Course Offerings


Session:

Area of Interest:

High school students should view these regular college courses also available to High School Students.

ANTH 5a - Human Origins

4 credit hours
Instructor: Javier Urcid
Requirements Fulfilled: ss
M, T, Th 11:00 AM - 1:20 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
This course studies major evolutionary transformations of humanity from early hominins to fully modern Homo sapiens, and offers an introduction the theoretical frameworks and biological processes that explain these transformations. Fossils and archaeological evidence serve to highlight the origins of bipedalism, and symbolic practices including art and language, and the shift from foraging to agricultural and pastoral societies.
Sage class number: 2385
Course Tuition: $2,320 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

ANTH 70a - Business, Culture and Society

4 credit hours
Instructor: Mrinalini Tankha
Requirements Fulfilled: ss
M, T, Th 1:30 - 3:50 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
In a diverse and rapidly changing global marketplace, it is crucial to understand local traditions, customs and cultural preferences. In this course, we adopt anthropological approaches to understand their impact on business practices, products, services, clients and ideas.
Sage class number: 2340
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

ANTH 116a - Human Osteology

4 credit hours
Instructor: Javier Urcid
Requirements Fulfilled: sn, ss
M, T, Th 8:30 - 10:50 AM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
This is an experiential learning course. This course also counts toward the HSSP Major or Minor.
In this course we will study skeletal anatomy and the application of forensic techniques to archaeological problems. Hands-on laboratory sessions focus on methods of estimating age at the time of death, determining sex, assessing skeletal variability, detecting instances of bone remodeling, and identifying cultural and natural modifications to bony tissue. Case studies will be used to exemplify bioarchaeological approaches.
Sage class number: 2072
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

ANTH 127a - Medicine, Body, and Culture

4 credit hours
Instructor: Anna Jaysane-Darr
Requirements Fulfilled: nw, ss, wi
M, T, Th 1:30 - 3:50 PM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
In this course we will examine the main areas of inquiry in medical anthropology, including medicine as a sociocultural construct, political and economic dimensions of suffering and health, patients and healers in comparative medical systems, and the medical construction of men's and women's bodies. This course is available for Undergraduate Credit only in Summer 2014.
Sage class number: 2181
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

BIOL 51a - Biostatistics

4 credit hours
Instructor: Tynan Kelly
Requirements Fulfilled: sn
M, T, Th 1:30 - 3:50 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
Prerequisite: MATH 10a
This course is a basic introduction to the methods of statistics and the mathematical analysis applied to problems in the life sciences. Topics include statistical analysis of experimental data, mathematical description of chemical reactions, and mathematical models in neuroscience, population biology, and epidemiology.
Sage class number: 2074
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

BIOL 101a - Molecular Biotechnology

4 credit hours
Instructor: Jason Baade
Requirements Fulfilled: sn
M, T, Th 8:30 - 10:50 AM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
Prerequisites: BIOL 22a.
This course examines the molecular basis of DNA replication, RNA transcription, and the mechanisms involved in the translation of genes into proteins. We will focus on molecular biology techniques which include PCR, DNA sequencing and cloning, microarray analysis, Western blotting, and the applications of siRNA. In order to relate these techniques to real-world research applications we will use a combination of primary research literature review and hands-on laboratory training.
Sage class number: 2417
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable, once per summer $50 registration fee.

CHEM 11a-1 - General Chemistry I - Section 1 (Summer Ses. 1)

4 credit hours
Instructor: Claudia Novack
Requirements Fulfilled: qr, sn
M, T, Th, F 9:00 - 10:50 AM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
This course may not be taken for credit by students who have passed CHEM 10a or 15a in previous years. The corresponding lab is CHEM 18a-Section 1, Sage class number: 2131. The small summer class size will allow the instructor to set the pace of the course in accord with the needs of students who have had varying previous exposure to chemistry. Along with CHEM 11b, this course will cover the subject matter of a conventional full-year chemistry course, providing the student with an understanding of the principles and concepts underlying the molecular processes and macroscopic chemical changes of matter. Following an introduction to stoichiometry, a background of quantum theory and atomic structure will lead to an understanding of molecular bonding and structure, and states of matter and phase changes. The study of reaction energetics and kinetics will be followed by solution equilibria, electrochemistry and acid-base reactions. The course will conclude with applications to organic and inorganic chemistry. This course will provide students with the full range of chemical topics desired when only a single semester of chemistry is adequate for their needs.
Sage class number: 2129
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

CHEM 11a-2 - General Chemistry I - Section 2 (Summer Ses. 2)

4 credit hours
Instructor: Michael Vela
Requirements Fulfilled: qr, sn
M, T, Th, F 9:00 - 10:50 AM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
This course may not be taken for credit by students who have passed CHEM 10a or 15a in previous years. The corresponding lab is CHEM 18a - Section 2, Sage class number: 2132. The small summer class size will allow the instructor to set the pace of the course in accord with the needs of students who have had varying previous exposure to chemistry. This course will cover the subject matter of a conventional Fall semester chemistry course, providing the student with an understanding of the principles and concepts underlying the molecular processes and macroscopic chemical changes of matter. Following an introduction to stoichiometry, a background of quantum theory and atomic structure will lead to an understanding of molecular bonding and structure, and states of matter and phase changes. The study of reaction energetics and kinetics will be followed by solution equilibria, electrochemistry and acid-base reactions. The course will conclude with applications to organic and inorganic chemistry. This course will provide students with the full range of chemical topics desired when only a single semester of chemistry is adequate for their needs. PLEASE NOTE: This class will meet on Mondays from 9am-12noon to allow for an extra hour of instruction. Please plan your schedule accordingly.
Sage class number: 2130
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

CHEM 11b-1 - General Chemistry II - Section 1 (Summer Ses. 2)

