Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

History and Organization

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences was formally established in 1953 when the university's Board of Trustees authorized graduate study in the departments of chemistry, music, psychology and Near Eastern and Judaic studies. The general direction of the Graduate School is vested in the Council of the Graduate School, composed of a faculty representative of each graduate program and four graduate student representatives.

The Council is chaired by the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences or his designee. The functions of the Graduate Council, exercised in consonance with university policy, are to determine requirements for admission; provide programs of study and examination; establish and maintain requirements for graduate degrees; make recommendations for degrees; make recommendations for new areas of graduate study; establish such regulations as may be considered necessary or expedient for governing the Graduate School; and exercise a general supervision over its affairs.

The Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences is the chief executive officer of the Graduate School.

Objectives

The underlying ideal of the Graduate School is to assemble a community of scholars, scientists and artists, in whose company the student-scholar pursues study, research, training and teaching. This objective is attained by individualizing programs of study, restricting the number of students accepted, maintaining continual contact between students and faculty and fostering the intellectual potential of each student.

The graduate programs are designed to educate broadly as well as train professionally, preparing graduates for successful careers in academia, government and the private and nonprofit sectors. Degrees are granted on the evidence of intellectual growth and development, rather than solely on the basis of formal course credits. Fulfillment of the minimum requirements cannot, therefore, be regarded as the sole requisite for degrees.

Graduate School

The Graduate School office is located on the second floor of Kutz Hall. All requests for information and application forms should be submitted through www.brandeis.edu/gsas/.

Admission

Only well-qualified applicants who have completed at least the normal four-year program leading to the bachelor's degree will be considered for admission to the Graduate School. Graduates of schools outside the United States and others who have completed the equivalent of a bachelor's degree program may apply, describing in detail the educational program they have completed.


Testing


Applicants should consult specific program requirements for testing information. Many programs require the GRE general test, and some may require the appropriate subject test. In the case where the GRE is required, it is highly recommended that the applicant take the exam prior to submitting an application. In the case of certain programs, the GMAT, Miller Analogy Test, SAT I, or the MCAT may be substituted for the GRE. Requirements may be found at www.brandeis.edu/gsas.

Applicants should take the GRE no later than six weeks prior to the program's deadline. GRE scores that are received after the appropriate deadline may not be considered. For more information, please consult the Education Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6155, www.gre.org.

Applicants whose native language is not English, regardless of the field of graduate study, are required to submit the official score of the Test of English as a Foreign Language. The minimum score for admission to the Graduate School is 600 (paper-based test), 250 (computer-based test), or 100 (Web-based test). Applications for admission to the test should be made to TOEFL, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6155, USA, www.toefl.org. International applicants may substitute the IELTS exam (International English Language Testing Exam) for the TOEFL. The minimum score for admission is 7.0. For more information, visit www.IELTS.org.


Applying to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences


Specific requirements for each graduate program are to be found under the appropriate headings in this Bulletin and at www.brandeis.edu/gsas. Each applicant should consult these requirements before filing an application. Except in unusual circumstances, a student may apply to only one graduate program.

Applicants are encouraged to apply online via www.brandeis.edu/gsas or they may download the application for admission from the GSAS website. The application for admission should be completed and returned to the GSAS by the specified deadline.

Some master's programs admit students in the spring. Consult www.brandeis.edu/gsas for details. Applications for admission for the spring term should be filed by Nov. 15. Ph.D. candidates are rarely admitted at midyear, but those who do gain admission are eligible for financial aid. Master's degree candidates may be admitted and are eligible for financial aid.

All accepted applicants must arrange to forward official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work; unofficial transcripts are used for admission review purposes. In addition, they must submit letters of recommendation, preferably from professors with whom they have studied in their proposed area of study. Applicants who have engaged in graduate study elsewhere should request at least one of the recommendations from a professor with whom they have done graduate work.

Many programs also require the submission of samples of work as well as the materials described above. Applicants should consult www.brandeis.edu/gsas for details.

All applications must be accompanied by the application fee. No application will be processed until this fee is paid.

Applying Electronically (preferred method)
A $75 application fee is required of all candidates that apply online. Applicants may pay via credit card at the time of application submission or may mail a check or money order, made payable to Brandeis University, to the address below. Applications will not be reviewed by the graduate admission committee until the fee has been received and processed.

Applying via Hard-Copy/Paper Application
A $100 application fee is required of all applicants that apply via hard-copy or paper application. Applicants must mail a check or money order, made payable to Brandeis University, to the address below. Applications will not be reviewed by the graduate admission committee until the full fee of $100 has been received and processed.

Application Fee Waivers
The following populations are eligible for a fee waiver via the online application: current Brandeis undergraduate and graduate students; Brandeis alumni; full-time, benefits-eligible Brandeis employees; McNair Scholars; alumni of the Institute for the Recruitment of Teachers; Fulbright Scholars; Peace Corp volunteers; AmeriCorps volunteers; Summer Institute for Literacy and Cultural Studies at Wheaton College participants; SACNAS members; ABRCMS members; City Year alumni, alumni from Brandeis consortium institutions (Tufts, Boston College, Boston University, and Wellesley College, and DAAD scholars. All other applicants must submit an application fee. Fee waivers based on financial hardship will be granted on a case-by-case basis.


Admission Procedure


All applicants are considered on a competitive basis. The number of students admitted each year in each program is limited so that the Graduate School may operate effectively under its distinctive principles of individualized study and apprenticeship. Consequently, admission may sometimes be denied to qualified persons.

Meeting the minimum standards of admission merely qualifies the applicant for a place in the group from which final selections will be made. Selections are based on the applicant's ability to do graduate work of high quality, as shown by the distinction of his or her previous record, particularly in the proposed area of study; the letters of recommendation submitted in support of the application; and his or her presumed adaptability to the particular graduate programs offered by Brandeis.

In addition, knowledge of foreign languages, relevant practical experience in the field, samples of work, the results of the GRE and indications of character are considered.

Each application for admission with all supporting records is first examined by the appropriate program committee. The committee recommends to the Associate Dean for Enrollment of Graduate School of Arts and Sciences which applicants should be selected for admission and financial aid. The Associate Dean for Enrollment reviews all applications in the light of the program's recommendations.


Acceptance


A student who has been accepted for admission to the Graduate School will be notified by a letter specifying the date by which he or she must accept the offer of admission and awards, if any. A matriculation fee of $300 must be filed by each master's degree or postbaccalaureate program applicant upon notification of acceptance. This fee reserves a place in the class and is credited toward the first semester tuition bill.

