College Courses open to High School Students


Session:

Area of Interest:

ANTH 5a - Human Origins

4 credit hours
Instructor: Javier Urcid
Requirements Fulfilled: ss
M, T, Th 11:00 AM - 1:30 PM

Summer Session I: June 6 to July 8, 2016
Studies major evolutionary transformations of humanity from early hominins to anatomically modern humans, and offers an introduction to the theoretical frameworks and biological processes that explain these transformations. Fossilized remains and archaeological evidence serve to highlight the origins of bipedalism, expanded encephalization, increased reliance on material culture and technology, and the development of symbolic practices like language and art. Usually offered every year.
Sage class number: 2058
Course Tuition: $2,620 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

BIOL 15B - Cells and Organisms

4 credit hours
Instructor: Kene Piasta
Requirements Fulfilled: sn
M, T, W, Th 9:00am-11:00am

Summer Session I: June 6 to July 8, 2016
May not be taken for credit by students who took BIOL 22b in prior years.
This course introduces contemporary biology with an emphasis on cells, organs, and organ systems. Topics include the forms and functions of macromolecules, organelles, and cells, the integration of cells into tissues, and the physiology of fundamental life processes. The course is intended to prepare students to understand the biology of everyday life, and to provide a strong foundation for those who continue to study the life sciences.
Sage class number: 2061
Course Tuition: $2,620 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

BIOL 14a - Genetics and Genomics

4 credit hours
Instructor: Inna Nechipurenko
Requirements Fulfilled: qr, sn
M, T, W, Th 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Summer Session I: June 6 to July 8, 2016
This course studies the fundamentals of genetics, genomics, molecular biology, and biological problem-solving. Topics include heredity, meiosis, molecular basis of phenotypic variations in individuals and populations, as well as an introduction to the tools and techniques used by past and current researchers in genetics and genomics.
Sage class number: 2060
Course Tuition: $2,620 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

ENG 21a - Adolescent Literature

4 credit hours
Instructor: William Flesch
Requirements Fulfilled: hum
M, T, Th 11:00AM-1:30PM

Summer Session I: June 6 to July 8, 2016

Literature for adolescents can't afford any self-indulgences: its audience is too impatient. So it's a great place to see what's essential to storytelling. Authors may include Shelley, Twain, Salinger, Pullman, and Rowling, whom we'll use to test basic narrative theory.


Sage class number: 2073
Course Tuition: $2,620 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

ENG 10B - Poetry: A Basic Course

4 credit hours
Instructor: William Flesch
Requirements Fulfilled: hum, wi
M, T, Th 11:00 AM - 1:30 PM

Summer Session II: July 11 to August 12, 2016
Designed as a first course for all persons interested in the subject. It is intended to be basic without being elementary. The subject matter will consist of poems of short and middle length in English from the earliest period to the present.
Sage class number: 2106
Course Tuition: $2,620 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

FA 3a - Introduction to Drawing I

4 credit hours
Instructor: Sean Downey
Requirements Fulfilled: ca
M, T, Th 11:00 AM - 1:30 PM

Summer Session II: July 11 to August 12, 2016
An introduction to the materials and methods of drawing with wet media, intended for both studio majors and non-majors. This course will introduce students to traditional and contemporary approaches to using ink, watercolor, collage, and mixed media. Focusing on drawing as a basis for seeing and sharpening perception, students will learn a wide variety of approaches and techniques for creating convincing and accurate drawings from observation. Subject matter will include still-life, landscape, portraiture, and the figure.
Sage class number: 2108
Course Tuition: $2,620 plus a $40 Studio Art Fee and a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

FA 3b - Introduction to Drawing II: Wet Media

4 credit hours
Instructor: Alfredo Gisholt
Requirements Fulfilled: ca
M, T, Th 6:30 PM - 8:50 PM

Summer Session I: June 1 to July 2, 2015

Beginning-level course. No previous drawing experience necessary. Preference to first-year students and sophomores. May be repeated once for credit if taught by different instructors. Studio fee: $75 per semester. A studio class that introduces a range of drawing materials and methods, intended for both studio majors and non-majors. Students will draw from direct observation of still-life, landscape, and the human figure. Drawing media may include graphite, charcoal, ink, and collage, as well as watercolor and pastel. The drawings of great artists throughout history will be studied to provide examples of what is possible within this broad and expressive visual language.


