty from several graduate disciplines, covers major ethical issues germane to the broader scientific enterprise, including areas or applications from a number of fields of study. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Karel