An interdepartmental program in Business

Last updated: August 27, 2014 at 3:49 p.m.

Objectives

Louis Brandeis was among the first to define business as a profession worthy of pursuit. Before his appointment to the Supreme Court, Brandeis practiced commercial law. He was fascinated both by the way business worked and the impact it had on society. While the business world of his day differed in many respects from that of our own, many of his insights still have the ability to open up new perspectives and stimulate debate.

The business program meets the growing need in the workplace for professionals and leaders with an open mind who are equipped to comprehend the complexities of today’s global society. At Brandeis, we believe that a business education consists of much more than the acquisition of a set of practical skills. We emphasize critical thinking, broad perspective, and multicultural understanding. In this way, we hope to prepare students to be responsible and thoughtful citizens in the business world of tomorrow.

The business program introduces undergraduates to the functions, opportunities, and challenges of business enterprises, and helps them to acquire skills and perspectives essential to a business career. Administered by the Brandeis International Business School (IBS) and the College of Arts and Sciences, the curriculum allows students to combine ideas and methods from liberal arts disciplines with an intensive education in business thinking and practice. The curriculum offers multiple paths for students to develop connections between their business studies and the "non-financial" measures of success they value – from concerns with global society and sustainability to innovation in science and art.

Students in the business program participate in IBS life. IBS professors teach undergraduate business courses, and students in the program regularly attend events and talks at the graduate school. Undergraduates enroll in graduate courses when appropriate.

Undergraduates have two choices to earn a master’s degree at an accelerated pace.

The BA/MA curriculum targets financial and economic skills needed to understand the global economy and operations of international capital markets. Students would enroll in the graduate school in their fourth year at Brandeis and receive the master’s in international finance and economics in their fifth year.

The BA/MBA dual degree program allows Brandeis graduates with a Bachelor of Arts (BA) or Bachelor of Science (BS) degree to complete the IBS MBA at an accelerated pace, and without a break in their studies. IBS offers this dual degree in cooperation with the School of Arts and Sciences (A&S) at Brandeis. Students will complete their BA or BS in one of the majors offered by A&S before enrolling in the MBA program at IBS.

Learning Goals

Five learning goals of the major:

1. Fundamental Concepts: Students will understand the fundamental concepts of business.

2. Business Disciplines: Students will have knowledge of key paradigms in core business disciplines.

3. Analytical Skills: Students will possess the quantitative, analytical, and critical thinking skills to evaluate businesses and the environment in which they operate.

4. Communications Skills: Students will have competence in a range of essential business communications skills.

5. Ethical Awareness: Students will be aware of the ethical, societal, and environmental implications of business decisions.


LEARNING GOAL CORRESPONDING BRANDEIS LEARNING GOAL ABILITIES COURSES IN WHICH WE MAY TEST GOALS
1. Fundamental Concepts: Students will understand the fundamental concepts of business. KNOWLEDGE a) Ability to use the language of business and management.
b) Ability to describe the structure of a business and its component parts.
c) Ability to describe the major factors influencing business formation and operations.
BUS 10a
2. Business Disciplines: Students will have knowledge of key paradigms in core business disciplines. KNOWLEDGE a) Knowledge of key principles in finance, organizational behavior, and marketing.
b) Ability to apply appropriate frameworks to problem-­‐ solving in those areas.
BUS 71a
BUS 120a
BUS 152a
3. Analytical Skills: Students will possess the quantitative, analytical, and critical thinking skills to evaluate businesses and the environment in which they operate. CORE SKILLS a) Ability to prepare and interpret basic financial statements.
b) Ability to use analytical techniques to assess the financial well-­‐being of a business.
c) Ability to use business school case studies to understand a management or industry issue.
BUS 6a
BUS 10a
BUS 71a
BUS 152a
4. Communications Skills: Students will have competence in a range of essential business communications skills. CORE SKILLS a) Ability to give a persuasive business presentation.
b) Ability to write a convincing business memo.
c) Ability to effectively advocate an idea.
BUS 10a
BUS 120a
BUS 152a
5. Ethical Awareness: Students will be aware of the ethical, societal, and environmental implications of business decisions. SOCIAL JUSTICE a) Ability to identify the ethical, societal, or environmental aspects of a business situation.
b) Ability to evaluate these factors when making business decisions.
BUS 6a
BUS 10a
BUS 71a
BUS 120a
BUS 152a

How to Become a Major or Minor

Students may apply for the major once they have completed (a) three full semesters of college study and (b) ECON 2a or ECON 10a, BUS 6a, and BUS 10a all with grades of C or better. There is a formal application process and students are not guaranteed admission into the program. The minor welcomes all students who wish to augment their liberal arts education with a brief but sophisticated overview of business issues. Students interested in learning about the major or minor should first consult the Business website. To declare the minor, students must have completed or currently be enrolled in BUS 10a. Student will then need to meet with the department program administrator to complete the minor declaration form. To learn more about the major, they should make an appointment with the Undergraduate Advising Head.

Committee

Edward Bayone, Chair
(International Business School; Business)

Brenda Anderson
(International Business School; The Heller School)

Maura Jane Farrelly
(American Studies; Journalism)

Richard Gaskins
(American Studies; Legal Studies)

Benjamin Gomes-Casseres
(International Business School)

George Hall
(Economics)

Scott Redenius
(Economics)

Hagit Weihs
(International Business School; Business)

Grace Zimmerman
(International Business School; Business)

Faculty

Edward Bayone, Chair
Credit risk. Real estate. Country risk.

Robert Angell
Accounting. Entrepreneurship. Financial management. 

Robert Carver
Applied Quantitative Methods. Regulatory Theory. Statistics Education.

Sandra Cha
Leadership. Identity in organizations. Organizational behavior.

Edward Chazen
Real estate investment analysis. Real estate finance and capital markets. Real estate development.

Jane Ebert
Consumer judgment and decision-making. Temporal discounting. Health promotion.

