Download the Handbook

 Download the 2013-14 Rights and Responsibilities student code (PDF) 

 Download the 2012-13 Rights and Responsibilities student code (PDF) 

 Download the 2011-12 Rights and Responsibilities student code (PDF)

 Download the 2010-11 Rights and Responsibilities student code (PDF)

 Download the 2009-10 Rights and Responsibilities student code (PDF)

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the difference between a conduct administrator and the Student Conduct Board determining a sanction?

How long will it take for my case to be finished?

Am I entitled to an adviser during my hearing?

What is the difference between a warning and residence probation?

Does a conduct sanction automatically go on my transcript?

Will being sanctioned affect my chances of getting into law school or medical school?

I am a student, and I believe someone has violated a university policy. Can I refer them?

What else does your office do other than adjudicate conduct cases?

What is the purpose of a peer judgment-based system of student conduct?

What is an interim suspension/restriction?

What about off-campus incidents?


Q: What is the difference between a conduct administrator and the Student Conduct Board determining a sanction?

A: The officers and Board members are given the same training on appropriate sanctioning, and the sanction is always delivered as a recommendation to the DSRCS Director or Associate Dean for approval.  Some students who accept responsibility for a violation would prefer that that the Board hear a case because they want to present their case to their peers.

Q: How long will it take for my case to be finished?

A: Normally, no longer than two weeks, unless there are extenuating circumstances.  The duration of a Special Examiner's Process is different, and is described in detail, segment-by-segment, in Rights and Responsibilities.

Q: Am I entitled to an Advisor during my hearing?

A: Yes, if your case goes before the Student Conduct Board, you are entitled to have an Advisor accompany you during the hearing.  The Advisor must be a current student, faculty member, or administrator from the Brandeis Community.

Q: What is the difference between a Disciplinary Warning and Residence Probation?

A: A Disciplinary Warning informs the student that they now have a conduct record on file in the Department of Student Rights and Community Standards and that further inappropriate behavior may lead to more severe sanctioning.  Residence Probation applies to a specific period of time and informs a student that they are no longer in good standing in their living unit.  Further violations may result in removal from the residence halls.

Q: Does a conduct sanction automatically go on my academic transcript?

A: No, there are only a few instances in which a sanction appears on an academic transcript.  If you are required to withdraw from the University due to academic dishonesty or an egregious behavioral issue, you might receive a "Required to Withdraw" notation on your transcript.  If you are sanctioned to receive a failing grade in a class for an academic integrity issue, the failing grade will appear, but your transcript will not state that you received the failing grade as the result of a Student Conduct Process sanction.

Q: Will being sanctioned affect my chances of getting into law school or medical school?

A: That depends.  Most law schools and medical schools ask that you provide conduct involvement information on their applications.  Oftentimes the Department of Student Rights and Community Standards is asked for conduct information about applicants.  Usually an individual's conduct history is an issue only when they have been involved in a very serious incidents or numerous lesser incidents. 

Q: I am a student (undergraduate or graduate student), and I believe someone has violated a University policy.  Can I refer them?

A: Yes, any member of the Brandeis Community (faculty, staff, student) can refer another student.  In fact, any person anywhere on Earth may file a good-faith referral against a Brandeis student.  A person considering such a referral should understand that their in-person participation may be required if there is a hearing.

Q: What else does your office do other than adjudicate conduct cases?

A: The Department of Student Rights and Community Standards is involved in ongoing education and programing efforts regarding our community standards and conflict resolution procedures.  Please give us a call at (781) 736-5070.

Q: What is the purpose of a peer judgment-based system of student conduct?

A: A peer judgment-based system is of vital importance when talking about student conduct at Brandeis.  Students are expected to be involved in the Brandeis Community, and thus it is paramount that students have a voice in this process.  At the heart of this process is the Student Conduct Board, a panel composed of students, staff, and faculty that hears cases of alleged student misconduct.

Q:  What is Emergency Suspension/University Action?

A:   Students who are accused of a very serious infraction may be restricted or suspended from the residence halls, the University or certain buildings or areas pending the review or final disposition of their case or referral.  The decision to suspend/restrict on an interim basis is made by the Dean or the Dean's designee and communicated to the student.  The student has an opportunity to meet with the Dean/designee to discuss and review any interim action (see Section 22 of Rights and Responsibilities).

Q: What about off-campus incidents?

A: The University expects students to conduct themselves in accordance with the expectations set forth in Rights and Responsibilities as long as they are enrolled at Brandeis.  This means the University may take action if it learns of violations that take place off campus, including at home or when studying abroad (see Section 22 of Rights and Responsibilities).