If the student fails to enroll or withdraws his or her application, the matriculation fee is not refunded. If a student selected for admission indicates that he or she does not intend to accept the offer or fails to reply by the date specified, the admission offer becomes void and another applicant may be accepted.

Brandeis subscribes to the "Resolution Regarding Scholars, Fellows, Trainees, and Graduate Assistants" of the Council of Graduate Schools in the United States. The resolution states:

Acceptance of an offer of financial support (such as a graduate scholarship, fellowship, traineeship, or assistantship) for the next academic year by a prospective or enrolled graduate student completes an agreement that both student and graduate school expect to honor. In that context, the conditions affecting such offers and their acceptance must be defined carefully and understood by all parties. Students are under no obligation to respond to offers of financial support prior to April 15; earlier deadlines for acceptance of such offers violate the intent of this Resolution. In those instances in which a student accepts an offer before April 15, and subsequently desires to withdraw that acceptance, the student may submit in writing a resignation of the appointment at any time through April 15. However, an acceptance given or left in force after April 15 commits the student not to accept another offer without first obtaining a written release from the institution to which a commitment has been made. Similarly, an offer by an institution after April 15 is conditional on presentation by the student of the written release from any previously accepted offer. It is further agreed by the institutions and organizations subscribing to the above Resolution that a copy of this Resolution should accompany every scholarship, fellowship, traineeship, and assistantship offer.

Students must provide the Graduate School office with an official, final transcript of their undergraduate record, and, if required by the graduate program, any graduate work in process at the time of acceptance. The Graduate School reserves the right to revoke admission of students who provided fradulent information on their admission application. In addition, students who are accepted are required to complete and return a medical questionnaire and a health insurance form. Registration is conditional upon receipt by University Health Services of these required forms. Additional information, including requirements to enroll, can be found at www.brandeis.edu/gsas/accepted.


Admission Deferrals and Reapplying to the Graduate School


If, after having been admitted, a student cannot attend, he or she should notify the Graduate School as soon as possible in writing:

1. Should a Ph.D. student wish to be admitted in a subsequent academic year, he or she must reapply in full.

2. Master's and postbaccalaureate students admitted into a program may apply for a maximum one-year deferral of their enrollment. Students should submit a request, in writing, to the Graduate School with a $300 tuition deposit to hold their spot. Confirmation of the deferral will be provided in writing from the Graduate School.

3. Doctoral students are not normally eligible to defer their enrollment.

Applicants who have been denied admission may reapply in a later year, particularly if they have had further training that would strengthen their applications or if they can submit additional letters of recommendation.


Academic Standing


Admission is valid only for one academic year. Graduate programs review students' academic progress annually. Satisfactory academic progress in a program also involves maintaining the professional and departmental standards expected in a particular discipline or program. Academic insufficiency or failure to make suitable progress toward the degree may require withdrawal. Brandeis University reserves the right to deny admission or permission to register or require the withdrawal of any student at any time for any reason it considers sufficient, including but not limited to character and personal conduct.

A student's record is reviewed annually and recommendations for readmission are made by the graduate programs. However, programs may also review academic records at the end of each semester if a student is not making suitable academic progress. In these cases academic probation or withdrawal may result. Admission to the Graduate School does not imply that the successful applicant will be accepted as a candidate for a graduate degree. Superior performance at Brandeis is essential.


International Students

Graduates of international colleges and universities who have the equivalent of an American bachelor's degree and international students who have graduated from American universities may compete for admission and financial assistance at Brandeis, which is authorized under federal law to enroll nonimmigrant alien students.

Entrance Examinations
All applicants whose native language is not English must submit the official score of the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Thorough competence in English is required for study at Brandeis. Applicants should consult specific programs for additional test requirements. For information concerning the administration of the TOEFL, write to the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6155, www.toefl.org. Applicants may substitute IELTS test results for the TOEFL. Applicants may also take the IELTS exam (International English Language Testing Exam). The minimum score for admission is 7.0. For more information, visit www.IELTS.org.

Diagnostic Language Proficiency Test
If outlined as a requirement in your admission decision letter, international graduate students must take a diagnostic language proficiency test upon arrival to campus. This diagnostic test aims to identify weaknesses in one's academic English language skills that may interfere with course work, teaching, and research at Brandeis. After taking this diagnostic test, students will receive the results, which are strictly informative and will not affect status as an admitted graduate student, but may lead to required enrollment in English Language Program (ELP) classes.

English Language Program (ELP) Classes
If outlined as a requirement in your admission decision letter, international graduate students must enroll in one-credit 200-level ELP courses during their first and second semesters of graduate study at Brandeis. Normally, two courses, oral skills and written skills, are offered in the fall and spring semesters (classes are listed in the University Bulletin). These ELP courses focus on English for Academic Purposes, integrated with graduate study skills needed at a major research university. Students receive credit/no credit, where credit is granted for satisfactory work and no credit is granted for unsatisfactory work. Credit is awarded if all requirements are met at an acceptable level and the student attends at least 90% of the class meetings.

Financial Aid
Financial aid in the form of scholarships and fellowships is available to outstanding Ph.D. students. Tuition grants are also available on the basis of need and merit to master's degree students. However, the total assistance offered usually covers only a portion of the student's expenses. Hence master's degree students, when applying for admission, must indicate a means of financial support.

Employment
The regulations of the United States Department of Homeland Security limit strictly the amount of paid work that a student from abroad may do. Additional information regarding employment regulations is provided to students by the International Students and Scholars Office.

Requirements for the Degree

The following general requirements apply to the awarding of graduate degrees in all areas of study. For specific program requirements students should consult the appropriate section of this Bulletin. Requirements for postbaccalaureate certificate programs are listed in the relevant program sections of this Bulletin.


Master of Arts and Master of Science


In order to qualify for a master's degree, the student must complete a minimum of one year's residency at Brandeis, ordinarily computed as eight term courses of approved study. Some programs require a two-year residency. Please consult the appropriate program for detailed information.

Programs offering master's degrees may require that the candidate demonstrate a reading knowledge of at least one foreign language and pass satisfactorily a general or qualifying examination which, at the program's discretion, may be in one or more parts and may be written, oral or both.