Barbara Finer
Marketing (B2B and startup), Business Development, Entrepreneurship and Leadership.

Michael Harrity
Real estate investment. Finance.

Richard Keith
Finance, planning, and control. Managerial accounting.

Ricardo Lopez
International Trade. Development Economics. Productivity Analysis. Latin America.

Michael McKay
Private Equity. Public Markets Investing.

Debarshi Nandy
Corporate Restructuring and Security Issuance. Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Finance.

William Oliver
Entrepreneurship. Microfinance. Healthcare Innovation. Evidence Based Management.

Robert Podorefsky
Fixed income. Currency derivatives. Risk management.

Mark Radding
Financial Accounting, Financial Services, Business Software Implementation.

Bharatendra Rai

Charles Reed
Entrepreneurship. General management. International marketing.

Paula Ryan
Marketing Research.

Detlev Suderow
International Human Resource Management. Organizational Development.

Anita Tucker

Xin Wang
E-commerce. Consumer Learning. Service Quality.

Hagit Weihs
Financial Accounting. Managerial Accounting. Financial Statement Analysis.

Grace Zimmerman
Strategic marketing. Business planning. International entrepreneurship.

Requirements for the Minor

A. Three basic courses in economics, accounting, and business: ECON 2a or ECON 10a, BUS 6a, and BUS 10a.

B. One non-ECON "Business and Society" course: refer to the "Thematic Electives in Business and Society" section.

C. Any one BUS course numbered above BUS 10a except BUS 89a or BUS 98a.

D. One additional course: any Business & Society elective (including ECON courses) or Business Administration elective.

E. No course with a final grade below C, and no course taken pass/fail, can count toward fulfilling the requirements for the minor in business. C- is the minimum grade for Business and Society courses for the Business minor. Students petition the Business program for the C- grade towards the Business and Society electives for the minor.

Requirements for the Major

A. ECON 2a or ECON 10a.

B. BUS 1b. May be exempted by the following quantitative courses: BIOL 51a, ECON 83a, MATH 8a, or PSYC 51a.

C. BUS 6a, BUS 10a, BUS 71a, BUS 120a, BUS 152a, and BUS 172a.

D. Two "Business and Society" electives, and two "Business Administration" electives.

No course with a final grade below C, and no course taken pass/fail, can count toward fulfilling the requirements for the major in Business. C- is the minimum grade for Business and Society courses for the Business major.

Students undertaking the economics major and the business major are subject to additional restrictions. Business majors may double count no more than two courses for the Economics major. Excluded in this calculation are: ECON 2a or ECON 10a, ECON 83a to exempt from BUS 1b, and ECON 171a in place of BUS 71a. Please note that ECON 171a cannot be counted twice (i.e., in place of BUS 71a and as a "Business Administration" elective). PSYC 150b, which has several prerequisites, may be taken in place of BUS 120a.

For Business and Economics double majors, BUS 10a (required for the Business major) will count as a lower level elective for Economics and ECON 20a (required for the Economics major) will count as a Business and Society elective for Business. As a result, no further "double-counts" are allowed for the Business major, except as noted in the requirements for the Business Major.

Specialization is achieved by taking three courses on one of the six designated themes (see III.A and III.B). This specialization does not appear on the transcript, but may be reported in a resume.

Special Notes Relating to Majors and Minors

Upon prior approval of the Undergraduate Advising Head, more advanced BUS or FIN courses in the International Business School or courses taken during a Brandeis-approved study abroad may be used as substitutes for BUS courses in the program. Students who are studying abroad will not be permitted to take substitutes for BUS 6a, BUS 10a, BUS 120a, BUS 152a, and BUS 172a. The same rule applies for summer study at another university, with the exception of BUS 6a, which may be considered if taught in the United States to US GAAP (generally accepted accounting principles). Any exemption to the previously listed rules requires approval by petition. See the program administrator or the Undergraduate Advising Head.

Transfer students may apply to the Undergraduate Advising Head for courses taught elsewhere to fulfill the requirements for the major or minor, with the provision that at Brandeis they must take BUS 10a (unless waived by the Undergraduate Advising Head) and a minimum of four other full semester BUS courses for the major, or two other full semester BUS courses for the minor. In addition, for both the major and minor, transfer students must take at least one course at Brandeis in Section III.A Business and Society.

BUS 89a or BUS 98a do not provide credit towards the business major or minor, but it is a four-credit course that counts as one of a student’s thirty-two courses.

Students interested in taking a BUS internship for credit should consult the description and enrollment information for BUS 89a (below) or the Business website for more information. Most BUS 89a students do their internships in the same semester they enroll for the classes, but internships can also be done during a prior academic semester or summer. Priority will be given to Business and Economics majors. Consideration will also be given to Business minors who intend to apply for the Business major. All other students should register for INT 89b (or 89a courses offered by other majors). Searching the university’s main website for "internships" will lead to information on availability of courses, guidelines, and requirements.

THEMATIC ELECTIVES IN BUSINESS AND SOCIETY (III.A)

Communications, Commerce, and Culture Courses
AMST 103b Advertising and the Media
AMST 190a Money, Markets and Morals in American Culture
ANTH 26a Communication and Media
ANTH 70a Business, Culture and Society
ANTH 163b Production, Consumption, and Exchange
CLAS 121b Money, Markets, and Society in the Ancient Mediterranean
CLAS 149b Sailing the Wine Dark Sea: Global Trade in the Ancient Mediterranean
COSI 133b Internet & Society
ECON/FA 87a Economics and the Arts
ENG 188b Capitalism and Culture
NEJS 157a Jewish Business Ethics
PHIL 13b Idea of the Market: Economic Policies
PHIL 25a Business Ethics
PSYC 34b Social Psychology
SOC 120b Globalization and the Media
SOC 150b Culture of Consumption
THA 138a The Business of Show Business
WMGS 152a Women as Leaders in the Business Realm

