Related Events

Film Screening: Transnational Tradeswomen (2006) with Filmmaker Vivian Price

Monday, Oct. 13, 3:30 p.m.

Transnational Tradeswomen documents a road trip, set off by the 1995 Women’s Conference in Beijing, that explores the situations of women construction laborers in Asia. The story disturbs the common notion that modernization, education, and technology result in gender equality and the alleviation of poverty. It also raises the question: does the gendering of work in construction provide a transnational connection among the women who work in the industry?

Opening Reception

Honoring the Contributions of Massachusetts Tradeswomen

Thursday, Oct. 16, 5:30 p.m.

Tradeswomen Conference - "30 Years and Still Organizing"

Saturday, Oct. 18, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Speakers include Nancy Mason, IBEW Local 46/Seattle and local tradeswomen. Moderated by Susan Eisenberg.

The Lonesomeness of Pioneering

Tuesday, Oct. 28, 12:30 p.m.

Surrounded by her installation, Susan Eisenberg reads poems about construction work — and the women who install power, move earth and add their signature to the skyline.

Building the Future

Monday, Dec. 8, 10 a.m.

Vocational-technical high school students are invited to a special viewing of "On Equal Terms," followed by discussion about the art exhibit and students' hopes for their careers.

On Equal Terms

hardhat.jpg

Stella’s “Diamond” Hard Hat


A Mixed-Media Installation
by Susan Eisenberg

Oct. 6, 2008, to Jan. 9, 2009

On Equal Terms combines realistic and fanciful works of art with personal testimonies to bring viewers into the frontline experience of the first tradeswomen who crossed onto construction sites. Coinciding with the 30th anniversary of Affirmative Action, the exhibition celebrates the pioneers, as well as the tradeswomen and their allies who have kept the gates open for three decades.

On Equal Terms honors the construction industry, while aiming to increase employment equity for women in the trades. The exhibition focuses conversation about the cost of gender barriers in any occupation – and what it would mean to treat all individuals on equal terms.

Susan Eisenberg, an artist, poet, activist, WSRC Scholar and master electrician, has interviewed more than 30 other women in the trades about their experiences. Her installation reflects these candid conversations. 

Curated by Wendy Tarlow Kaplan.