Beginning in the fall of 2008, students entering graduate programs with a master's thesis requirement must electronically deposit their thesis to the Brandeis Institutional Repository. The master's thesis requirement will not be considered fulfilled and the thesis will not be published through the University Archives, until the Certification of Master's Thesis Acceptance form is submitted to the Graduate School. The signed and completed form must reach the Graduate School at least one day prior to submitting the thesis online, and at latest it must be turned in by the deadline specified on the academic calendar. Note that all of the committee members must sign this form in addition to the main thesis advisor and graduate chair.

The master's degree must be earned within four years from the inception of full-time graduate study at Brandeis.


Master of Fine Arts


In order to qualify for the degree of Master of Fine Arts in music, the candidate must complete a two-year residency at Brandeis, ordinarily computed as 12 term courses at the graduate level, and must meet the specific requirements for the degree as set forth under "Music, Requirements for the Master of Fine Arts Degree," in a later section of this Bulletin. Two copies of the thesis or composition must be submitted to the program chair in final form by the date specified in the current academic calendar.

In order to qualify for the degree of Master of Fine Arts in theater arts, the candidate must complete a three-year residency in acting, and meet the specific requirements for the degree as outlined under "Theater Arts, Requirements for the Master of Fine Arts Degree," in a later section of this Bulletin.

The Master of Fine Arts degree must be earned within five years from the inception of full-time graduate study at Brandeis.


Doctor of Philosophy


In order to qualify for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, a student must ordinarily complete a minimum of four years of graduate study, including three full years of residence and a fourth year devoted to the preparation of a doctoral dissertation. Under certain conditions, credit for advanced standing will be granted for work taken in residence in graduate schools of other universities. Each program reserves the right to require prospective candidates for the degree to perform work in excess of its minimum standards to assure thorough mastery of the area.

Prospective candidates may be required to demonstrate proficiency in at least one foreign language. In all areas of study, the student must satisfactorily pass a general or qualifying examination which at the program's discretion, may be in one or more parts and may be written, oral or both. In addition, all prospective candidates must write a doctoral dissertation and defend it in a final oral examination.

Each student will have the opportunity to develop skills as a teacher through close supervision of progressive pedagogic experiences by assisting or teaching one or more courses, as appropriate. Participation in ongoing discipline-specific, as well as skill-specific training through department- and school-wide seminars during a student's teaching apprenticeship in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, is expected.

To be eligible for the Ph.D. degree, the student must (1) complete all course, residence and teaching requirements, (2) pass all language and qualifying examinations, (3) have written and successfully defended the doctoral dissertation and (4) be otherwise in good standing.

Students entering Brandeis with no previous graduate work must earn the doctorate within eight years from the inception of study. Students who are granted credit for a year of graduate work completed elsewhere must earn the degree within seven years from the inception of their study at Brandeis.

Students who have passed the terminal point for the degree must apply to the Graduate School for an extension no later than the final semester prior to the expiration of their time to graduate. Petitions for extensions will be sent to eligible students during the spring semester. These completed petitions must be returned to the Graduate School by the date specified on the petition. Students no longer eligible for additional extensions will receive a letter stating that they must finish their degree by the close of the summer term.


Language Requirements


There is no university requirement for foreign language competency at either the master's or doctoral level.

Each program determines which languages are acceptable as satisfying its foreign language requirement. Some programs may not require foreign language competency, while others may set requirements that will vary within the subfields offered by those programs. In programs where languages are required, students are expected to satisfy the requirement as soon as possible.

For specific requirements of each program, consult the program listing in this Bulletin.


Joint Degrees


Interdisciplinary in design, the joint M.A. degree in women's and gender studies and a discipline aims to give M.A. and Ph.D. students a solid grounding in their discipline-specific program while offering them the tools with which to incorporate women's and gender studies into their areas of research.

This joint master's option, which may be pursued as a terminal degree or along the way to the Ph.D., is available in several programs that are listed in the "Women's and Gender Studies" section of the catalog. Consult the relevant sections of this Bulletin regarding the joint Ph.D. degree programs in NEJS and sociology, and sociology and social policy.

Students who are interested in designing a joint Ph.D. degree in two doctoral programs within the university may do so by petitioning the graduate school with their proposed program of study early in their graduate career. The admissions committees for both programs must approve the petition. It is understood that the student must satisfy all the requirements of both programs and defend one dissertation before a defense committee comprised of faculty from both programs. Students should consult the dean of the graduate school for more specific information about applying for a joint doctoral degree.


Degrees in Passing


Students enrolled in a Ph.D. program are allowed to apply for a master's degree within that program if they have satisfied all the requirements for the particular master's degree. Students are limited to only one master's degree in passing. A thesis may be required for the master’s in passing. Students should check with their department for requirements. Students may not apply for a master's degree in passing if they already hold a master's degree from the university, unless there is no overlap (double counting) in the terms used to fulfill the residency requirements for the two degrees.


Application for Graduate Degrees


Candidates for graduate degrees must file an application with the University Registrar per the specified dates in the academic calendar in the year in which the degree is to be awarded. Upon written recommendation from a candidate's program or committee that the application be approved, the record will be reviewed by the Graduate Council, which recommends the student to the university's Board of Trustees for the award of the degree or certificate.

In case of failure or withdrawal from candidacy in any year, the student must reapply by filing a new application in a later year.


Dissertation and Final Oral Examination


When a student is ready to write the doctoral dissertation, the chair of the student's program will appoint a dissertation reading committee of no fewer than three faculty members. Two of the committee members must come from the student's own department; one must be tenured; and one must come from another department or from outside the university. An emeritus faculty member at Brandeis may serve as one of the committee members from the student’s own department or, if this faculty member is emeritus in another department, the faculty member may serve as the outside reader. Both situations are subject to the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Should an inside reader, already committed to a dissertation reading committee, leave Brandeis for an appointment at another institution, this faculty member may be given a courtesy appointment in the department at Brandeis so that he or she may continue to serve on the committee as an advisor. However, this faculty member with a courtesy appointment cannot serve as the dissertation chair as the chair must be a current member of the faculty in the student’s department. The student's principal advisor will serve as the chair of this committee, which will guide the research and preparation of the dissertation.

The student must provide each reader with a copy of the dissertation, along with an abstract of no more than 350 words, for approval. The style and format of the dissertation is determined by each program.

The dissertation, when approved by the readers as eligible for a defense, must be deposited in the program office, where it will be available for inspection by all interested members of the faculty for at least two weeks prior to the final oral examination.

The dissertation reading committee, with the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and the chair of the student's program, will appoint a dissertation examining committee to preside over the student's final oral examination and will notify the student of the time and place of the final oral examination at least two weeks prior to the scheduled date of the examination. Students must also turn in their Dissertation Examining Committee Form to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at least two weeks prior to the scheduled defense.