Environment, Health and Social Policy Courses
AMST 118a Gender in Professions
ECON 57a Environmental Economics
ECON 76b Labor Economics
HIST 157a Labor and Class Conflict in America, 1676-2012
HS 104b American Health Care
HS 110a Wealth & Poverty
HSSP 104b Health Economics
HSSP 106a Managing Medicine
HSSP 107b Health Care Technology: Evaluating Emerging Medical Services, Drugs and Devices
SOC 112b Social Class and Social Change
SOC 117a Sociology of Work and Gender
SOC 175b Environmental Movements: Organizations, Networks, and Partnerships
SOC 193a Environment, Health, Society

Law and Government Courses
AAAS 126b Political Economy of the Third World
AMST 188b Louis Brandeis: Law, Business & Politics
AMST 189a Legal Foundations of American Capitalism
ECON 20a Introduction to Macroeconomics
HIST 160b American Legal History II
LGLS 114a American Health Care: Law and Policy
LGLS 127b International Economic Law
LGLS 138b Science on Trial
POL 172b Introduction to International Political Economy
SOC 123b The Welfare State and Nonprofit America

THEMATIC ELECTIVES IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (III.B)

Management Courses
BUS 114a Managerial Accounting
BUS 135a Real Estate & Society
BUS 155a Consumer Behavior
BUS 170a Business in the Global Economy

Finance Courses
ECON 161a International Finance
ECON 171a Financial Economics
ECON 172b Money and Banking
ECON 174a Corporate Finance

Innovation Courses
BUS 130a Entrepreneurship and Innovation
ECON 135a Industrial Organization
ECON 141b Economics of Innovation

Marketing Courses
BUS 154aj Branding Strategy
BUS 157aj Marketing Communications
BUS 195aj Field Projects in Business (Marketing)

Real Estate Courses
BUS 137aj Real Estate Finance
Bus 138aj Real Estate Development
Bus 195aj Field Projects in Business (Real Estate)

Courses of Instruction

(1-99) Primarily for Undergraduate Students

BUS 1b Quantitative Methods in Business
Does not fulfill the School of Social Science requirement. Yields half-course credit.
Introduction to statistical thinking and fundamental analytical methods to students with little or no prior statistics training. Surveys basic statistical methods used to enable critical analysis of data to inform business decisions, accomplished through the use of Excel, PowerPoint and Word. Usually offered every semester.
Mr. Oliver and Mr. Rai

BUS 6a Financial Accounting
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: ECON 2a or ECON 10a.
Develops basic concepts and accounts and applies them to income measurement, capital values, and costs. Through the use of cases, develops the basis for rational choice and control of business activity. Usually offered every semester in multiple sections.
Mr. Angell, Mr. Radding and Ms. Weihs

BUS 10a Functions of the Capitalist Enterprise
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 6a. BUS 6a may be taken concurrently with BUS 10a.
Introduces the internal complexity of modern businesses and the various roles they play in society. First examines the internal workings of firms--marketing, operations, finance, and other functions. Subsequently, the relationships between businesses and their context--the economy, social issues, and government are studied. Usually offered every semester in multiple sections.
Mr. Bayone, Mr. Carver, and Mr. Oliver

BUS 71a Introduction to Finance
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 1b and BUS 6a. This course cannot be counted as an elective toward the Economics major or minor.
Introduces students to topics and methods in the field of finance. Covers how firms secure financing via equity and debt markets, valuation of stocks and bonds, fundamental analysis techniques, capital budgeting techniques, relationship of risk and return, and the time-value-of-money. Usually offered every semester.
Mr. McKay, Mr. Nandy and Mr. Podorefsky

BUS 89a Work in the Global Business Environment: Internship and Seminar
Does not meet the requirements for the major or minor in Business.
Normally students arrange an internship placement prior to registration and the internship is concurrent with the seminar. Students wishing to fulfill the internship component during the summer must obtain approval from the instructor prior to the internship and then enroll in the following fall (or spring) semester. The course will meet every other week and a structured journal documenting the internship experience is required as a basis for seminar participation. The course encourages students to pool experiences and lessons drawn from various business environments and to analyze and discuss them in the context of related readings. Usually offered every semester.
Mr. Suderow

BUS 98a Independent Study
Does not meet the requirements for the major or minor in Business.
Normally available for a student who has taken a course and wishes to pursue further reading or research in that field or study a subject not listed among the department course offerings. Usually offered every year.
Staff

(100-199) For Both Undergraduate and Graduate Students

BUS 114a Managerial Accounting
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 6a. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 14a in prior years.
Introduction to the principles, concepts, and methods of managerial accounting, including internal reporting used in planning, control, and decision making. Learn how organizations use this information to measure and control resources used in producing goods and providing services. Usually offered every semester.
Mr. Keith and Ms. Weihs

BUS 120a Organizational Behavior in Business
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 10a. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have taken PSYC 150b. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 20a in prior years.
Covers the fundamentals of organizational behavior, including topics like leadership, work motivation, organizational culture, organizational structure, group dynamics, perception, and decision-making in a global environment. Assignments include individual and group project analyses focused on topical business issues using course concepts. Usually offered every semester.
Ms. Cha and Mr. Suderow

BUS 130a Entrepreneurship and Innovation
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 10a. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 30a in prior years.
Explores why, when, and how to start a new business venture. Includes identifying opportunities, gaining access to resources, and assembling a team with key skills. Uses lectures, case discussions, and outside speakers to introduce issues in both theory and practice. Usually offered every semester.
Mr. Reed

BUS 135a Real Estate and Society
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 10a. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 35a in prior years.
Provides students with the fundamentals of real estate investment analysis and examines major trends and current issues: affordable housing; preservations, conservation, and environmentalism; green construction; new urbanism and smart growth; and the meltdown in the capital markets. Usually offered every semester.
Mr. Chazen and Mr. Harrity

BUS 137a Real Estate Finance
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 135a.
Examines real estate finance from the perspective of the users of capital (developers and property owners) and the sources of capital (lenders and equity investors). Also considers the role of the public sector in using tax payer funds to advance public purposes by offering various kinds of subsidies to developers, and evaluating the relative success of such programs. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Chazen