4 credit hours
Instructor: Claudia Novack
Requirements Fulfilled: qr, sn
M, T, Th, F 9:00 - 10:50 AM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 11a or the equivalent. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have passed CHEM 10b or 15b in previous years. The corresponding lab is CHEM 18b-Section 1, Sage class number: 2077.
This course is an extension of material presented in CHEM 11a. When taken in conjunction with CHEM 11a and associated laboratory courses CHEM 18a and b, it meets the general, analytic, and inorganic chemistry requirements of medical and dental schools. This course covers basic chemical principles, with examples drawn from the chemistry of living systems as well as from environmental chemistry and materials science. Topics covered include chemical equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, kinetics, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, radioactivity and nuclear chemistry, and coordination chemistry. The combination of the two summer sessions covers the same material presented in CHEM 11a and CHEM 11b to all science majors during the academic year.
Sage class number: 2076
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

CHEM 18a-1 - General Chemistry Laboratory I - Section 1 (Summer Ses. 1)

2 credit hours
Instructor: Claudia Novack
Requirements Fulfilled:
M, Th 1:00 - 5:20 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
Corequisite: CHEM 11a-Section 1. Dropping CHEM 11a necessitates written permission from the lab instructor to continue with this course. May yield half-course credit toward rate of work and graduation. Two semester hour credits. This course may not be taken by students who have passed CHEM 19a in previous years.
The enrollment in this class is limited, allowing close supervision of each student's performance. Experiments are designed to illustrate the topics discussed in CHEM 11a, including atomic spectra, stoichiometry, gas laws, and chemical reactions. This course will include gravimetric, volumetric, and synthesis and spectrometric analysis of an inorganic complex. Techniques of measurement and the assessment of errors will be stressed.
Sage class number: 2077
Course Tuition: $1,616 plus a $100 laboratory materials course fee and a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

CHEM 18a-2 - General Chemistry Laboratory I - Section 2 (Summer Ses. 2)

2 credit hours
Instructor: Michael Vela
Requirements Fulfilled:
M, Th 1:00 - 5:20 PM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
Corequisite: CHEM 11a-Section 2. Dropping CHEM 11a necessitates written permission from the lab instructor to continue with this course. May yield half-course credit toward rate of work and graduation. Two semester hour credits. This course may not be taken by students who have passed CHEM 19a in previous years.
The enrollment in this class is limited, allowing close supervision of each student's performance. Experiments are designed to illustrate the topics discussed in CHEM 11a, including atomic spectra, stoichiometry, gas laws, and chemical reactions. This course will include gravimetric, volumetric, and synthesis and spectrometric analysis of an inorganic complex. Techniques of measurement and the assessment of errors will be stressed.
Sage class number: 2132
Course Tuition: $1,616 plus a $100 laboratory materials course fee and a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

CHEM 18b-1 - General Chemistry Laboratory II - Section 1 (Summer Ses. 2)

2 credit hours
Instructor: Claudia Novack
Requirements Fulfilled:
M, Th 1:00 - 5:20 PM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 18a and CHEM 10a or CHEM 11a. Corequisite: CHEM 11b. Dropping CHEM 11b necessitates written permission from the lab instructor to continue with this course. May yield half-course credit toward rate of work and graduation. Two semester hour credits. This course may not be taken by students who have passed CHEM 19b in previous years.
This course is a continuation of the CHEM 18a laboratory and complementary to CHEM 11b lectures. The experiments will complement the material and utilize the quantitative skills from CHEM 11b. This course will include qualitative and quantitative analysis using instrumental and wet chemistry techniques. Experiments will include colligative properties, kinetics, and equilibria involving acid-base, electron transfer and solubility reactions. Titration, cell potentials and spectrophotometry will be used to evaluate equilibrium parameters. An organic compound will also be synthesized and analyzed.
Sage class number: 2077
Course Tuition: $1,616 plus a $100 laboratory materials course fee and a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

CHEM 25a - Organic Chemistry, Lectures

4 credit hours
Instructor: Jason Pontrello
Requirements Fulfilled: sn
M, T, Th, F 9:00 - 10:50 AM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 10b, 11b, 15b or the equivalent. The corresponding lab for this course is CHEM 29a, Sage class number: 2080. This course meets the first half of the organic chemistry, biology, premedical, and pre-dental majors when taken in conjunction with the laboratory course CHEM 29a. It is also useful for individuals in the physical and life science fields who wish to gain a working knowledge of organic chemistry. The course will examine the important classes of organic compounds of chemical, biological, and medicinal interest. Attention is focused on the relationship between structure and reactivity. Current theoretical concepts of structure, bonding, and mechanism form a basis for the interpretation of the properties and interactions as well as the synthesis and transformation of a wide range of organic compounds.
Sage class number: 2078
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

CHEM 25b - Organic Chemistry, Lectures

4 credit hours
Instructor: Jason Pontrello
Requirements Fulfilled: sn
M, T, Th, F 9:00 - 10:50 AM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 25a or its equivalent. The corresponding lab for this course is CHEM 29b, Sage class number: 2081.
As a continuation of CHEM 25a, this course meets the second half of the organic chemistry requirement for chemistry, biology, premedical, and pre-dental majors when taken in conjunction with the laboratory course, CHEM 29b.
Sage class number: 2079
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

CHEM 29a - Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

2 credit hours
Instructor: Jason Pontrello
Requirements Fulfilled:
T, Th 1:00 - 5:20 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 18b or 19b or the equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 25a. Dropping CHEM 25a necessitates written permission from the lab instructor to continue with the lab. May yield half-course credit toward rate of work and graduation. Two semester hour credits. The laboratory affords practical experience in the purification, isolation, and analysis of organic compounds. Various techniques include extraction, distillation, chromatography, and crystallization.
Sage class number: 2080
Course Tuition: $1,616 plus a $100 laboratory materials course fee and a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee.