The program and the Graduate School office will publish the time and place of the candidate's final oral examination of the doctoral dissertation. The defense must be on the premises of the university; normally all members of the defense committee must be present, but in special cases (with approval of the Dean of GSAS) a video conference is possible. A conference call, however, is not acceptable.

The final oral examination is open to any member of the faculty engaged in graduate instruction and invited faculty members from other institutions. A student must be registered and enrolled in the term(s) in which the dissertation is defended and submitted to the Graduate School office.

The dissertation examining committee, approved by the program chair and the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, must comprise a minimum of three faculty members. At least one must be a tenured member of the Brandeis faculty; at least two must be faculty members holding an appointment in that program's home department; at least one must either be a faculty member outside the student's program or an expert in the student's field of study from another institution. Normally, all members of the committee must hold a Ph.D. degree, although the program chair, with the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, may waive the requirement when a potential committee member has demonstrated a capacity to do research or be helpful in supervising a dissertation.

The examination may be restricted to a defense of the dissertation or may cover the whole field of the dissertation. The candidate will be notified by his or her program of responsibility for coverage prior to the examination.

A report, signed by the dissertation examining committee, certifying the candidate's successful performance at the final oral examination, will be submitted to the Office of the University Registrar.

If the dissertation examining committee requires "major revisions" (involving significant matters of substance), the revisions must be reviewed and accepted by the entire committee, not just the dissertation supervisor. If these revisions are not made within six months of the dissertation defense, there must be a re-defense of the dissertation.

If the dissertation examining committee requires "minor revisions" (e.g., stylistic changes, correction of typographical errors and re-formatting), the revisions may be reviewed and approved by the dissertation supervisors alone. If these revisions are not made within three months of the dissertation defense, the dissertation is automatically reclassified as one requiring "major revisions" and subject to its six-month deadline (i.e., if after an additional three months the dissertation has not been successfully deposited, there must be a re-defense).

Deposit and Publication of Dissertation


No later than the dates specified for dissertation deposit in the current academic calendar for February, May and August degrees, the candidate must electronically deposit one copy of the finished dissertation in a state suitable for digital scanning. The dissertation must have the signed approval of the dissertation supervisor and readers and must comply with the publishing and formatting guidelines outlined by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, which may be different from department guidelines. Submission of the dissertation to, and acceptance by, the Graduate School constitutes the completion of degree requirements.

Bibliographic citations and abstracts will be published in Dissertation Abstracts International, online, CD-ROM and microform. Bibliographic information concerning these documents will also be made available through the UMI Dissertation Abstracts Database and to a worldwide network of online information providers including OCLC and Dialog®. The Brandeis Libraries make dissertations available to students and scholars for research purposes.

Detailed instructions for submitting dissertations are available from the Graduate School office or GSAS Web site under Resources for Current Students. See also the statement in this Bulletin, under "Fees and Expenses," on the final doctoral fee.

Academic Regulations


Registration


Every resident, post-resident, extended master's and continuation student must register at the beginning of each term, whether attending regular courses of study, carrying on research or independent reading, writing a thesis or dissertation or utilizing any academic service or facility of the university.


Program of Study


Before enrolling, the student should plan a program of study in consultation with the chair or graduate adviser of the program.

Graduate students may not register for an undergraduate course (numbered below 100) for degree or postbaccalaureate (except in premedical studies) credit unless they complete a special petition available in the Office of the University Registrar, which requires the signatures of the instructor of that course and their program chair or graduate adviser.

Credit will not be given for undergraduate courses taken to make up deficiencies in the student's preparation for a program of graduate studies. Ordinarily a student may not receive credit toward completion of degree or residence requirements for courses undertaken to aid in the completion of language requirements. Students wishing to drop a full-year course at midyear must complete a special petition available in the Office of the University Registrar, which requires the signatures of the instructor of the course and the chair of their program.

At the end of the registration period (see "Academic Calendar" for specific date), all course enrollments are considered to be final.


Auditing Courses


The privilege of auditing courses without fee is extended to all regularly enrolled, full-time graduate students except special students. Special students may audit courses by paying for them at the same rate as those taken for credit. No courses may be audited without the permission of the instructor and the student's program chair. Auditors may not take examinations or expect evaluation from the instructor. No credit is given for an audited course.

The option of auditing courses is not available during the summer term.


Change of Courses


Students are allowed to drop courses after the end of the registration period. To do so, an add/drop form is obtained from the registrar's Web site, the necessary signatures are obtained, and the form is returned to the Office of the University Registrar. Courses must be dropped no later than the published deadline in the academic calendar.


Absence from Examinations


Students who are absent from a midyear or final examination without an accepted excuse will receive a failing grade for that examination. No students may be excused from such examination unless for emergency or medical reasons, nor may they be excused if they were able to notify the instructor in advance and failed to do so.

Cases involving absence are referred to the chair of the program who will decide whether a make-up examination shall be allowed and will notify the Office of the University Registrar of the decision. The examination must be taken no later than the make-up examination period at the beginning of the next semester.


Grades and Course Standards


Graduate students are expected to maintain records of distinction in all courses. Letter grades will be used in all courses in which grading is possible. In readings or research courses, if a letter grade cannot be given at the end of each term or academic year, credit (CR) or no credit (NC) may be used.

NC and any letter grade below B- are unsatisfactory grades in the Graduate School. A course in which the student receives an unsatisfactory grade will not be counted toward graduate credit. Postbaccalaureate students must have at least a B- average to be eligible for the certificate.

Programs may review academic records at the end of each semester if a student is not making suitable academic progress. In these cases, academic probation or withdrawal may result.

Final grades are available to students through the registration system upon posting by the University Registrar after the end of each semester.


Incompletes


A graduate student who has not completed the work (exams, papers, etc.) for any course may receive an EI (incomplete) or a failing grade at the discretion of the course instructor. A student who receives an EI must satisfactorily complete the work of the course in which the incomplete was given in order to receive credit for the course and a letter grade. All work for an incomplete must be submitted in the following term, no later than the date published in the academic calendar for the term.

An EI that is not resolved by the deadline in the academic calendar will automatically become a permanent incomplete (recorded as "I" on the transcript).

In exceptional circumstances, an instructor may request an extension of the deadline from the University Registrar.


Final Exams


A detailed final examination schedule of all final examinations administered by the Office of the University Registrar is published each semester around the mid-term period.