BUS 137aj Real Estate Finance
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 135a.
Examines real estate finance from the perspective of the users of capital (developers and property owners) and the sources of capital (lenders and equity investors). Also considers the role of the public sector in using tax payer funds to advance public purposes by offering various kinds of subsidies to developers, and evaluating the relative success of such programs. Offered as part of JBS program.
Mr. Chazen

BUS 138a Real Estate Development
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 135a.
Focuses on the real estate development process, including zoning and planning, permitting, site analysis and acquisition, design and construction, financing, leasing, and value enhancement. Also considers the role of the community and regulators in supporting or objecting to a real estate project; and, the role of the public sector in using tax payer funds to advance public purposes. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Chazen

BUS 138aj Real Estate Development
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 135a.
Focuses on the real estate development process, including zoning and planning, permitting, site analysis and acquisition, design and construction, financing, leasing, and value enhancement. Also considers the role of the community and regulators in supporting or objecting to a real estate project; and, the role of the public sector in using tax payer funds to advance public purposes. Offered as part of JBS program.
Mr. Chazen

BUS 152a Marketing Management
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 1b and BUS 10a. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 52a in prior years.
An introduction to key concepts in competitive strategy and marketing, which are used to help firms create, sustain, and capture value. Topics include industry analysis, competitive advantage, market identification, and marketing policies. Incorporates case studies, discussion method, team projects, and business research. Usually offered every semester.
Ms. Ebert, Ms. Ryan, and Ms. Zimmerman

BUS 153a Marketing Research
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 52a. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 53a in prior years.
Marketing research is critical to business success in today's information economy. We will learn quantitative marketing research models and techniques for analyzing consumer behavior and marketing information. Topics include marketing segmentation, targeted promotion strategies, brand positioning, new produce design, and customer profitability. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Wang

BUS 154a Branding Strategy
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 152a.
Examines strategies to build and sustain brands, from development of highly differentiated value propositions, through promotional, pricing and distribution strategies. A competitive, online team-based simulation exercise is used to enhance case studies and provide a competitive learning environment. Usually offered every third year.
Ms. Zimmerman

BUS 154aj Branding Strategy
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 152a.
Examines strategies to build and sustain brands, from development of highly differentiated value propositions, through promotional, pricing and distribution strategies. A competitive, online team-based simulation exercise is used to enhance case studies and provide a competitive learning environment. Offered as part of JBS program.
Ms. Zimmerman

BUS 155a Consumer Behavior
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 52a. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 55a in prior years.
Examines fundamental theories and concepts in consumer psychology. Learn about new findings to enhance understanding of how and why people choose, use and evaluate goods and services the way they do. This knowledge will come from lectures, readings, and discussions in class, but also from hands-on experiential learning through involvement in a semester-long group project. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Ebert

BUS 157a Marketing Communications
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 152a.
Explores the activities a company undertakes to educate, engage and prompt to action its various target consumer segments. Topics include advertising, promotions, event sponsorship, internet marketing, social media marketing, corporate blogs, word-of-mouth advertising, and marketing communications for social initiatives. Usually offered every third year.
Ms. Zimmerman

BUS 157aj Marketing Communications
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 152a.
Explores the activities a company undertakes to educate, engage and prompt to action its various target consumer segments. Topics include advertising, promotions, event sponsorship, internet marketing, social media marketing, corporate blogs, word-of-mouth advertising, and marketing communications for social initiatives. Offered as part of JBS program.
Ms. Zimmerman

BUS 170a Business in the Global Economy
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 10a. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 70a in prior years.
Modern firms frequently cross national borders to find new markets and resources. Their strategies are then shaped by the international economy and by the policies of national governments. Using case discussion, students explore why and how U.S., Japanese, and European firms operate outside their home countries. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Lopez

BUS 172a Operations Management
[ ss ]
Prerequisites: BUS 1b and BUS 10a.
Operations Management is the scientific study and optimization of the processes that organizations use to create the products/services purchased by their customers. Topics include process analysis, the impact of variability on process performance, quality management (lean production and six sigma), project management, inventory management, supply chain coordination, revenue management and operations strategy. Usually offered every semester.
Ms. Tucker

BUS 195a Field Projects in Business
[ ss ]
Provides students with the opportunity to apply their skills and knowledge to solving actual client problems, assessing client challenges and opportunities and generally adding value to the client's operations. The course culminates in a final client presentation before the semester ends. The instructor will serve as project manager for all projects. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Chazen and Ms. Zimmerman

BUS 195aj Field Projects in Business
[ ss ]
Provides students with the opportunity to apply their skills and knowledge to solving actual client problems, assessing client challenges and opportunities and generally adding value to the client's operations. The course culminates in a final client presentation before the semester ends. The instructor will serve as project manager for all projects. Offered as part of JBS program.
Mr. Chazen and Ms. Zimmerman

Core Courses

BUS 1b Quantitative Methods in Business
Does not fulfill the School of Social Science requirement. Yields half-course credit.
Introduction to statistical thinking and fundamental analytical methods to students with little or no prior statistics training. Surveys basic statistical methods used to enable critical analysis of data to inform business decisions, accomplished through the use of Excel, PowerPoint and Word. Usually offered every semester.
Mr. Oliver and Mr. Rai

BUS 6a Financial Accounting
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: ECON 2a or ECON 10a.
Develops basic concepts and accounts and applies them to income measurement, capital values, and costs. Through the use of cases, develops the basis for rational choice and control of business activity. Usually offered every semester in multiple sections.
Mr. Angell, Mr. Radding and Ms. Weihs

BUS 10a Functions of the Capitalist Enterprise
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 6a. BUS 6a may be taken concurrently with BUS 10a.
Introduces the internal complexity of modern businesses and the various roles they play in society. First examines the internal workings of firms--marketing, operations, finance, and other functions. Subsequently, the relationships between businesses and their context--the economy, social issues, and government are studied. Usually offered every semester in multiple sections.
Mr. Bayone, Mr. Carver, and Mr. Oliver

