Courses

Please see the Registrar's Schedule of Classes for schedule information.

All students need a consent code to enroll in Spanish Language Courses (HISP 10-108).

Spring 2019 Courses

Language Courses

Toggle
HISP 10A Beginning Spanish

(1) M,W,Th,F 9:00–9:50, Sewick

Prerequisite: Consent code required (please see instructions above).

For students who have had no previous study of Spanish. An introduction to the Spanish language and culture, this course focuses on the acquisition of effective communication skills in Spanish and cultural awareness. Students will actively speak, write, listen and read in the target language. A variety of media and texts relating to authentic familiar topics will be used. Active participation is essential.

Toggle
HISP 20B Continuing Spanish

(2) M,T,W,Th 10:00–10:50, González Ros

(3) M,T,W,Th 11:00–11:50, González Ros

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 10a or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

For students with some previous study of Spanish. Students will continue the development of all language skills (speaking, reading, listening, writing and culture) using a variety of media and texts relating to authentic familiar topics. The focus of the class is to communicate effectively and to learn more about the culture of the Spanish-speaking world. Active participation is essential.

Toggle
HISP 32A Intermediate Spanish: Conversation

(1) M,W,Th,F 9:00–9:50, Chilelli
(2) M,W,Th,F 10:00–10:50, Mederos
(3) M,T,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Burstin
(4) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50; F 12:30–1:20, Chilelli
(5) M,T,W,Th 9:00–9:50, Burstin

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 20b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

This course focuses on the development of oral expression and conversational skills in the context of a continuing development of linguistic competence in Spanish.

Toggle
HISP 34A Intermediate Spanish: Topics in Hispanic Culture

(1) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50; F 12:30–1:20, Mederos

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 20b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

Topics or themes from Hispanic cultures are the context for continuing development of linguistic competence in Spanish.

Toggle
HISP 104B Peoples, Ideas, and Language of the Hispanic World

image of poster for HISP 104(1) M,W,Th 10:00–10:50, Burstin
(2) M,W,Th 11:00–11:50, Turpin

Prerequisite: HISP 32 or 34. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

Participants will expand their skills in Spanish while deepening their understanding of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on aspects of the history and ideas that shape today’s Spanish-speaking world, from its peninsular origins to the realities of Spanish-speakers in the Americas.

Toggle
HISP 105A Spanish Conversation and Grammar

(1) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, Sewick
(2) M,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Sewick

Prerequisite: HISP 104b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

Students learn to communicate effectively in Spanish through class discussions, oral and written exercises, presentations, literary and cultural readings, film, and explorations of the mass media. Emphasis on improvement of oral and written fluency, and the continued acquisition of vocabulary and grammar structures.

Toggle
HISP 106B Spanish for Written Communication through Contemporary Culture

(1) M,W,Th 10:00–10:50, Turpin
(2) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, Turpin

Prerequisite: HISP 105a or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above). This is a Writing Intensive course.

Focuses on written communication and the improvement of writing skills including the development of ideas, outlining, and editing. Literary selections are used to help students to continue focusing on language—vocabulary, structures, and elements of texts; they serve as topics for class discussion and writing as well as an introduction to the principles of literary analysis.

Toggle
HISP 108A Spanish for Heritage Speakers

image of poster for HISP 108(1) M,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Mederos

Consent code required (please see instructions above).

This is a Writing Intensive course.

Designed specifically for students who grew up speaking Spanish and who would like to enhance existing language skills while developing higher levels of academic proficiency. Assignments are geared toward developing skills in reading, writing, and critical thinking about U.S. Latin@s and the Spanish-speaking world. Students may use this course to fulfill the foreign language requirement.

Toggle
HISP 111B Introduction to Latin American Literature and Culture

image of poster for HISP 111(1) M,W 2:00–3:20, Rosenberg

Prerequisite: HISP 106b, or HISP 108a, or permission of instructor. Non-Western and Comparative Studies Requirement.

Examines a broad variety of Latin American texts of different genres (essays, poems, short stories, and chronicles) and from different time periods from the European conquest to modern and contemporary Latin America, placed within the context of global trends. We will discuss key cultural problems (indigenous cultures, hybridity and mestizaje; coloniality and emancipation; modernity, nationalisms, Pan-Americanism, globalization, etc.). Topics such as gender and race will be discussed throughout the semester, tracing continuities and ruptures throughout Latin American intellectual history. 

Toggle
HISP 152B Monsters and Creatures in Latin American and Latinx Culture

image of poster for HISP 152(1) T,Th 2:00–3:20, Arellano

Non-Western and Comparative Studies Requirement.

Explores the role of the monstrous and the creaturely in Latin American and Latinx genre cinema, literary fiction, visual and performance art, and biomedia. We pay particular attention to the ways in which Latin American and Latinx monsters reflect and wrestle with systems of racial inequality, ethnic and sexual difference, and the rise of new technologies on the peripheries of global capitalism. Taught in English. 

Toggle
HISP 162B New Latin American Cinema: From Revolution to the Market

image of poster for HISP 162(1) M,W 5:00–6:20, Rosenberg

Prerequisite: HISP 109b, HISP 110a, or HISP 111b, or permission of the instructor. 

We will study films from two pivotal periods of film production, both of which were considered "new waves" of Latin American cinema, and acquired global circulation. On the one hand, the new cinemas of the 1960s and 1970s, which introduced formal experimentation to accompany radical political change, movements of revolutionary insurrection and/or postcolonial emancipation. On the other hand, the film boom of the 1990s and 2000s, in which we find aesthetic experimentation in contentious dialogue with new economies marked by neoliberal policies and market globalization. We will watch at least one film per week, often two; talk of film theory and techniques; and try to understand some global trends as they are portrayed in film. 

Toggle
HISP 170A 1 Topics in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature
image of poster for HISP 170. text reads:HISP 170A Topics in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature: Clarín’s La Regenta as a Sociocultural Map of Nineteenth-Century Spain. Professor James Mandrell. T,Th 5:00pm–6:30pm. Prerequisite: HISP 109b or HISP 111b, or permission of the instructor. Taught in Spanish. Leopoldo Alas’s La Regenta is considered to be the most important nineteenth-century Spanish novel and, after Cervantes’ Don Quijote, the second-best Spanish novel ever. It has everything: love, sex, adultery, gun fights, sin, organized religion and religious politics, commerce and conversion, a plethora of detail that portrays the sociocultural and intellectual landscape of late nineteenth-century Spain. Our reading will take into account the story that Alas tells and the way that he tells it as well as the ways that the novel allows us to engage with different theories of literature and culture. In addition, we’ll discuss Fernando Méndez-Leite’s televisual version of La Regenta as it adapts and departs from the written text.(1) T,Th 5:00–6:20, Mandrell

Prerequisite: HISP 109b or HISP 111b, or permission of the instructor. Taught in Spanish.

Topic spring 2019: Clarín’s La Regenta as a Sociocultural Map of Nineteenth-Century Spain

Leopoldo Alas’s La Regenta is considered to be the most important nineteenth-century Spanish novel and, after Cervantes’ Don Quijote, the second-best Spanish novel ever.  It has everything: love, sex, adultery, gun fights, sin, organized religion and religious politics, commerce and conversion, a plethora of detail that portrays the sociocultural and intellectual landscape of late nineteenth-century Spain.  Our reading will take into account the story that Alas tells and the way that he tells it as well as the ways that the novel allows us to engage with different theories of literature and culture.  In addition, we’ll discuss Fernando Méndez-Leite’s televisual version of La Regenta as it adapts and departs from the written text.