Final examinations administered by the Office of the University Registrar must be given during the scheduled final examination period and may not be given prior to the scheduled time.

Students and faculty should confirm the date and time of final examinations, once the detailed schedule is published, prior to making any travel arrangements.


Excused Absences from Final Exams


Graduate students who are unable to take their final examinations for legitimate reasons and wish to request a make-up exam must obtain advance authorization from the Dean of the Graduate School of Arts & Sciences. If approved, an excused absence form will be provided for the student to obtain the instructor’s approval and signature. Make-up exams may be scheduled with the instructor’s agreement for either the conflict resolution exam block, or the make-up exam period in the following semester. Arrangements cannot be made to take a final exam prior to the scheduled exam time. Students who have three exams in a row may, with permission of the instructor, reschedule one exam either during the conflict resolution or the make-up exam period in the following semester. If a student is absent without excuse from a final examination and does not obtain authorization for a make-up examination, the student will be given a grade of zero on the exam. The instructor will be asked to supply a grade for the course. If the instructor fails to do so on or before the institutional deadline, the registrar will enter a failing grade on the student's record.


Credit for Work Done Elsewhere


Graduate level courses taken prior to matriculation at Brandeis or while on a Leave of Absence and pursing an approved course of study maybe be applied to reduce the residence requirement for programs with a 2-year or longer residency.

The Master of Arts or Master of Science degrees with less than a 2-year residence requirement do not accept transfer credit to reduce the residence requirement, although a program may accept work taken elsewhere in partial fulfillment of specific course requirements for the degree. In that case, additional courses are designated to replace courses from which the student has been exempted.

The postbaccalaureate programs do not accept transfer credit.

For the Master of Fine Arts and for Master's degree programs that have a two-year residence requirement, a maximum of one term of residence credit for graduate-level courses may be transferred toward fulfillment of the residence requirement.

Students in Ph.D. programs may file an application to have graduate-level courses counted toward fulfillment of residence requirements at Brandeis. A maximum of one year of residence credit may be granted.

Applicants for transfer credit will not necessarily be granted the credit requested. Each program reserves the right to require of any student work in excess of its minimum standards to assure thorough mastery of the area of study. In all cases, courses being transferred must carry a grade of B or better and must have been earned at an appropriately accredited institution.

After completing one term of residence at a full-time rate or the equivalent at a part-time rate, students eligible to apply for transfer credit may do so. The External Transfer Credit Form are available on the Office of the University Registrar's website in the 'Forms' section. This form should be submitted to the student's program for approval and then submitted the Office of the University Registrar.


Graduate Cross-Registration


A full-time graduate student at Brandeis may enroll in one graduate course each term at Boston College, Boston University, Tufts University or the Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Information on courses for cross-registration at each of the host institutions is available at the graduate school office of each institution.

A student at Brandeis who wishes to enroll in a graduate course at one of the host institutions should obtain a registration permit from the Office of the University Registrar and should present this permit to the office of the registrar of the host institution. The student should consult with the instructor in the particular course and should expect to satisfy the prerequisites and requirements normally required for admission to the course, including adherence to the academic calendar of that course.

Any part-time graduate student in a degree program is allowed to participate in cross-registration. Students may only take one cross-registration course a semester, and are required to take at least one Brandeis course in addition to the cross-registered course. Students cannot exceed taking the equivalent of one cross-registration course per semester of residency.

Due to differences in academic calendars among the colleges in the consortium, it is not advisable for degree candidates to enroll in a cross-registered course in their final semester.


Academic Residence Requirements


Residence requirements for all full-time graduate degrees are computed by determining the amount of registration for credit and the tuition charges.


Master of Arts and Master of Science

The minimum residence requirement for most full-time master's degree students is one academic year in a full-time graduate credit program at full tuition. A few programs have a two-year residency requirement, so consult specific programs for this information. Programs with one or two year residency requirements may take an additional one or two semesters as an extended master's student. Transfer credit may not normally be applied to residence requirements for the M.A. and M.S. degrees.

There is no residence requirement for approved part-time master's programs.


Master of Fine Arts

The minimum residence requirement for all MFA students in music is four terms at a full-time rate, at the full tuition rate for each term. Residence may be reduced by a maximum of one term with approved transfer credit.

The minimum residence for students in acting is six terms at the full tuition rate for each term. Residence may be reduced by a maximum of one term with approved transfer credit.

There is no residence requirement for approved part-time MFA programs.


Doctor of Philosophy

The residence requirement for all students is three academic years in a full-time graduate credit program for each year, at the full tuition rate for each year, or the equivalent thereof in part-time study. A maximum of one year's approved transfer credit may be granted toward residence for the Ph.D. degree.


Full-Time Resident Students


A full-time student is one who devotes the entire time, during the course of the academic year, to a program of graduate work at Brandeis. Full-time students should consult with their advisers before taking on any outside commitments that might interfere with their academic progress.

A full-time program may include a combination of teaching and research assistance, other work leading to the fulfillment of degree requirements, such as preparation for qualifying, comprehensive and final examinations, supervised reading and research and Ph.D. dissertations, as well as regular course work.

A full-time resident student may take as many courses for credit in any term as are approved by the program chair, but no student may receive credit for, or be charged for, more than a full-time program in any term. Thus the minimum residence requirement for any degree may not be satisfied by an accelerated program of study or payment of more than the full-time tuition rate in any single academic year.


Part-Time Resident Students


A part-time student is one who devotes less than the entire time to a program of graduate work at Brandeis and is enrolled in fewer than 12 credits.

Students who wish to change their status from full-time to part-time residency, must file with the Graduate School office a request to change to part-time. Students are assumed to be full-time until such a request is made.

Many master's and postbaccalaureate programs allow students to apply as part-time students at the time of admission.


Post-Resident Ph.D. Students


A Ph.D. graduate student who has completed residence requirements and who needs to utilize the full range of academic services and university facilities while completing degree requirements is a post-resident student and should register for CONT 500a (Graduate Research), or the appropriate courses required to complete their programs.


Extended Master’s Students


A graduate student in a Master’s program (date of entry Fall 2012 or later) who has completed residence requirements and who needs to utilize the full range of academic services and university facilities while completing degree requirements is an Extended Master’s student and should register for the appropriate courses required to complete their program.

Students in this category may register for content courses and/or complete their thesis or research paper/project required for their degree.