BUS 71a Introduction to Finance
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 1b and BUS 6a. This course cannot be counted as an elective toward the Economics major or minor.
Introduces students to topics and methods in the field of finance. Covers how firms secure financing via equity and debt markets, valuation of stocks and bonds, fundamental analysis techniques, capital budgeting techniques, relationship of risk and return, and the time-value-of-money. Usually offered every semester.
Mr. McKay, Mr. Nandy and Mr. Podorefsky

BUS 120a Organizational Behavior in Business
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 10a. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have taken PSYC 150b. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 20a in prior years.
Covers the fundamentals of organizational behavior, including topics like leadership, work motivation, organizational culture, organizational structure, group dynamics, perception, and decision-making in a global environment. Assignments include individual and group project analyses focused on topical business issues using course concepts. Usually offered every semester.
Ms. Cha and Mr. Suderow

BUS 152a Marketing Management
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 1b and BUS 10a. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 52a in prior years.
An introduction to key concepts in competitive strategy and marketing, which are used to help firms create, sustain, and capture value. Topics include industry analysis, competitive advantage, market identification, and marketing policies. Incorporates case studies, discussion method, team projects, and business research. Usually offered every semester.
Ms. Ebert, Ms. Ryan, and Ms. Zimmerman

ECON 2a A Survey of Economics
[ qr ss ]
Intended for students who are not Economics majors or minors. May not be taken for credit by students who took ECON 10a in prior years.
Introduces economic analysis with policy applications. The economist's approach to social analysis is systematically elaborated. Usually offered every semester.
Mr. Coiner

ECON 10a Introduction to Microeconomics
[ qr ss ]
Intended for Economics majors and minors or students who intend to take more than one Economics course. Students who have taken Econ 2a and received a B+ or better cannot receive credit for this course. May not be taken for credit by students after they have taken ECON 80a.
Introduces the field of microeconomics, which is the study of how individuals and firms make decisions and how these decisions interact. Usually offered every semester.
Mr. Coiner

Elective Courses in Business and Society

AAAS 126b Political Economy of the Third World
[ nw ss wi ]
Development of capitalism and different roles and functions assigned to all "Third Worlds," in the periphery as well as the center. Special attention will be paid to African and Afro-American peripheries. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Nyangoni

AMST 103b Advertising and the Media
[ ss ]
Combines a historical and contemporary analysis of advertising's role in developing and sustaining consumer culture in America with a practical analysis of the relationship between advertising and the news media in the United States. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Farrelly

AMST 188b Louis Brandeis: Law, Business and Politics
[ ss ]
Brandeis's legal career serves as model and guide for exploring the ideals and anxieties of American legal culture throughout the twentieth century. Focuses on how legal values evolve in response to new technologies, corporate capitalism, and threats to personal liberty. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Gaskins

AMST 189a Legal Foundations of American Capitalism
[ ss ]
Surveys core legal institutions of property, contracts, and corporations. Examines how law promotes and restrains the development of capitalism and market society in America, from the era of mass production through the age of global trade and digital commerce. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Gaskins

AMST 190a Money, Markets and Morals in American Culture
[ ss ]
How have Americans expected businessess and people in business to behave? This course examines the ambivalences and complexities from the 17th century to the present, using case studies drawn from history, literature and social commentary. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Terris

ANTH 26a Communication and Media
[ ss ]
An exploration of human communication and mass media from a cross-cultural perspective. Examines communication codes based on language and visual signs. The global impact of revolutions in media technology, including theories of cultural imperialism and indigenous uses of media is discussed. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. McIntosh

ANTH 70a Business, Culture and Society
[ ss ]
In a diverse and rapidly changing global marketplace, it is crucial to understand local traditions, customs and cultural preferences. In this course, we adopt anthropological approaches to understand their impact on business practices, products, services, clients and ideas. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Tankha

ANTH 163b Production, Consumption, and Exchange
[ nw ss ]
Prerequisite: ANTH 1a, ECON 2a, ECON 10a, or permission of the instructor.
We read in newspapers and books and hear in everyday discussion about "the economy," an identifiably separate sphere of human life with its own rules and principles and its own scholarly discipline (economics). The class starts with the premise that this "commonsense" idea of the economy is only one among a number of possible perspectives on the ways people use resources to meet their basic and not-so-basic human needs. Using extensive cross-cultural case studies, looks at the satisfaction of these needs (which we might call economic activity) as they interact with other aspects of life: gender, kinship, ideas of morality and taste, spirit possession, politics, and so on. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Ferry

CLAS 121b Money, Markets and Society in the Ancient Mediterranean
[ hum wi ]
Examines the complex interactions between economic and social systems in the ancient Mediterranean, especially Greece and Rome, through literature, documents, and artifacts. Readings in English. Usually offered every third year.
Ms. Walker

CLAS 149b Sailing the Wine Dark Sea: Global Trade in the Ancient Mediterranean
[ hum wi ]
Investigates the development of commodity production and global exchange in the ancient Mediterranean. Approached from multiple disciplinary perspectives and through both global and local lenses, this course will study commodity consumption as a social, cultural and material process. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Koh

COSI 133b Internet and Society
[ sn ]
Prerequisite: sophomore standing.
An interdisciplinary survey of the Internet. Taught by a team of professors from several different departments, the course content will vary from year to year. Some particular topics to be covered are the architecture of the Internet (and the implications this has on its regulation), intellectual property, privacy, censorship, e-commerce, online education, and research. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Hickey

ECON 20a Introduction to Macroeconomics
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: Econ 2a with a B+ or higher or Econ 10a. May not be taken for credit by students after they have taken ECON 82b. May not be taken concurrently with ECON 82b.
Introduces the field of macroeconomics. Macroeconomics is the study of the overall or aggregate economic performance of national economies. Usually offered every semester.
Mr. Redenius and Mr. Hall

