Did You Know?

The founding clubs of the Intercultural Center were ¡Ahora!, BBSO, Caribbean ConneXion, Chinese Students and Scholars Association, Korean Student Association, South Asia Club (aka South Asian Students Association), Sepherad, AZAAD and the Brandeis Asian American Student Association (BAASA).

History

1960s
The Intercultural Center's roots spread back to the 1960s when the Afro-American Association requested that Morton May Hall (the current Shapiro Admissions building) be transformed into an African Cultural Center. These conversations continued through the 1980s.

1988
A report by the Advisory Committee on Students of Color made several recommendations to improve academic and social life for students of color, one being the creation of an Intercultural Center.

1989
The basement of Morton May Hall was transformed into the Intercultural Library.

1990s
A shift emerged creating a cultural center with a library.

1992
On March 4, 1992, the Intercultural Center celebrated its opening on the campus of Brandeis University. The theme for the celebration that day was "A Vision Realized," intended to recognize the many long hours of hard work put forth by an organized group of student leaders known as the Push Committee. The Push Committee drafted and re-drafted the proposal for the use of the Swig Student Center as an Intercultural Center.

The founding clubs of the Intercultural Center were ¡Ahora!, BBSO, Caribbean ConneXion, Chinese Students and Scholars Association, Korean Student Association, South Asia Club (aka South Asian Students Association), Sepherad, AZAAD and the Brandeis Asian American Student Association (BAASA).

1997
Student leaders, the director, and the center's Advisory Board agreed that the books in the Intercultural Library should be integrated into the main library in 1997.

2002
The Intercultural Center celebrated its 10th anniversary.

2007
The Intercultural Center celebrated its 15th anniversary.

2012
The Intercultural Center celebrated its 20th anniversary.

2013
Let's write our own history.