Students who are completing a required thesis or paper/research project should register for CONT 200A (a 12-credit course placeholder/research course similar to CONT 500 for PhD students). This course enables the student to be full time, however, the student may register for this course for no more than two semesters. If the program requires a specific thesis or paper/research course the student will need to register for that course at some point during your career in order to receive a grade. Students who do not have a thesis or paper/research project may not register for CONT 200A but may register for content courses. Partial fee waivers may be available.

In addition, the following restrictions apply to this category:
1. Students registering for less than 6 credits in a semester will not be eligible for federal loans, or loan deferments.
2. Students registering for less than 7 credits in a semester will not be eligible for health insurance offered by the University.
3. Students who are completing incompletes only will need to be placed on a leave of absence (LOA) while they compete the incompletes; access to library will be arranged.


Continuation Students


A PhD student who has completed all degree requirements except the dissertation (and in some cases the teaching requirement) is eligible for continuation status. A student in this category enrolls on a full-time basis, and is eligible for university health insurance, borrowing privileges in the library, a computer account, use of gym facilities and purchase of a parking sticker. They are not normally eligible for fellowships or for leaves of absence, except for health reasons.

Continuation students must enroll before the end of the registration period each semester in CONT 500a (Graduate Research). For questions regarding these enrollments, please contact the Office of the University Registrar.

International students must enroll in CONT 500a (Graduate Research). Please contact the International Students and Scholars Office if there are special circumstances.


Graduate Summer Term


GSAS Graduate Summer Term exists for students in several categories.

1) Students listed below are required to register for summer and should complete registration through SAGE self-service by the date listed.
(a) Master's students in the Genetic Counseling program are required to participate in a clinical internship and should register by May 22 for BIOL 212A (2193) and 213a (2195). Registration for Graduate Summer Term does not count toward the residency requirement. The summer registration fee will be waived.
(b) Master's students in the Biotechnology program are required to participate in an internship and should register by May 22 for BIOT 212A (2221). Registration for Graduate Summer Term does not count toward the residency requirement. The summer registration fee will be waived.
(c) Master's students in the MAT in Education program should register by July 1 for the courses determined by your program. Full-time tuition will be charged.
(d) Master's students in the Hornstein Jewish Professional Leadership program should register by June 4 for courses in consultation with your program advisor. Half semester tuition will be charged.
(e) Students planning to enroll in a thesis, independent study, internship, project or lab rotation course during the summer term must complete registration by sending an email to Richard Cunnane in the Office of the University Registrar (rcunnane@brandeis.edu) indicating the course (include subject, course number, and instructor) you wish to enroll in. Please include your SAGE identification number and full name in the body of the email. A per course charge will apply.

2) PhD Students in the programs listed below are required to register for summer and will be enrolled by the Registrar's Office.
PhD students in the Life Sciences, Chemistry, Physics, or Computer Science program are required to be on campus or at a related lab for the full year while engaged in taking classes and/or doing research related to your field of study and will be enrolled in CONT 250B (2197). Registration for Graduate Summer Term does not count toward the residency requirement. The summer registration fee will be waived.

3) Students who intend to complete their degree program for an August degree must be enrolled for summer.
If you are defending your PhD dissertation or completing your Master's thesis by August 1, 2012 and/or depositing your dissertation or thesis by August 15 (deadline for August degree), you are required to register for CONT 250B (2197) and will be enrolled by the Registrar's office upon approval of your application for an August degree. The online application for an August degree must be submitted by June 15, 2013. The summer registration fee will be waived.
Note that students who complete all program requirements for an August degree prior to May 29 will not need to register for the summer term. However, you will need to notify the Graduate School that you wish to change your status for the summer to Degree Pending.

Brandeis Summer School
Students who are pursuing a Master's degree or Postbaccalaureate program may choose to enroll in graduate level courses in the Brandeis Summer School. Some GSAS departments may choose to designate selected courses offered through the Summer School for credit towards a GSAS Master’s degree or Post-Baccalaureate certificate. Students may review course listings in the Summer School Bulletin on the Summer School website http://www.brandeis.edu/summer. Students should register for Summer School courses by contacting Richard Cunnane (rcunnane@brandeis.edu) in the Office of the Registrar and NOT enroll in courses via the Summer School website.

Please note that GSAS students who register for summer courses in the Brandeis Summer School, the Heller School or the International Business School will be expected to pay the appropriate tuition to that school. GSAS tuition scholarships and grants do not apply.


Postbaccalaureate Students


A postbaccalaureate student is a student who is working in an approved course of study. Normal tuition charges apply; see the "Fees and Expenses" section for program-specific fees.

Postbaccalaureate programs may not be pursued concurrently with other formal degree work. Students who subsequently become candidates for graduate degrees are subject to the Graduate School's policy regarding transfer credit toward graduate degrees.


Special Students


Properly qualified applicants who wish to audit or to take courses without working for a degree may be admitted. Special students are normally not eligible for university loans, scholarships, fellowships or teaching or research assistantships.

Special students who later wish to change their status to that of part-time or full-time students working for a degree must apply for admission as resident students. They must also file a special petition if they wish credit to be accepted for any courses taken at Brandeis as special students. Credit for such course work may be granted in exceptional cases. Normally, no more than two courses taken for credit may be transferable if the student is admitted to either the master's or doctoral program.

Students must apply as a special student for each semester in which they wish to take a class. Details can be found at www.brandeis.edu/gsas.


Leave of Absence


Students may petition for a leave of absence using the form available on the GSAS website in the “forms” section. The petition must have the approval of the chair of the program and the Graduate School. Leaves of absence up to one year will normally be granted to students in good academic standing who present compelling personal reasons. Returns from leave may be subject to conditions established at the inception of the leave as indicated on the leave of absence petition form. Time spent on authorized leaves of absence will not be counted toward the maximum time permitted to complete degree requirements.

If, for any reason, a student must extend a leave of absence, he or she must request such an extension in writing before the leave of absence expires. Failure to do so will result in involuntary withdrawal from the Graduate School. Students who extend their leaves of absence beyond one year may lose departmental funding. Should a student wish to return, the student will be considered for funding as part of the department's entering cohort of students.


Withdrawal


A student who wishes to withdraw voluntarily from the Graduate School during a semester must do so by completing the change of status form and having it approved by to the program chair and the Graduate School on or before the last day of instruction in the term. Failure to notify the university in writing of a withdrawal may subject the student to loss of eligibility for refunds in accordance with the refund schedule outlined in the "Fees and Expenses" section. Permission to withdraw voluntarily will not be granted if the student has not discharged all financial obligations to the university or has not made financial arrangements satisfactory to the bursar.