ECON 57a Environmental Economics
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: ECON 2a or 10a.
Investigates the theoretical and policy problems posed by the use of renewable and nonrenewable resources. Theoretical topics include the optimal pricing of resources, the optimal use of standards and taxes to correct pollution problems under uncertainty, and the measurement of costs and benefits. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Bui

ECON 76b Labor Economics
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: ECON 2a or 10a.
Analysis of competitive and less-than-competitive markets. Rationale for alternate methods of paying workers (e.g., hourly wages, piece rates, bonuses). Sources of wage differentials among jobs and workers. The U.S. labor movement, the process of collective bargaining, and the economic effects of unions. Effects of government interventions in the labor market, such as the minimum wage and occupational safety regulation. Extent and effects of discrimination in the labor market. Inequality in the distribution of wages. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Brainerd

ECON/FA 87a Economics and the Arts
[ ca ss ]
Prerequisite: ECON 2a or 10a; FA 30a, 57a, 59a or 62a. The FA course may be taken concurrently with ECON/FA 87a.
Economics and art history provide dual lenses for studying the mechanics of art auctions and building collections. The course will focus on the intersection of history and patronage of specific artists and works of art with the marketplace. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Graddy and Ms. Scott

ENG 188b Capitalism and Culture
[ hum ]
What characterizes literary accounts of capitalism processes? How do authors from different periods or regions narrate the history of capitalism? What do they describe as the central conflicts between capitalism and other pre-, post-, or non-capitalist economic systems? Usually offered every third year.
Ms. Irr

HIST 157a Labor and Class Conflict in America, 1676-2012
[ ss ]
Despite the persistent ideal of a "classless" society, questions of class and the nature of labor have informed much of America’s history. Beginning in the colonial period, this course explores the idea that a job is never just a job; it is also a social signifier of great value. Topics include slavery and servitude, race and gender in the workplace, household labor and its meanings, working-class political movements, the role of the state in shaping patterns of work, and modern debates over economic inequality. Usually offered every fourth year.
Mr. Bowman

HIST 160b American Legal History II
[ ss ]
Survey of American legal development from 1865 to the present. Major topics include constitutionalism and racial inequality, the legal response to industrialization, progressivism and the transformation of liberalism, the rise of the administrative state, and rights-based movements for social justice. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Willrich

HS 104b American Health Care
[ ss ]
Examines and critically analyzes the United States health care system, emphasizing the major trends and issues that have led to the current sense of "crisis." In addition to providing a historical perspective, this course will establish a context for analyzing the current, varied approaches to health care reform. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Altman

HS 110a Wealth and Poverty
[ ss ]
Examines why the gap between richer and poorer citizens appears to be widening in the United States and elsewhere, what could be done to reverse this trend, and how the widening disparity affects major issues of public policy. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Shapiro

HSSP 104b Health Economics
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: ECON 2a or 10a.
Emphasizes the concepts and tools of health economics applicable to both developed and developing countries. Topics include: cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis, the demand for health services, insurance and risk, managed care, provider reimbursement, national health insurance, and an overview of health care systems in other countries. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Hodgkin

HSSP 106a Managing Medicine
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: HS 104b or LGLS 114a.
Overview of the principles of management within health-care organizations. Through case studies of real hospitals, insurers, and firms, the class examines choices of clinicians and managers aimed at improving quality, containing costs, driving technology adoption, or promoting new ventures. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Zinner

HSSP 107b Health Care Technology: Evaluating Emerging Medical Services, Drugs and Devices.
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: HS 104b or permission of the instructor. Priority given to HSSP majors and minors.
An overview of the role of medical technology in the U.S. health care system, with a focus on the impact of prescription drugs on the health care system, their promise for the future, and inherent risks. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Thomas

LGLS 114a American Health Care: Law and Policy
[ ss ]
Not recommended for freshmen.
Focuses on individual rights, highlights how our laws and policies affect American health care. Traces the evolution of the doctor-patient relationship; explores access issues, including whether health care is or should be a fundamental right; assesses the quality of care and the impact of malpractice; and examines the cost of having (or not having) adequate health insurance. Concludes with options and prospects for meaningful reform. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Curi

LGLS 114aj American Health Care: Law and Policy
[ ss ]
Emphasizes the interplay of law, public policy, and social justice, focusing on health care reform. After considering the background leading up to passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the policy innovations it promotes, particularly with regard to cost, quality, and access, students will consider the current challenges to implementing this ambitious law. By examining the complex structure of the American health care system, in contrast to systems in other advanced countries, we will explore to what extent the ACA promotes the just distribution of quality health care. Offered as part of the JBS program.
Ms. Noble

LGLS 127b International Economic Law
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: ECON 2a or ECON 10a or permission of the instructor.
Studies the transnational legal institution and practices that constitute the global economic networks of the 21st century. Surveys the fields of corporate regulation, including business practices and human rights, and legal regimes supporting trade and finance. Practice in arbitrating investment disputes between states and corporations. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Mirfendereski

LGLS 138b Science on Trial
[ qr ss ]
Surveys the procedures and analytic methods by which scientific data enter into litigation and regulation/policy making. Introduces basic tools of risk analysis and legal rules of evidence. Case studies of tobacco litigation and regulation; use of DNA and other forensic evidence in the criminal justice system; the Woburn ground-water contamination case; and other topics to be selected, such as genetics in the courtroom, court-ordered Cesarean sections, polygraph testing, alternative medicine, and genetically modified foods. Usually offered every second year.
Staff

NEJS 157a Jewish Business Ethics
[ hum ]
How can we think through the moral question of business and economic life? What might Jewish texts and historical experience have to teach us here? How do we think critically and constructively about business and Judaic sources alike, while trying to lead moral lives? All this is explored through readings, examples, and lively discussion. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Mirsky

PHIL 25a Business Ethics
[ hum ]
Offers an introduction to ethical theory and ethical reasoning, as they relate to business issues in particular, especially questions about what ethical constraints (if any) should limit a company's pursuit of profit. Special one-time offering, spring 2014.
Mr. Sherman