Sage class number: 2429
Course Tuition: $2,519 plus a $40 Studio Art Fee and a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

FA 4a - Sculpture Foundation: 3D Design I

4 credit hours
Instructor: Christopher Frost
Requirements Fulfilled: ca
M, T, Th 11:00am-1:30pm

Summer Session I: June 6 to July 8, 2016
Beginning-level course. Preference to first-year students and sophomores. May be repeated once for credit if taught by different instructors. Studio fee: $75 per semester.

 Exploration of three-dimensional aspects of form, space, and composition utilizing a variety of materials and sculptural techniques. Emphasizes students' inventing of images through the use of modern materials and contemporary ideas about sculpture. Assignments are based on abstract thought and problem solving. The intent of this course is to give students a rich studio experience and promote a fresh and meaningful approach to visual concepts. Usually offered every semester.


Sage class number: 2079
Course Tuition: $2,620 plus a $75 studio art fee and a nonrefundable, once per summer $50 registration fee.

FA 30b - History of Art II: From the Renaissance to the Modern Age

4 credit hours
Instructor: Paula Carabell
Requirements Fulfilled: ca
M, T, Th 1:30 PM - 4:00 PM

Summer Session II: July 11 to August 12, 2016
This course is a study of the major styles in painting, sculpture and architecture of the West from the Renaissance to the middle of the twentieth century and will take into account the artistic, philosophical, cultural and political concepts that helped to form artistic production. The course will begin with a study of the Renaissance in Italy by examining the interplay between classical and Christian ideas and forms and will move chronologically through the successive periods of the 17th century Baroque in Italy and the Netherlands, the Enlightenment, 19 century Realism, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism in France, 20 century innovations in art such as Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Dada Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop and finally on to such characteristic Postmodernist forms as Appropriation and Performance.
Sage class number: 2109
Course Tuition: $2,620 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

MUS 1A - Exploring Western Music

4 credit hours
Instructor: Marc McAneny
Requirements Fulfilled: ca
M, T, Th 11:00AM-1:30PM

Summer Session II: July 11 to August 12, 2016

A general introduction to the materials and forms of music, and a study of western musical literature. Training in analytical listening, based on selected listening assignments. Open to non-majors who are assumed to have little or no previous knowledge of music. Does not meet requirements for the major or minor in music.
Sage class number: 2116
Course Tuition: $2,620 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

MUS 21A - History and Practice of Electronic Dance Music: A Global Perspective

4 credit hours
Instructor: Charles Hamilton Stratford
Requirements Fulfilled: ca
M, T, Th 1:30PM-4;00PM

Summer Session I: June 6 to July 8, 2016
This course examines the stylistic evolution, cultural significance, and technological dimensions of electronic dance music (“EDM”) from the late 1970s to the present day.  Some questions will be posed: what are the origins of electronic dance music and how does this genre affect other types of popular music?  How does one’s cultural sensibility influence the way that one creates and experiences music?  How have advancements in technology shaped the development of this genre?  We shall address the origins of EDM as a new creative movement emerging from Detroit, Germany and the UK, leading into its prominence in mainstream culture worldwide.  Particular attention will be devoted to how the cultural dynamics of race, class, and identity influence the creation and reception of this music.  Designed as listening intensive, this course aims at developing listening skills and the ability to reflect on the music through short weekly writing assignments, with the goal of being able to discuss and think about EDM intelligently.  While some musical knowledge is beneficial, this course is intended for non music-majors with any level of experience in playing, writing, or studying music.
Sage class number: 2327
Course Tuition: $2,620 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