CHEM 29b - Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

2 credit hours
Instructor: Jason Pontrello
Requirements Fulfilled:
T, Th 1:00 - 5:20 PM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 29a or the equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 25b. Dropping CHEM 25b necessitates written permission from the lab instructor to continue with the lab. May yield half-course credit toward rate of work and graduation. Two semester hour credits.
A continuation of CHEM 29a. This course is designed to give experience in the important techniques of organic synthesis. It includes synthesis of typical organic compounds and characterization using analytic and instrumental procedures.
Sage class number: 2081
Course Tuition: $1,616 plus a $100 laboratory materials course fee and a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

COSI 11a - Programming in Java and C

4 credit hours
Instructor: Antonella DiLillo
Requirements Fulfilled: sn
M, T, Th 11:00 AM - 1:20 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
This is an experiential learning course. Open only to students with no previous programing background.
This course serves as a general introduction to structured programming and problem solving using C and Java in the context of the Internet. Students also learn GUI programming and advanced HTML authoring.
Sage class number: 2182
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

COSI 21a - Data Structures and the Fundamentals of Computing

4 credit hours
Instructor: Antonella DiLillo
Requirements Fulfilled: sn
M, T, Th 11:00 AM - 1:20 PM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
Prerequisite: COSI 11a or programming facility in C.

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of computation including: discrete structures (sets, relations, functions, sequences, graphs), the fundamental data structures and algorithms for sorting and searching (lists, queues, dequeues, heaps, hashing, binary trees, tries), and the analysis of algorithms (predicate logic, termination and correctness proofs, computational complexity).
Sage class number: 2183
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

ECON 10a - Introduction to Microeconomics

4 credit hours
Instructor: H. Michael Coiner
Requirements Fulfilled: qr, ss
M, T, Th 1:30 - 3:50 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
Intended for Economics majors and minors or students who intend to take more than one Economics course. May not be taken for credit by students who took ECON 2a in prior years.
This course introduces students to the field of microeconomics, which is the study of how individuals and firms make decisions and how these decisions interact.
Sage class number: 2082
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

ECON 20a - Introduction to Macroeconomics

4 credit hours
Instructor: Jeremy Kronick
Requirements Fulfilled: ss
M, T, Th 1:30 - 3:50 PM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
Prerequisite: Econ 2a with a B+ or higher or Econ 10a. May not be taken for credit by students after they have taken ECON 82b. May not be taken concurrently with ECON 82b.
This course introduces student to the field of macroeconomics. Macroeconomics is the study of the overall or aggregate economic performance of national economies.
Sage class number: 2083
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

ECON 28b - The Global Economy

4 credit hours
Instructor: Raffi Garcia
Requirements Fulfilled: ss
M, T, Th 11:00 AM - 1:20 PM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
Prerequisites: Econ 2a or Econ 10a and Econ 20a. May not be taken for credit by students who took ECON 8b in prior years.
This course applies the basic tools and models of economic analysis to a wide range of topics in micro-, macro-, and international economics.
Sage class number: 2084
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

ECON 80a - Microeconomic Theory

4 credit hours
Instructor: Lara Loewenstein
Requirements Fulfilled: ss
M, T, Th 6:30 - 8:50 PM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
Prerequisite: Econ 10a or Econ 28b (formerly Econ 8b). Students must earn C- or higher in MATH 10a, otherwise satisfy the math requirement, to enroll in this course. See "Special Notes Relating to Undergraduates" in the economics section of the Bulletin for more information.
This course serves as an analysis of the behavior of economic units within a market economy. Emphasis will be placed upon individuals' decisions as demanders of goods and suppliers of resources, and firms' decisions as suppliers of goods and demanders of resources under various market structures.

Please note: For ECON 80a, 82b, and 83a, Brandeis Students receiving less than a C- for any of these courses must retake the course and earn a C- or better before enrolling in any upper-level elective. Students receiving less than a C- in ECON 83a must retake the course and earn a C- or better before enrolling in an Econometrics course. Students must receive a C- or higher in Math 10a or the equivalent course prior to enrolling in any of these courses. If it is found that a student has not successfully completed this prerequisite at any time during the semester, the student will be dropped from the course.
Sage class number: 2085
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

ECON 82b - Macroeconomic Theory

4 credit hours
Instructor: Miao Ouyang
Requirements Fulfilled: ss
M, T, Th 11:00 AM - 1:20 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
Prerequisite: Econ 20a or Econ 28b (formerly Econ 8b). Students must earn C- or higher in MATH 10a, or otherwise satisfy the math requirement, to enroll in this course. See "Special Notes Relating to Undergraduates" in the economics section of the Bulletin for more information.
This course studies models of the determination of economic aggregates, such as national income, consumption, investment, government spending, exports, imports, and international capital flows, and economy-wide variables, such as the interest rate, the exchange rate, the price level and inflation, and the unemployment rate. The influence of fiscal and monetary policies on these aggregates and variables is also examined.

Please note: For ECON 80a, 82b, and 83a, Brandeis Students receiving less than a C- for any of these courses must retake the course and earn a C- or better before enrolling in any upper-level elective. Students receiving less than a C- in ECON 83a must retake the course and earn a C- or better before enrolling in an Econometrics course. Students must receive a C- or higher in Math 10a or the equivalent course prior to enrolling in any of these courses. If it is found that a student has not successfully completed this prerequisite at any time during the semester, the student will be dropped from the course.
Sage class number: 2086
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

ECON 83a - Statistics for Economic Analysis

4 credit hours
Instructor: Sarah Le Tang
Requirements Fulfilled: qr, ss
M, T, Th 6:30 - 8:50 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
Prerequisite: ECON 2a or 10a. Students must earn C- or higher in MATH 10a, or the equivalent, to enroll in this course. See "Special Notes Relating to Undergraduates" in the economics section of the Bulletin for more information.
This is a first course in statistical inference. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, normal and binomial distributions, sampling distributions, point and interval estimation, properties of estimators, hypothesis testing, regression, and analysis of variance.