POL 172b Seminar: International Political Economy
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
The politics and modern evolution of international economic relations, comprising trade, money, multinational productions, and development. Also the role of states and transnational actors in international markets and the global differentiation of power, and distribution of wealth. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Chase

PSYC 34b Social Psychology
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: PSYC 10a (formerly PSYC 1a).
An introduction to theory and research on the psychological processes that relate the individual to the larger social world in terms of behaviors, thoughts, and feelings. Topics include attitudes, social perception, prejudice and discrimination, attraction, behavior in groups, and the role of culture. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Gutsell

SOC 112b Social Class and Social Change
[ ss ]
Presents the role of social class in determining life chances, lifestyles, income, occupation, and power; theories of class, inequality, and globalization; selected social psychological aspects of social class and inequality; and connections of class, race, and gender. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Fellman

SOC 117a Sociology of Work and Gender
[ ss ]
Many people think gender differences in work are disappearing. Yet gender segregation by job type is pervasive and women predominate in the lower paid, lower status jobs, particularly in the care sector. Women are also still doing disproportional amounts of domestic and parenting labor at home, which exacts a great cost from them in the paid workforce. This course examines gender disparities in both paid an unpaid work, and how that affects women’s and men’s lives, work/family conflicts, and society at large. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Villalobos

SOC 120b Globalization and the Media
[ ss ]
Investigates the phenomenon of globalization as it relates to mass media. Topics addressed include the growth of transnational media organizations, the creation of audiences that transcend territorial groupings, the hybridization of cultural styles, and the consequences for local identities. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Miller

SOC 123b The Welfare State and Nonprofit America
[ ss ]
Studies major programs of the welfare state in social security, health, and welfare, as well as local nonprofits in youth development and other human services, national foundations, social entrepreneurism, AmeriCorps, and other forms of community service. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Sirianni

SOC 150b Culture of Consumption
[ ss ]
Examines the historical development and social significance of a culture of consumption. Considers the role of marketing in contemporary society and the expression of consumer culture in various realms of everyday life, including leisure, the family, and education. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Miller

SOC 175b Environmental Movements: Organizations, Networks, and Partnerships
[ oc ss ]
Studies environmental movement organizations and field strategies, national advocacy organizations, as well as community-based and civic approaches to environmental problem solving. Case studies draw from sustainable and climate resilient cities, watersheds, coastal adaptation, forests, ecosystem restoration, environmental justice, renewable energy, and the greening of industry. May be combined with internships and action research. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Sirianni

SOC 193a Environment, Health, and Society
[ ss ]
This course draws on sociological perspectives to examine two key questions: (1) How does social organization enter into the production of environmental health and illness? and (2) How do scientists, regulators, social movement activists, and people affected by illness seek to understand, regulate, and intervene in relationships between the environment and human health? Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Shostak

THA 138a The Business of Show Business
[ ca ]
Provides students with an overview of the many different facets of what it takes to produce live theater in America today. With an emphasis on non-profit theater, students will learn about organizational structure, aesthetic and artistic goals, facilities management, budgeting and revenue streams, public relations/marketing/advertising and communication. From brainstorming to barnstorming, this course will give students the step-by-step process of delivering live, professional theater. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Walsh

WMGS 152a Women as Leaders in the Business Realm
[ ss ]
Considers why women and men start their professions with the same level of intelligence, education and commitment but relatively few women reach the top echelons of the business world. We will examine which women do reach the top, and why. Usually taught every second year.
Ms. Shavarini

Elective Courses in Business Administration

BUS 114a Managerial Accounting
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 6a. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 14a in prior years.
Introduction to the principles, concepts, and methods of managerial accounting, including internal reporting used in planning, control, and decision making. Learn how organizations use this information to measure and control resources used in producing goods and providing services. Usually offered every semester.
Mr. Keith and Ms. Weihs

BUS 130a Entrepreneurship and Innovation
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 10a. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 30a in prior years.
Explores why, when, and how to start a new business venture. Includes identifying opportunities, gaining access to resources, and assembling a team with key skills. Uses lectures, case discussions, and outside speakers to introduce issues in both theory and practice. Usually offered every semester.
Mr. Reed

BUS 135a Real Estate and Society
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 10a. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 35a in prior years.
Provides students with the fundamentals of real estate investment analysis and examines major trends and current issues: affordable housing; preservations, conservation, and environmentalism; green construction; new urbanism and smart growth; and the meltdown in the capital markets. Usually offered every semester.
Mr. Chazen and Mr. Harrity

BUS 137a Real Estate Finance
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 135a.
Examines real estate finance from the perspective of the users of capital (developers and property owners) and the sources of capital (lenders and equity investors). Also considers the role of the public sector in using tax payer funds to advance public purposes by offering various kinds of subsidies to developers, and evaluating the relative success of such programs. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Chazen

BUS 137aj Real Estate Finance
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 135a.
Examines real estate finance from the perspective of the users of capital (developers and property owners) and the sources of capital (lenders and equity investors). Also considers the role of the public sector in using tax payer funds to advance public purposes by offering various kinds of subsidies to developers, and evaluating the relative success of such programs. Offered as part of JBS program.
Mr. Chazen

BUS 138a Real Estate Development
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 135a.
Focuses on the real estate development process, including zoning and planning, permitting, site analysis and acquisition, design and construction, financing, leasing, and value enhancement. Also considers the role of the community and regulators in supporting or objecting to a real estate project; and, the role of the public sector in using tax payer funds to advance public purposes. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Chazen

BUS 138aj Real Estate Development
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 135a.
Focuses on the real estate development process, including zoning and planning, permitting, site analysis and acquisition, design and construction, financing, leasing, and value enhancement. Also considers the role of the community and regulators in supporting or objecting to a real estate project; and, the role of the public sector in using tax payer funds to advance public purposes. Offered as part of JBS program.
Mr. Chazen