Students who are obliged to register and fail to do so by the appropriate deadline or who fail to pay their bill will be administratively withdrawn. They may be readmitted (see below) for study in a subsequent term, but not for the term in which they were withdrawn for failure to register. Belatedly fulfilling financial obligations will not negate the effects of administrative withdrawal.


Readmission


A student who has not been enrolled in the Graduate School for more than one year and who did not obtain a leave of absence must file an application for readmission. The student's graduate program will determine in each case whether a student should be readmitted. If the program's requirements have changed during the student's absence or the student is not deemed current in his or her field of study, the program may require the student to repeat or supplement previous academic requirements, including foreign language or qualifying exams. When a student is reinstated, he or she will be informed of current status regarding credits and time to degree.

Fees and Expenses

Payment of tuition and other fees is due on August 9, 2013, for the fall semester and January 3, 2014, for the spring semester. A student who has not paid such fees by the day of registration will be refused the privilege of registration. A late fee will be assessed to all student accounts with outstanding balances after the stated due date. The amount of the late fee will be $100, or 2 percent of the outstanding balance, whichever is greater.

The monthly payment plan allows the year's charges to be paid in 10 equal monthly installments. Tuition Management Systems has contracted with Brandeis to administer the monthly payment plan. The application and a nonrefundable handling fee of $70 must be returned to TMS by July 19, 2013. For any applications returned by July 19, 2013, the payment plan electronic withdrawals will begin on August 1, 2013.

Contact the Office of Student Financial Services for additional information.

A student who defaults in the payment of indebtedness to the university shall be subject to suspension, dismissal and refusal of a transfer of credits or issuance of an official transcript. In addition, the university may refer the debt to an outside collection agency. The student is responsible for costs associated with the collection of the debt.

Such indebtedness includes, but is not limited to, an overdue balance owed to the university or the delinquency of a borrower in repaying a loan administered by the student loan office and the inability of that office to collect such a loan because the borrower has discharged the indebtedness through bankruptcy proceedings. If the student is a degree or certificate candidate, his or her name will be stricken from the rolls.

A student who has been suspended or dismissed for nonpayment of indebtedness to the university may not be reinstated until such indebtedness is paid in full.

Application Fee: $75 (online application), $100 (paper application)

Payable by all applicants for admission at the time the application for admission is submitted. It is not refundable. Checks and money orders should be made payable to Brandeis. No application for admission will be processed until this fee is paid. There is a one-time fee waiver for Brandeis students and alumni.

Matriculation Deposit: $300

Payable by a master's degree or postbaccalauerate applicant upon notification of acceptance. This fee reserves a place in the class and is credited toward the first semester tuition bill. If a student fails to enroll or withdraws his or her application, the matriculation deposit is forfeited.

Tuition and Fees

The fees for tuition in the Graduate School for 2013-14 are as follows:

Full-time resident students: $44,100 per year, or $22,050 per term.

Post-resident students: $2,756 per year.

Extended Master's students: $5,512 per semester.

Continuation fee: $1,378 per year.

Postbaccalaureate studio art students: $18,500 per year.

Master of Arts in Teaching students: $7,125 per term.

Master of Science, genetic counseling and biotechnology students: $33,074 per year.

Postbaccalaureate program in premedical studies students: $8,000 per term.

Special students, postbaccalaureate students in mathematics, and part-time resident students: $5,512 per course, per term or $1,378.00 per credit, per term.

In view of the constantly increasing costs of education, students may expect one or more tuition increases during their academic careers.

Postbaccalaureate Program Fees

Medical school application processing fee: $100, one-time fee payable on entrance.

Graduate Activity fee: $80.

Orientation Fee: $44

A one-time fee payable by students entering for the first time.

Final Doctoral Fee: $235

This fee covers all costs for the year in which the Ph.D. degree will be conferred, including the costs for the full publishing services for the dissertation; publication of the abstract of the dissertation in Dissertation Abstracts; issuance of a Library of Congress number, appropriate library cards and deposit of the dissertation in digital format at the Library of Congress; three xerographic softbound copies (for the author, department and library); and a microfiche for the Brandeis library. The final doctoral fee also covers the cost of the diploma.

Note: All candidates for the Ph.D. degree must pay the $235 final doctoral fee at the Office of Student Financial Services before they file their application for degree with the Office of the University Registrar.

Returned Check Fee: $25

A bank service fee will be charged to a student's account if a payment or a check negotiated through Brandeis is returned by the bank for any reason.

Transcript Fee: 

Current and former students should request official transcripts of their records from the Office of the University Registrar. At this time, students can order official transcripts of their academic work without charge. A charge is currently being implemented and information will be available in the Office of the University Registrar at the time that a transcript fee is instituted. Official transcripts will be issued only to those students whose university financial records are in order.

Student Health Services Fee: $726 (optional)

Entitles the full-time graduate student to use of Health Services.

Student Health Insurance Plan (single coverage): $1,903

All three-quarter or full-time students are required by state law to show certification of health insurance. Students without insurance of their own must purchase the Student Health Insurance Plan through the university. The fee is payable prior to registration and no portion is refundable. Student insurance is optional for special students. Additional insurance options, including family coverage, are described in A Guide to University Health Services, which is available from the Office of Health Services.

Parking Fee: $60-$250 per year

Payable annually at fall registration for the privilege of parking an automobile on campus. Fee varies with assigned parking area.

Monthly Payment Plan Fee: $70 (full year), $50 (one semester)

Late Fee: $100, or 2 percent of outstanding balance, whichever is greater


Refunds


The only fee that may be refundable, in part, is the tuition fee. No refund of the tuition fee will be made because of illness, absence or dismissal during the academic year. A student who is withdrawing must notify the Graduate School in writing; refunds will be based on the date of notification and calculated in accordance with the following:

1. Tuition

Withdrawal

Before the opening day of instruction: 100 percent of the term's tuition.

On or before the second Friday following the opening day of instruction: 75 percent of the term's tuition.

On or before the fifth Friday following the opening day of instruction: 50 percent of the term's tuition.

After the fifth Friday following the opening day of instruction: no refund.

Requests for refunds should be addressed to the bursar's office.

2. Scholarship

In the case of a scholarship student who withdraws, the student's account will be credited with the same proportion of the term scholarship as charged for tuition: 75 percent if the student leaves on or before the second Friday, 50 percent on or before the fifth Friday and no refund thereafter.

3. Federal Loans

In compliance with federal law, special refund arrangements apply to students receiving aid under Title IV. Contact the Graduate School financial aid officer for additional information.