Please note: For ECON 80a, 82b, and 83a, Brandeis Students receiving less than a C- for any of these courses must retake the course and earn a C- or better before enrolling in any upper-level elective. Students receiving less than a C- in ECON 83a must retake the course and earn a C- or better before enrolling in an Econometrics course. Students must receive a C- or higher in Math 10a or the equivalent course prior to enrolling in any of these courses. If it is found that a student has not successfully completed this prerequisite at any time during the semester, the student will be dropped from the course.
Sage class number: 2087
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

ECON 171a - Financial Economics

4 credit hours
Instructor: Abdullah Al Mahmud
Requirements Fulfilled: ss
M, T, Th 8:30 - 10:50 AM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
Prerequisites: ECON 80a and ECON 83a, or permission of the instructor. May not be taken for credit by students who have previously taken IEF 205a.
This course is an introduction to financial economics. Topics include the selection of assets, portfolio choice under uncertainty, equilibrium asset pricing models, the efficient markets hypothesis, futures, and options markets.  This course is available for Undergraduate Credit only in Summer 2014.
Sage class number: 2088
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

ENG 21a - Adolescent Literature

4 credit hours
Instructor: William Flesch
Requirements Fulfilled: hum
M, T, Th 8:30 - 10:50 AM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
Literature for adolescents can't afford any self-indulgences: its audience is too impatient. So it's a great place to see what's essential to storytelling. Authors may include Shelley, Twain, Salinger, Pullman, and Rowling, whom we'll use to test basic narrative theory.
Sage class number: 2089
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

ENG 33a - Shakespeare

4 credit hours
Instructor: William Flesch
Requirements Fulfilled: hum
M, T, Th 8:30 - 10:50 AM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
This course provides a survey of Shakespeare as a dramatist. Students will read between several plays, representing all periods of Shakespeare's dramatic career.
Sage class number: 2383
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

ENG 79a - Directed Writing: Beginning Screenwriting

4 credit hours
Instructor: Marc Weinberg
Requirements Fulfilled: hum, wi
M, T, Th 11:00 AM - 1:20 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
This course may not be repeated by students who have taken ENG 129b in previous years. Offered exclusively on a credit/no credit basis. This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of screenwriting: structure, plot, conflict, character, and dialog. Students read screenwriting theory, scripts, analyze files, and produce an outline and the first act of an original screenplay.
Sage class number: 2091
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

ENG 129a - Writing Workshop: Creative Nonfiction

4 credit hours
Instructor: Colin Channer
Requirements Fulfilled: hum, wi
M, T, Th 6:30 - 8:50 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
Offered exclusively on a credit/no credit basis.
Students will learn how to use a wide range of literary techniques to produce factual narratives drawn from their own perspectives and lives. Creative assignments and discussions will include the personal essay, the memoir essay and literary journalism.
Sage class number: 2092
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

ENG 147a - Film Noir

4 credit hours
Instructor: William Flesch
Requirements Fulfilled: hum
M, T, Th 11:00 AM - 1:20 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
A study of classics of the genre (The Killers, The Maltese Falcon, Touch of Evil) as well as more recent variations (Chinatown, Bladerunner). Readings include source fiction (Hemingway, Hammett) and essays in criticism and theory.
Sage class number: 2094
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

FA 3b - Introduction to Drawing II: Wet Media

4 credit hours
Instructor: Alfredo Gisholt
Requirements Fulfilled: ca
M, T, Th 6:30 - 8:50 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
This is a art course for beginners. This course may be repeated once for credit if offered by different instructors.
This art course is an introduction to the materials and methods of drawing. A topic based course, this section of FA 3b will offer basic drawing instruction through focus on a particular theme: drawing with the "wet media" of ink and watercolor. Students will work from still life, the figure and landscape, and will consider how pens and brushes can be used in expressive and inventive ways.
Sage class number: 2095
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a $40 Studio Art Fee and a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

FA 9a - Introduction to Digital Photography

4 credit hours
Instructor: Scott Wiener
Requirements Fulfilled: ca
M, T, Th 8:30 - 10:50 AM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
This is an experiential learning course. This course may be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor.
An introduction to the visual forms and concepts of the photographic image. A range of digital techniques is covered along with aspects of the history of photography. Students must provide their own digital camera. Field trips and image presentations supplement the studio aspect of the course.
Sage class number: 2096
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a $75 studio art fee and a nonrefundable, once per summer $50 registration fee.

FILM 110a - Film Production I

4 credit hours
Instructor: Marc Weinberg
Requirements Fulfilled: ca, ss
M, T, Th 1:30 - 3:50 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
This course is an introduction to the basic principles and techniques of fictional narrative motion picture production. Students will take part in teams and produce two short films. The films will emphasize dramatic development and creative storytelling through image composition, camera movement, editing, and sound.
Sage class number: 2097
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

HIST 56b - World History to 1960

4 credit hours
Instructor: Marlynn Miller
Requirements Fulfilled: nw, ss
Online, M, W 7:30 - 9:00 PM

Extended Summer Session: June 2 to August 8, 2014
Survey of world history from 1450 to 1960. Topics include development of worldwide networks of economic and cultural exchange; the rise of modern political and industrial systems; colonialism, imperialism, and resistance; transformation of religious/philosophical systems and constructions of race and gender; environmental change.

Please note: Taking an online class differs greatly from taking a face-to-face class on campus. In order to receive the consent code necessary to enroll in an on-line class, students must arrange a conversation with the Summer School Director, Gwenn Smaxwill (781-736-3424), to discuss the differences between online course and face-to-face courses. At the conclusion of that conversation, students will receive a "Permission number" that will allow them to enroll in the course using the detailed registration steps found here. The "Permission Nbr" is used in Step #7 of the registration process.