BUS 153a Marketing Research
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 52a. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 53a in prior years.
Marketing research is critical to business success in today's information economy. We will learn quantitative marketing research models and techniques for analyzing consumer behavior and marketing information. Topics include marketing segmentation, targeted promotion strategies, brand positioning, new produce design, and customer profitability. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Wang

BUS 154a Branding Strategy
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 152a.
Examines strategies to build and sustain brands, from development of highly differentiated value propositions, through promotional, pricing and distribution strategies. A competitive, online team-based simulation exercise is used to enhance case studies and provide a competitive learning environment. Usually offered every third year.
Ms. Zimmerman

BUS 154aj Branding Strategy
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 152a.
Examines strategies to build and sustain brands, from development of highly differentiated value propositions, through promotional, pricing and distribution strategies. A competitive, online team-based simulation exercise is used to enhance case studies and provide a competitive learning environment. Offered as part of JBS program.
Ms. Zimmerman

BUS 155a Consumer Behavior
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 52a. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 55a in prior years.
Examines fundamental theories and concepts in consumer psychology. Learn about new findings to enhance understanding of how and why people choose, use and evaluate goods and services the way they do. This knowledge will come from lectures, readings, and discussions in class, but also from hands-on experiential learning through involvement in a semester-long group project. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Ebert

BUS 157a Marketing Communications
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 152a.
Explores the activities a company undertakes to educate, engage and prompt to action its various target consumer segments. Topics include advertising, promotions, event sponsorship, internet marketing, social media marketing, corporate blogs, word-of-mouth advertising, and marketing communications for social initiatives. Usually offered every third year.
Ms. Zimmerman

BUS 157aj Marketing Communications
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 152a.
Explores the activities a company undertakes to educate, engage and prompt to action its various target consumer segments. Topics include advertising, promotions, event sponsorship, internet marketing, social media marketing, corporate blogs, word-of-mouth advertising, and marketing communications for social initiatives. Offered as part of JBS program.
Ms. Zimmerman

BUS 170a Business in the Global Economy
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: BUS 10a. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 70a in prior years.
Modern firms frequently cross national borders to find new markets and resources. Their strategies are then shaped by the international economy and by the policies of national governments. Using case discussion, students explore why and how U.S., Japanese, and European firms operate outside their home countries. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Lopez

BUS 172a Operations Management
[ ss ]
Prerequisites: BUS 1b and BUS 10a.
Operations Management is the scientific study and optimization of the processes that organizations use to create the products/services purchased by their customers. Topics include process analysis, the impact of variability on process performance, quality management (lean production and six sigma), project management, inventory management, supply chain coordination, revenue management and operations strategy. Usually offered every semester.
Ms. Tucker

BUS 195a Field Projects in Business
[ ss ]
Provides students with the opportunity to apply their skills and knowledge to solving actual client problems, assessing client challenges and opportunities and generally adding value to the client's operations. The course culminates in a final client presentation before the semester ends. The instructor will serve as project manager for all projects. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Chazen and Ms. Zimmerman

BUS 195aj Field Projects in Business
[ ss ]
Provides students with the opportunity to apply their skills and knowledge to solving actual client problems, assessing client challenges and opportunities and generally adding value to the client's operations. The course culminates in a final client presentation before the semester ends. The instructor will serve as project manager for all projects. Offered as part of JBS program.
Mr. Chazen and Ms. Zimmerman

ECON 135a Industrial Organization
[ qr ss ]
Prerequisites: ECON 80a and ECON 83a or permission of the instructor.
Microeconomic analysis of firm behavior under alternative market structures and implications for market outcomes. Topics include strategic interaction, entry and exit, collusion, predation, price discrimination, product differentiation, vertical relations, imperfect information, advertising, and patents and innovation. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Graddy and Mr. Shiller

ECON 141b Economics of Innovation
[ ss ]
Prerequisites: ECON 80a and ECON 83a or permission of the instructor.
Studies the innovation and technological change as the central focus of modern economies. Topics include the sources of growth, economics of research and development, innovation, diffusion and technology transfer, appropriability, patents, information markets, productivity, institutional innovation, and global competitiveness. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Jefferson

ECON 161a International Finance
[ ss ]
Prerequisites: ECON 82b. Corequisite: ECON 184b or permission of the instructor.
Applications of international economic theory – regarding trade, the balance of payments, investments, and exchange rates – to the management of import/export firms and multinational corporations. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Mann

ECON 171a Financial Economics
[ ss ]
Prerequisites: ECON 80a and ECON 83a, or permission of the instructor.
An introduction to financial economics. Topics include the selection of assets, portfolio choice under uncertainty, equilibrium asset pricing models, the efficient markets hypothesis, futures, and options markets. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Hilscher and Mr. Tortorice

ECON 172b Money and Banking
[ ss ]
Prerequisites: ECON 82b and ECON 83a or permission of the instructor.
Examines the relationship of the financial system to real economic activity, focusing especially on banks and central banks. Topics include the monetary and payments systems; financial instruments and their pricing; the structure, management, and regulation of bank and nonbank financial intermediaries and the design and operations of central banks in a modern economy. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Redenius

Business: Independent Instructional Courses

BUS 89a Work in the Global Business Environment: Internship and Seminar
Does not meet the requirements for the major or minor in Business.
Normally students arrange an internship placement prior to registration and the internship is concurrent with the seminar. Students wishing to fulfill the internship component during the summer must obtain approval from the instructor prior to the internship and then enroll in the following fall (or spring) semester. The course will meet every other week and a structured journal documenting the internship experience is required as a basis for seminar participation. The course encourages students to pool experiences and lessons drawn from various business environments and to analyze and discuss them in the context of related readings. Usually offered every semester.
Mr. Suderow

BUS 98a Independent Study
Does not meet the requirements for the major or minor in Business.
Normally available for a student who has taken a course and wishes to pursue further reading or research in that field or study a subject not listed among the department course offerings. Usually offered every year.
Staff