NEJS 185B - The Making of the Modern Middle East

4 credit hours
Instructor: Randall Geller
Requirements Fulfilled: hum, nw, ss, wi
M, T, Th 11:00AM-1:30PM

Summer Session I: June 6 to July 8, 2016
One hundred years ago, the borders of modern Middle Eastern states did not exist; conquering European countries carved up the former Ottoman Empire and created new states – and new problems. In this class we will explore the development of each Middle Eastern country’s unique identity and history and the domestic and foreign problems, policies, and issues each country faces today.  In this context we will explore the role of the Great Powers after World War I, the role of the United States in the promotion of regime change in the Arab and broader Muslim world and its effects on the region today, as well as more recent Russian intervention in Syria.  We will explore tensions between Arab nationalism and political Islam and the after-effects of the Arab Spring.  We will learn about the war and the mass refugee crisis in Syria and how the region, Europe, and the United States intend to manage it.  We will explore the role of ISIS and other militant groups, the Shii Islamic theocracy in Iran, as well as tensions between a legacy of secularism after World War I and a return to Islamism in Turkey.   Finally, we will explore how ethnic and sectarian differences impact and define each Middle Eastern country’s social and political development.  The class will be discussion-based with lecture; relevant video footage will be used to illuminate the region’s unique history and political style.
Sage class number: 2088
Course Tuition: $2,620 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

NEJS 189A - Arab-Israeli Conflict

4 credit hours
Instructor: Randall Geller
Requirements Fulfilled: hum, ss
M, T, Th 11:00AM-1:30PM

Summer Session II: July 11 to August 12, 2016

With violence between Israelis and Palestinians threatening to spiral out of control and with a Middle East in tremendous turmoil just beyond Israel’s borders, studying the roots, development, and present-day issues that define the Arab-Israeli Conflict will help us better understand one of the most enduring conflicts of our time.  In this course, we will learn about the birth of Israel in 1948, the origins of the Palestinian refugee problem, the multiple wars between Israel and the Arab states, the rise of the PLO, Hamas, and Hizballah as well as efforts to achieve peace.  The role of oil and the status of the West Bank, Gaza, and Jerusalem will be explored in this course through a combination of lecture, video, and discussion; current events will play a major role too.  By the conclusion of the course students should have a far better grasp of the core issues of a conflict that has dominated the headlines for more than half a century and likely will continue to for decades to come.
Sage class number: 2117
Course Tuition: $2,620 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

PHIL 6A - Introduction to Symbolic Logic

4 credit hours
Instructor: Nelson James Hosley
Requirements Fulfilled: hum
M, T, Th 8:00AM-11:00AM

Summer Session II: July 11 to August 12, 2016
Symbolic logic provides concepts and formal techniques that elucidate deductive reasoning. Topics include truth functions and quantifiers, validity, and formal systems.
Sage class number: 2118
Course Tuition: $2,620 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

PSYC 10a - Introduction to Psychology

4 credit hours
Instructor: Michael Polito
Requirements Fulfilled: ss
M, T, Th 11:00AM-1:30PM

Summer Session II: July 11 to August 12, 2016
Formerly offered as PSYC 1a. PSYC 10a is the introductory course for Psychology majors and is a prerequisite for most other courses in the major. May not be taken for credit by students who took PSYC 1a in prior years.