Before your online class begins, students will be required to complete a self-paced LATTE tutorial to online learning. A student must have a UNET account and must be enrolled to access this tutorial which includes an overview of LATTE, the Brandeis course management website, for new and visiting students and an introduction to BlackBoard Collaborate, the system Brandeis uses to conduct live, webcam-to-webcam, class meetings.
Sage class number: 2137
Course Tuition: $2,550 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

HISP 20b - Continuing Spanish

4 credit hours
Instructor: Mary Naielskier de Burstein
Requirements Fulfilled:
M, T, W, Th 8:50 - 11:30 AM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 10a or the equivalent. Students enrolling for the first time in a Hispanic Studies course at Brandeis must take the online placement exam (see below). Students must earn a C- or higher in this course in order to enroll in a 30-level Hispanic Studies course. For students with some previous study of Spanish. Continuing presentation of the basic grammar and vocabulary of the language within the context of Hispanic culture and practice of the four language skills. Special attention to reading and writing skills, as well as guided conversation.

If you are uncertain whether your previous language study has prepared you for this course level, you can take the University's Spanish Language Placement Exam. The exam is designed to be taken and graded by the student using this Spanish Placement Exam Answer Key.
Sage class number: 2098
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

HISP 32a - Intermediate Spanish: Conversation

4 credit hours
Instructor: Raysa Mederos
Requirements Fulfilled: fl
M, T, W, Th 8:50 - 11:30 AM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 20b or the equivalent. Brandeis students enrolling for the first time in a Hispanic Studies course must take the online placement exam (see below). Brandeis students must earn a C- or higher in this course in order to enroll in a 100-level Hispanic Studies course. This course focuses on the development of oral expression and conversational skills in the context of continuing development of linguistic competence in Spanish.

If you are uncertain whether your previous language study has prepared you for this course level, you can take the University's Spanish Language Placement Exam. The exam is designed to be taken and graded by the student using this Spanish Placement Exam Answer Key.
Sage class number: 2099
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

INT 92g - Summer Internship

1 credit hours
Instructor: Staff
Requirements Fulfilled:
Online TBA

Extended Summer Session: June 2 to August 8, 2014
Enrollment is limited. Credit or Non-Credit grading status only. This class is open to Brandeis Undergraduate and Visiting Undergraduate students who have attained a minimum of sophomore class standing and would like to earn one credit hour for their chosen summer internship.

INT 92g is an undergraduate 1-credit course offered in the summer that allows students to receive Brandeis credit for a summer internship through additional academic coursework. An appropriate summer internship must include site work with a minimum of 100 hours over the course of at least 5 weeks during the summer. Students must complete the required LATTE online academic requirements by the due date and arrange for their internship supervisor evaluation to be received by the instructor prior to the stated deadline in the syllabus. For international students, enrolling in INT 92g provides academic credit for an internship in their major area of study during the summer.

Students may earn one (1) hour of elective credit for each summer INT 92g internship completed. The credit may be applied as general credit toward graduation or may be applied toward fulfillment of major requirements with approval of the major department. The maximum number of Internship credit hours a student may receive towards their undergraduate requirements (including fall, spring, and summer internships) is eight (8) credits in total. Any internship obtained that would put over the credit limit cannot be earned for credit. No retroactive credit will be granted.

For more information, or for the steps on how to enroll, visit: http://www.brandeis.edu/summer/internships/int92g.html


Sage class number: 2138
Course Tuition: $400 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

MATH 8a - Introduction to Probability and Statistics

4 credit hours
Instructor: Stephen Hermes
Requirements Fulfilled: qr, sn
M, T, W, Th 11:00 AM - 12:50 PM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
This course will cover the following topics in mathematics: discrete probability spaces; random variables; expectation; variance; approximation by the normal curve; sample mean and variance; and confidence intervals. No calculus is required, but students are expected to be proficient in high school algebra and the graphing of functions.

If you are uncertain whether your previous mathematics study will prepare you for the courses you see listed here, please visit the Registrar's website at: Mathematics Calculus Placement Testing and scroll down to "Mathematics" for a copy of the University's Math placement exam. The exam is designed to be taken and graded by the student.
Sage class number: 2102
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

MATH 10a - Techniques of Calculus (a)

4 credit hours
Instructor: Cristobal Lemus
Requirements Fulfilled: sn
M, T, W, Th 9:00 - 10:50 AM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade of C- or higher in MATH 5a or placement by examination. Students may not take MATH 10a if they have received a satisfactory grade in MATH 10b or MATH 20a. MATH 10a is an introduction to differential (and some integral) calculus of one variable, with emphasis on techniques and applications. You can view a syllabus for this class here.

If you are uncertain whether your previous mathematics study will prepare you for the courses you see listed here, please visit the Registrar's website at: Mathematics Calculus Placement Testing and scroll down to "Mathematics" for a copy of the University's Math placement exam. The exam is designed to be taken and graded by the student.
Sage class number: 2103
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

MATH 10b - Techniques of Calculus (b)

4 credit hours
Instructor: Tue Ly
Requirements Fulfilled: sn
M, T, W, Th 9:00 - 10:50 AM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade of C- or higher in MATH 10a or placement by examination. Continuation of 10a. Students may not take MATH 10a and MATH 10b simultaneously. Students may not take MATH 10b if they have received a satisfactory grade in MATH 20a. This course introduces integral calculus of one variable with emphasis on techniques and applications. Topics include indefinite and definite integration, introductory differential equations, applications, such as finding areas and volumes, and techniques of integration, and sequences and series.