Refund Policy for Dropped Courses

A student who drops courses on the per-course tuition charge basis is allowed a refund following this schedule:

1. Full semester-long courses

Before the opening day of instruction through the last day of the registration period (see the Academic Calendar): 100 percent of the dropped course's tuition fee.

On or before the fifth Friday following the opening day of instruction: 50 percent of the dropped course's tuition fee.

After the fifth Friday following the opening day of instruction: no refund.

2. Module courses

On or before the second Friday of module instruction (see the academic calendar): 100 percent of the dropped course's tuition fee.

After the second Friday of module instruction: no refund.


Housing


Ten-month living expenses in the Waltham area for a single individual on an economical budget are estimated to range from $9,000-$18,486. Very limited housing is available in the university's graduate residence halls. The costfor on-campus housing range from approximately $3,973-$5,182 per semester for a single person. Graduate housing includes kitchen facilities, but students may also purchase university meal plans.


Title IV Cancellations


If you have been awarded a student loan (Federal Stafford or Grad PLUS) you have a right to cancel all or a portion of your loan or loan disbursement. To do so, please submit a written request to: The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Brandeis University, Mailstop 031, 415 South St, Waltham, MA 02453-2728.

A request for loan cancellation or adjustment must be made before the end of the academic year or prior to leaving school, whichever comes first, and must state which loan(s) and what amount(s) you wish to cancel. Cancellation of your awarded student loan(s) will most likely create a balance due on your account. This balance would be due and payable upon receipt of the statement.

Financial Assistance

Fellowships and Scholarships


Students receiving financial aid from Brandeis, whether in the form of a fellowship or scholarship, are required to maintain a superior level of academic progress.

A fellowship is an academic award of honor to outstanding students to help them in furthering advanced study, research and training in teaching. A fellowship recipient must pay tuition fees unless the award includes a scholarship in an amount covering tuition.

A scholarship is an award on grounds of scholarly ability that will be used exclusively for remission of tuition fees. Full scholarships and partial scholarships are available. Scholarship students are liable for all but tuition charges.

All awards are granted and accepted with the understanding that they may be revoked at any time for undesirable conduct or poor academic standing.

Ordinarily, no student may hold a fellowship or scholarship for more than two years of study for the master's degree, more than three years of study for the MFA degree or more than five years of study for the Ph.D. degree. Priority in making awards is given to full-time students.

A student's tuition scholarship, fellowship and/or stipend are contingent on continued enrollment, as well as the conditions set out annually in this Bulletin, including, but not limited to, satisfactory academic progress. Changes in student status, such as leaves of absence, withdrawal, change of degree program, graduation or similar circumstances, will normally result in the cessation of university stipends and fellowships effective as of the date of any such change in status.

All students contemplating outside employment that would require a significant portion of their time should discuss their intentions with their program adviser.


Research and Course Assistantships


Research and course assistantships are available in several programs. Application should be made to the chair of the graduate program.


Dean's Fellowship


Brandeis established the Dean's Fellowship in 1995. The fellowship was created to encourage students from groups whose underrepresentation in the nation's Ph.D. population has been severe and long-standing to pursue doctoral studies in the humanities, social sciences and creative arts at the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Brandeis. The Dean's Fellowship provides five years of funding with a nine-month stipend, assuming satisfactory academic progress.

Factors considered in eligibility include financial need, first-generation status and/or membership in a traditionally underrepresented group. In order to qualify for the Dean's Fellowship, applicants must be nominated by one of the following programs: American history, anthropology, comparative history, English, music, Near Eastern and Judaic studies, psychology, politics or sociology.

Students who wish to be considered for the Dean's Fellowship should express their interest in the statement of purpose included with their application.


Need-Based Scholarships


A limited number of need-based scholarships may be available for master's degree candidates and postbaccalaureate who are enrolled at least half-time. Students may apply for need-based scholarships by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) or the International Student Application for Aid.


Loans


Federal Direct Stafford Loans are available to U.S. citizens and permanent residents who are enrolled at least half-time in a degree program and who demonstrate need by filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid.

Only the Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan is available to graduate students. (Please note that the Federal Direct Subsidized Stafford Loan is no longer available to graduate students.) Applicants must file the FAFSA to qualify for this loan. Graduate students may borrow up to a maximum of $20,500 per year in unsubsidized Direct Loan funds. Dependent postbaccalaureate program students may borrow up to $5,500 per year and independent postbaccalaureate students may borrow up to $12,500 per year. The maximum aggregate borrowing limit for the program (including undergraduate borrowing) is $138,500, with no more than $65,500 in subsidized loan funds.

The interest rate on the Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan is a fixed rate of 5.41 percent and the origination fee is 1% for loans first disbursed before July 1, 2013 and 1.051% for loans first disbursed on or after July 1, 2013.

Repayment of a Stafford Loan begins six months after the borrower ceases to be enrolled at least half-time. The standard repayment period is 10 years. (Please go to www.studentloans.gov for information about alternate repayment plans.) Students are required to pay the interest on the unsubsidized Stafford Loan during the in-school period, or have it capitalized and added to the loan balance.

The terms for the above loan programs are subject to federal legislation, regulations and other guidance, and may change. Additional current information is available from the Graduate School.

Students wishing to apply for loans should contact the Graduate School for application materials.

The Graduate PLUS Loan is a federal loan that allows graduate students to borrow up to their total cost of education less any financial aid received. The student must pass an independent credit review. The PLUS Loan has an origination fee of 4.0 percent for loans first disbursed on or before July 1, 2013 and 4.204 percent for loans first disbursed on or after July 1, 2013. The interest rate is a fixed rate of 6.41 percent. Go to www.studentloans.gov to apply for this loan.


Satisfactory Academic Progress


Federal regulations require that a student receiving federal assistance make satisfactory academic progress in accordance with standards set by the university. The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences delegates the responsibility to monitor academic progress to the individual graduate programs. Admission to the Graduate School is valid for one academic year. Graduate programs review students' academic progress and make recommendations for readmission annually. Any student who is readmitted for the following year is considered to be making satisfactory academic progress and is eligible for financial aid from federal sources.

Students who enter the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences must earn the doctorate within eight years, the Master of Arts within four years, the Master of Fine Arts within five years and must complete their postbaccalaureate program within two years from the inception of study exclusive of leaves of absence (pro-rated for part-time study). Students who have passed the terminal point for the degree may apply to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences for an extension and, if approved, may be eligible for additional federal financial aid.