A survey of contemporary psychology. Topics include brain and behavior, perception, memory, learning, cognitive processes, plasticity, intelligence, child and adult development, personality, social behavior, and the relationship between normal and abnormal behavior.
Sage class number: 2121
Course Tuition: $2,620 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

SOC 117A - Sociology of Work and Gender

4 credit hours
Instructor: Kimberley Lucas
Requirements Fulfilled: ss
M, T, Th 11:00 AM-1:30 PM

Summer Session I: June 6 to July 8, 2016
While we may not recognize it, gender plays a profound role in the way in which we all experience everyday life. Work, a major facet of society, is deeply affected by gender. While the wage gap between men and women has decreased over the past several decades, it persists nonetheless. This course examines gender disparities in both unpaid and paid work and how these disparities affect everyone’s lives (regardless of gender) and society at large, and by using a sociological lens, this course begins to uncover the societal mechanisms through which phenomena like the wage gap, traditional gender roles, and gendered jobs persist.
Sage class number: 2092
Course Tuition: $2,620 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

SOC 129a - Sociology of Religion

4 credit hours
Instructor: Margaret Anne Clendenen
Requirements Fulfilled: ss, wi
M, T, Th 11:00AM-1:30PM

Summer Session II: July 11 to August 12, 2016
An introduction to the sociological study of religion. Investigates what religion is, how it is influential in contemporary American life, and how the boundaries of public and private religion are constructed and contested. Usually offered every year.
Sage class number: 2124
Course Tuition: $2,620 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

SOC 191a - Health, Community, and Society

4 credit hours
Instructor: Thomas Bertorelli
Requirements Fulfilled: ss
M, T, Th 8:30 - 11:00 AM

Summer Session I: June 6 to July 8, 2016

Despite sustained efforts at reducing health inequity, disparities still exist in the onset, courses, and outcomes of illness in the US. To better understand the social conditions that create these inequalities, this course will focus on the relationships between society, health, and disease to uncover the social causes of illness. Topics that will be covered include: the social construction of illness, the experience of illness, social epidemiology, and neighborhood effects on health. Emphasis will be placed on how social categories such as race, gender, social class, and education affect health outcomes.


Sage class number: 2093
Course Tuition: $2,620 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee

UWS 26A - Comedy and Sympathy

4 credit hours
Instructor: Steven Plunkett
Requirements Fulfilled: uws
M, T, Th 1:30 - 4:00 PM

Summer Session II: July 11 to August 12, 2016
What does it mean to find something funny?  When we laugh, must we laugh at something or someone?  Why do I sometimes feel such keen discomfort when watching reruns of I Love Lucy or The Office?  Such notorious killjoys as Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Hobbes, and Immanuel Kant have given their attention to humor, and their evaluations haven't always been positive.  Some claim that laughter must necessarily be an expression of contempt for another, that enjoyment of comedy encourages coarseness of feeling and deadens our sympathy for others.  These thinkers say that comedy transforms our neighbors' pain and humiliation into entertainment.  Certainly, racist or sexist humor seems to operate on this principle, and as the saying goes –– most often attributed to Mel Brooks –– "Tragedy is when I cut my finger; comedy is when you fall down an open manhole and die."  However, there are also those who claim that laughter encourages human sympathy and community.  Comedy, they claim, can both unite us in common understanding and help us get outside of our petty jealousies and prejudices by giving us a new perspective on the world.  Humor, it turns out, may make us more able to care about each other and to understand our world.  It may even be one of the more valuable forms of intellectual inquiry available to curious and sympathetic thinkers. This course sets out to investigate the relationship between our capacity to enjoy comedy and our ability to appreciate the experiences of others, and seeks to provide interested students the opportunity to sharpen their academic skills and to deepen their analytic habits of mind.  We will examine the real and supposed tensions between comedy and sympathy by carefully considering key ideas from a variety of disciplines and by closely examining examples of humor from literature, the visual arts, and performances in television or film.  The question of what we find funny and how we ought to regard that feeling offers ample opportunity to rigorously investigate examples of humor, to engage critically the often contentious scholarship that considers that question, and to produce original research suggesting some kind of answer to it over the course of three substantive essay assignments.  Students will leave the course with experience in applying essential strategies for framing and working through analytic questions in writing, amply prepared to begin with confidence their scholastic careers at Brandeis.
Sage class number: TBA
Course Tuition: $2,620 plus a nonrefundable once per summer $50 registration fee