If you are uncertain whether your previous mathematics study will prepare you for the courses you see listed here, please visit the Registrar's website at: Mathematics Calculus Placement Testing and scroll down to "Mathematics" for a copy of the University's Math placement exam. The exam is designed to be taken and graded by the student.
Sage class number: 2104
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

MATH 15a - Applied Linear Algebra

4 credit hours
Instructor: Moses Kim
Requirements Fulfilled: sn
M, T, W, Th 11:00 AM - 12:50 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
Prerequisites: MATH 5a or placement by exam (see below), or any mathematics course numbered 10 or above. PLEASE NOTE: Students may take MATH 15a OR MATH 22a for credit, but not both. Students in MATH 15a will learn about matrices, determinants, linear equations, vector spaces, eigenvalues, quadratic forms, and linear programming. Emphasis will be placed on techniques and applications.

If you are uncertain whether your previous mathematics study will prepare you for the courses you see listed here, please visit the Registrar's website at: Mathematics Calculus Placement Testing and scroll down to "Mathematics" for a copy of the University's Math placement exam. The exam is designed to be taken and graded by the student.
Sage class number: 2105
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

MUS 1a - Introduction to Music

4 credit hours
Instructor: Elizabeth Perten
Requirements Fulfilled: ca
M, T, Th 6:30 - 8:50 PM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
This course is an introduction to Western art music. Through class discussion, readings, listening examples, and individual research, we will survey musical history from the Middle Ages through to today and analyze not only the development of musical form and style, but the socio-cultural contexts in which these works were produced. This course challenges students to question history and its production, both through the analysis of historical primary sources and our own textbook. Students will leave this class not only with significant knowledge of musical terms, stylistic periods, traits, and composers (from the traditional canon and others) of Western Classical music, but also an understanding of how music functions in culture and society and how that has shaped music's composition, production, and meaning over the past 1500 years. Though we will move relatively quickly to cover all historic eras, students will indeed learn and develop the tools with which they can continue their study of music in the future.
Sage class number: 2106
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

MUS 3b - Introduction to World Music

4 credit hours
Instructor: Joanna Fuchs
Requirements Fulfilled: ca, nw
M, T, Th 6:30 - 8:50 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
Open to all students. Required of all Cultural Studies track majors.
With the rise of globalization and digital media, access to various types of music has become increasingly easy. Each culture has music whether it is used for ceremonial or recreational purposes. Why do humans need music? What does music tells us about the people who play it and listen to it? How do the cultural values of a society relate to the aesthetics in the music?

This course seeks to explore some of the aforementioned questions. Throughout this five week course, we will experience music from Sub-Sahara and North Africa, the Middle East, India and China, Brazil, and parts of North America. Each region has its own unique sound and cultural connection to music. In Sub-Sahara Africa we will see the importance of polyrhythms and the significance music has on everyday life. In contrast to the main part of Africa, the Northern area is a blend of traditional Berber music with classical Arabic music. From North Africa we will make our way to the Middle East, as we examine the connection between religion and music, leading us to India. Out of all the music we will discuss, classical Indian music is one of the most complex musics found. Indian music is deeply rooted in ancient philosophies and a system of mathematics. The end result is an amazing sound. Finally, we will examine the folk music of America. Together, we will explore these cultures as we learn about different traditions. Also, we will discuss the impact globalization has had on these areas of the world and what are some of the positive and negative outcomes.
Sage class number: 2107
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

MUS 108a - Introduction to Music Production and Recording Technologies

4 credit hours
Instructor: Peter Lane
Requirements Fulfilled: ca
M, T, Th 1:30 - 3:50 PM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
Taking a creative, historical, and practical approach to the development of studio recording practices since 1950, this course will offer students the opportunity to work with the recording and mixing facilities at Brandeis to produce their own original music. While acquiring competency in popular music production and mixing within the Logic software environment, students will also learn the historical context the applied technologies (i.e. the development of microphones, outboard devices via Logic's emulators, changing trends in mixing and spacialization, etc.). The course will offer students the means to better realize their creative endeavors with the use of music technology, as well as broaden their familiarity with the multimedia applications that have become integrated into a wide range of creative fields. The course also provides fundamentals of acoustics, audio engineering, and digital sound. This course is available for Undergraduate Credit only in Summer 2014.
Sage class number: 2397
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

NEJS 185b - The Making of the Modern Middle East

4 credit hours
Instructor: Shahram Shadbash
Requirements Fulfilled: hum, nw, ss, wi
M, T, Th 8:30 - 10:50 AM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
NEJS 185b may not be repeated for credit by students who have taken NEJS 145b in previous years.
Students will discuss the processes that led to the emergence of the modern Middle East: disintegration of Islamic Ottoman society; European colonialism; reform and reaction; the rise of nationalism, formation of modern states, Arab-Israeli Conflict, Iranian Revolution and Arab Spring. This course is available for Undergraduate Credit only in Summer 2014.
Sage class number: 2108
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

NEJS 187a - Political Islam

4 credit hours
Instructor: Shahram Shadbash
Requirements Fulfilled: hum, nw, wi
M, T, Th 8:30 - 10:50 AM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
NEJS 187a may not be repeated for credit by students who have taken NEJS 148a in previous years.
This course traces the recent reemergence of Islam as a political force by examining its position in the contemporary Islamic world. The course will use Egypt, Libya, Algeria, Palestine, Afghanistan, Iraq and Iran as major test cases for assessing the success of political Islam. This course is available for Undergraduate Credit only in Summer 2014.
Sage class number: 2109
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

PHIL 1a - Introduction to Philosophy

4 credit hours
Instructor: Nicole Dular
Requirements Fulfilled: hum, wi
M, T, Th 11:00 AM - 1:20 PM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
This course presents the problems of philosophy, especially in the areas of metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and social and political philosophy. Texts include works of selected philosophers of various historical periods from antiquity to the present.
Sage class number: 2110
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

PHIL 6a - Introduction to Symbolic Logic

4 credit hours
Instructor: Matthias Jenny
Requirements Fulfilled: hum
M, T, Th 1:30 - 3:50 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
Symbolic logic provides concepts and formal techniques that elucidate deductive reasoning. This course covers sentence logic and predicate logic. Topics include truth-functional connectives, quantifiers, validity, truth, validity, and proof.

This course fulfills requirements for philosophy majors and non-majors. It is also of interest to any students interested in critical thinking and logic, for example, those planning to take the LSAT.
Sage class number: 2111
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

PHYS 10a - Introduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena I

4 credit hours
Instructor: Edward Martens
Requirements Fulfilled: qr, sn
M, T, W, Th 9:00 - 10:50 AM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
Prequisite or Corequisite: MATH 10a or equivalent. The corresponding lab for this course is PHYS 18a, Sage class number: 2115. This course will introduce students in the life sciences to those phenomena and concepts of physics basic to their professional work. It is designed to meet the first half of the physics requirement of medical and dental schools when taken in conjunction with the laboratory course, PHYS 18a. It does not require facility in differential and integral calculus, but does presuppose a working knowledge of algebra and some familiarity with trigonometry. The laws and concepts of mechanics and thermodynamics are the main topics of the course.
Sage class number: 2113
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

PHYS 10b - Introduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena II

4 credit hours
Instructor: Edward Martens
Requirements Fulfilled: qr, sn
M, T, W, Th 9:00 - 10:50 AM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
Prerequisite: PHYS 10a. The corresponding lab for this course is PHYS 18b, Sage class number: 2116. This course concludes the introduction of students in the life sciences to those phenomena and concepts of physics basic to their professional work. It is designed to meet the second half of the physics requirement of medical and dental schools when taken in conjunction with the laboratory course, PHYS 18b. PHYS 10b does not require facility in differential and integral calculus, but does presuppose a working knowledge of algebra and some familiarity with trigonometry. The main topics of the course are acoustics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics.
Sage class number: 2114
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

PHYS 18a - Introduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena I Laboratory

2 credit hours
Instructor: Staff
Requirements Fulfilled:
M, T, W, Th 11:15 AM - 12:35 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
Corequisitie: PHYS 10a. May yield half-course credit toward rate-of-work and graduation. This laboratory course consists of basic physics experiments designed to accompany PHYS 10a.
Sage class number: 2115
Course Tuition: $1,616 plus a $35 laboratory materials course fee and a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

PHYS 18b - Introduction to Physical Laws and Phenomena II Laboratory

2 credit hours
Instructor: Staff
Requirements Fulfilled:
M, T, W, Th 11:15 AM - 12:35 PM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
Corequisitie: PHYS 10b. May yield half-course credit toward rate-of-work and graduation. This laboratory course consists of basic physics experiments designed to accompany PHYS 10b.
Sage class number: 2116
Course Tuition: $1,616 plus a $35 laboratory materials course fee and a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

POL 167a - United States and China in World Politics

4 credit hours
Instructor: Ralph A. Thaxton, Jr.
Requirements Fulfilled: ss
M, T, Th 11:00 AM - 1:20 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
This course counts as an International and Global Studies (IGS) elective under the Global Governance, Conflict and Responsibility category.
This course focuses primarily on the following topics: issues in U.S.-China relations, including Taiwan and Tibet; the formation of a Greater China; military security and use of nuclear weapons; human rights; and Chinese and American versions of nationalism and internationalism.
Sage class number: 2117
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable, once per summer $50 registration fee.

PSYC 51a - Statistics

4 credit hours
Instructor: Yoona Lee
Requirements Fulfilled: qr, ss
M, T, Th 1:30 - 3:50 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
Prerequisite: PSYC 1a.
This course covers the fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistics. The various techniques useful in the behavioral sciences will be emphasized. Students learn the theory of statistical decisions, practical application of statistical software, and how to analyze journal articles.
Sage class number: 2118
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

PSYC 52a - Research Methods and Laboratory in Psychology

4 credit hours
Instructor: Michael Polito
Requirements Fulfilled: qr, ss, wi
M, T, Th 8:30 - 10:50 AM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
This is an experiential learning course. Prerequisites: PSYC 1a and 51a. This course may not be repeated for credit by students who have taken PSYC 152a in previous years.
In this course, you will learn how to conduct research in psychology. Through an intensive hands-on projects, you will learn about correlational and experimental design, have the opportunity to analyze data, and write comprehensive research reports in the style accepted by the American Psychological Association. The course offers supervised practice in experimental design, data analysis and interpretation, and formal presentation of experimental results.
Sage class number: 2119
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

SOC 129a - Sociology of Religion

4 credit hours
Instructor: Margaret Clendenen
Requirements Fulfilled: ss, wi
M, T, Th 11:00 AM - 1:20 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
This course offers an introduction to the sociological study of religion. In the course students investigate what religion is, how it is influential in contemporary American life, and how the boundaries of public and private religion are constructed and contested. This course is available for Undergraduate Credit only in Summer 2014.
Sage class number: 2120
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

SOC 155b - Protest, Politics, and Change: Social Movements

4 credit hours
Instructor: Jaleh Jalili
Requirements Fulfilled: ss
M, T, Th 1:30 - 3:50 PM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
This course utilizes case studies of actual movements to examine a variety of approaches to contentious politics. Covers collective behavior, resource mobilization, rational choice, and newer interactive models. This course is available for Undergraduate Credit only in Summer 2014.
Sage class number: 2123
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

SOC 191a - Health, Community, and Society

4 credit hours
Instructor: Catherine Tan
Requirements Fulfilled: ss
M, T, Th 11:00 AM - 01:20 PM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
This is an experiential learning course. This is a Core course for the HSSP program and counts toward a HSSP Major or Minor. This course will explore the interrelationships among society, health, and disease, emphasizing the social causes and experience of illness. This course is available for Undergraduate Credit only in Summer 2014.
Sage class number: 2124
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

THA 15b-1 - Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication (Section 1)

4 credit hours
Instructor: Jennifer Cleary
Requirements Fulfilled: ca, oc
M, T, Th 11:00 AM - 1:20 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
This is an experiential learning course.
This is an introductory course designed to present the basic concepts and techniques of making presentations to groups of people. Students will explore the principles of human communication and apply them to various situations and forms of spoken discourse. Students will develop a process for analyzing the audience, developing effective habits of vocal delivery, and for writing their own speeches. Content, research, personal style, and storytelling will also be examined.
Sage class number: 2133
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

THA 15b-2 - Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication (Section 2)

4 credit hours
Instructor: Jennifer Cleary
Requirements Fulfilled: ca, oc
M, T, Th 11:00 AM - 1:20 PM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
This is an experiential learning course.
This is an introductory course designed to present the basic concepts and techniques of making presentations to groups of people. Students will explore the principles of human communication and apply them to various situations and forms of spoken discourse. Students will develop a process for analyzing the audience, developing effective habits of vocal delivery, and for writing their own speeches. Content, research, personal style, and storytelling will also be examined.
Sage class number: 2134
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

THA 15b-3 - Public Speaking: The Art of Oral Communication (Section 3)

4 credit hours
Instructor: Alexander Jacobs
Requirements Fulfilled: ca, oc
M, T, Th 1:30 PM - 3:50 PM

Summer Session I: June 2 to July 3, 2014
This is an experiential learning course.
This is an introductory course designed to present the basic concepts and techniques of making presentations to groups of people. Students will explore the principles of human communication and apply them to various situations and forms of spoken discourse. Students will develop a process for analyzing the audience, developing effective habits of vocal delivery, and for writing their own speeches. Content, research, personal style, and storytelling will also be examined.
Sage class number: 2411
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

THA 71a - Playwriting

4 credit hours
Instructor: Joseph Coroniti
Requirements Fulfilled: ca, wi
Online, T, Th 9:15 - 10:45 AM

Extended Summer Session: June 2 to August 8, 2014
This is an experiential learning course. This course may not be taken for credit by students who took THA 104a in prior years. Please Note: This course does not count toward a Major or Minor in Creative Writing, but does fulfill the Writing Intensive Requirement for Degree Requirements.

In this Online Scriptwriting Workshop, students develop short plays or screenplays. Members give and receive written feedback according to their own schedules (and time zones). We also meet live online to share ideas and scenes.

Sample Topics: creating compelling action, three-dimensional characters in conflict, engaging dialogue, and stories that grab the audience's attention. In addition to stage plays or screenplays (drama or comedy) members may choose to create one-man/woman shows; performance art; or multimedia options employing additional art forms, e.g., music, video, or photography.

As models for writing, we will consider several plays and films by great dramatists. However, the focus will be on students' original scripts. Participants will write one ten-minute piece and one one-act piece.

Scripts will be considered for publication in FUSION: Global Art, Words, and Music: http://www.fusionmagazine.org/

Please note: Taking an online class differs greatly from taking a face-to-face class on campus. In order to receive the consent code necessary to enroll in an on-line class, students must arrange a conversation with the Summer School Director, Gwenn Smaxwill (781-736-3424), to discuss the differences between online course and face-to-face courses. At the conclusion of that conversation, students will receive a "Permission number" that will allow them to enroll in the course using the detailed registration steps found here. The "Permission Nbr" is used in Step #7 of the registration process.

Before your online class begins, students will be required to complete a self-paced LATTE tutorial to online learning. A student must have a UNET account and must be enrolled to access this tutorial which includes an overview of LATTE, the Brandeis course management website, for new and visiting students and an introduction to BlackBoard Collaborate, the system Brandeis uses to conduct live, webcam-to-webcam, class meetings.
Sage class number: 2136
Course Tuition: $2,550 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

UWS 12a - University Writing Seminar: Comedy and Sympathy

4 credit hours
Instructor: Steven Plunkett
Requirements Fulfilled: uws
M, T, Th 1:30 - 3:50 PM

Summer Session II: July 7 to August 8, 2014
What does it mean to find something funny? When we laugh, must we laugh at something or someone? Why do I sometimes feel such keen discomfort when watching reruns of I Love Lucy or The Office? Such notorious killjoys as Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Hobbes, and Immanuel Kant have given their attention to humor, and their evaluations haven't always been positive. Some claim that laughter must necessarily be an expression of contempt for another, that enjoyment of comedy encourages coarseness of feeling and deadens our sympathy for others. These thinkers say that comedy transforms our neighbors' pain and humiliation into entertainment. Certainly, racist or sexist humor seems to operate on this principle, and as the saying goes most often attributed to Mel Brooks "Tragedy is when I cut my finger; comedy is when you fall down an open manhole and die." However, there are also those who claim that laughter encourages human sympathy and community. Comedy, they claim, can both unite us in common understanding and help us get outside of our petty jealousies and prejudices by giving us a new perspective on the world. Humor, it turns out, may make us more able to care about each other and to understand our world. It may even be one of the more valuable forms of intellectual inquiry available to curious and sympathetic thinkers.

This course sets out to investigate the relationship between our capacity to enjoy comedy and our ability to appreciate the experiences of others, and seeks to provide interested students the opportunity to sharpen their academic skills and to deepen their analytic habits of mind.  We will examine the real and supposed tensions between comedy and sympathy by carefully considering key ideas from a variety of disciplines and by closely examining examples of humor from literature, the visual arts, and performances in television or film. The question of what we find funny and how we ought to regard that feeling offers ample opportunity to rigorously investigate examples of humor, to engage critically the often contentious scholarship that considers that question, and to produce original research suggesting some kind of answer to it over the course of three substantive essay assignments.  Students will leave the course with experience in applying essential strategies for framing and working through analytic questions in writing, amply prepared to begin with confidence their scholastic careers at Brandeis. Note: this is a special, one-time UWS offering that will not be available during the academic year.
Sage class number: 2127
Course Tuition: $2,422 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee