2019-20 EVENTS


Monday, September 9th - 12-2pm Dr. Cornelius Adebahr
Brandeis Faculty Club Lounge
Luncheon Talk with
Dr. Cornelius Adebahr,
Carnegie Europe:
German and European Policy toward Iran
co-sponsored by the American Council on Germany
Eric M.Warburg Chapter

Dr. Cornelius Adebahr is a political analyst and consultant living in Berlin, Germany. His work focuses on European foreign policy issues, transatlantic relations, and Iran. Since the end of 2000, he has been the owner of Wirtschaft am Wasserturm – Political Consultancy, Project Development, and Training. In addition, he is a non-resident fellow at Carnegie Europe in Brussels and an associate fellow of the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP), as well as a member of the Team Europe of the European Commission. He was a lecturer at Georgetown University (2015/16), at Tehran University (2012/13), and at the Willy Brandt School of Public Policy at Erfurt University (2005-2011).  From 2009 to 2011, he was a fellow of the New Leadership Foundation (stiftung neue verantwortung) in Berlin, and in 2002/2003 of the Robert Bosch Foundation’s Post-Graduate Program in International Affairs. Dr. Adebahr studied Political Science (International Relations), Philosophy, Public Law, and International Economics in Tübingen, Paris, and at the Free University Berlin, where he graduated in 2001 before receiving his PhD in 2008 with an analysis of the work of the EU Special Representatives. His analysis of the EU’s foreign policy towards Iran, with a particular focus on the nuclear negotiations (2003-2015), appeared with Routledge in 2017.

adebahr



Thursday, September 12th - 12-2pm H. G. Adler
Brandeis Faculty Club Lounge
Luncheon Talk with author Peter Filkins:
Writing History, Writing Biography: Capturing H.G. Adler's Many Worlds 
co-sponsored by the English Department, the History Department, the Tauber Institute for the Study of European Jewry, and the European Cultural Studies Program.

H.G. Adler (1910 - 1988) lived at the center of his times and on their margin. A survivor of Theresienstadt, Auschwitz, and two other concentration camps, he chronicled his experience and the loss of others in two dozen books of seminal history, modernist fiction, formally intricate poems, and insightful essays. Yet, despite close friendship with Leo Baeck, Elias Canetti, and Heinrich Böll, he remained  a writer's writer, largely unknown and neglected. Thus, unlike with better known figures, the story of his life must be told through the times in which he lived, as well as how the same lived through him. On the publication of H.G. Adler: A Life in Many Worlds, biographer and translator Peter Filkins discusses the intersection of biography and history in shaping the story of Adler's life and work.

Peter Filkins is an award-winning poet and translator. His authorized biography H.G. Adler: A Life in Many Worlds appeared in 2019 from Oxford University Press, and he has translated three novels by H.G. Adler, Panorama, The Journey, and The Wall, as well as the collected poems of Ingeborg Bachmann, Darkness Spoken. The recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Leon Levy Center for Biography, the DAAD, and the American Academy in Berlin, he is the Richard B. Fisher Professor of Literature at Bard College at Simon’s Rock, and also teaches translation at Bard College.

peter filkins


Not Your Toy

Israel-Europe Relations through the Lens of the Eurovision Song Contest

dr eurovision posing


Thursday, October 10
5:30-7pm
Mandel Humanities Center 303 (Level 3)

Why does Israel participate in a European song contest, and what does this contest say about how Israel and Europe relate to each other? How can popular culture inform how we study international relations? Join us to learn why this contest is crucial for understanding both Israel and Europe today. 


Panelists:

Dr. Shayna Weiss, in conversation with:

Paul Jordan, aka Dr.Eurovision

Dr. Hankus Netsky, the co-chair of Contemporary Improvisation at the New England Conservatory 

Moderator:

Dr. Sabine von Mering, director of the Center for German and European Studies



  

A Green Perspective on the future of the EU and the changing political landscape in Germany

Friday, October 11th

12-2 PM

Faculty Club Lounge

 Franziska Brantner posing for the camera

with Franziska Brantner,

Member of Parliament, Buendnis90/Die Gruenen [Green Party]

 

Co-sponsored by the Heinrich Boell Foundation, Washington, D.C.



Franziska Brantner has been a member of the Bundestag for the German Green Party since 2013. She is currently the Green spokesperson for European affairs, and a member of the committee on foreign affairs. Before her time in the Bundestag, she was a member of the European parliament.

 

At Brandeis Ms. Brantner will talk about the current political challenges facing the European Union, from the impending Brexit to right-wing populist governments within the EU to the strained transatlantic relationship. She will also discuss the changing political landscape in Germany, where the Green Party has surged in the polls, and is currently on par with the conservative party of Angela Merkel.

student employee introducing the speaker

 


Peter R. Gossels & Simon Lütgemeyer

Neighbors through time

Lippehner 35 - the forgotten history of a Berlin house

old blueprint of a house

Tuesday October 15th

7-9 PM

Napoli Room, Gosman

 

When two Stolpersteine (stumbling blocks) were placed in front of the house next door in March 2018, Simon became curious about the history of his own house, where he has lived since 1999. He lives there now with his wife Britta and daughters Enna Lio (b. 2008) and Mila Bo (b. 2011).

After finding the old address books, he learned that the name of the owner of his building had been Isidor Lewy, who bought the building in 1904. He then learned from the manager of his building that Isidor Lewy’s grandchildren had sold the building to the current owners in the early 90s and he came across the name of Peter Gossels, a grandson of Isidor Lewy.  So, he sent him a first letter, hoping to find out more about the building's past. This was the beginning of an amazing journey into a whole book of stories of which none of the current tenants were aware of.

The destinct Jewish past of this house, in a street which changed its name in 1974 from Lippehner into Käthe-Niederkirchner-Strasse (after a communist resistance heroine) but not its numbers, had been completely forgotten over decades, because no one asked about former layers of life within the old walls.

peter gossels over zoom conference

audience at the event


 

Britta Wilmsmeier:

Story Telling With Migrants

Britta Wilmsmeier holding a crown


Wednesday October 16th

12-2 PM

Mandel Reading Room

Britta Wilsmeier is a story teller in Berlin, who works with immigrant children in various schools. 

She created a staged reading of Peter Gossels’ story on June 16 at the local "Theater unterm Dach" together with Roman Ott. 

Due to its success, there was another reading on Sept. 29. For more information see this article (German).

britta wilmsmeier


 Olga Grjasnowa:

olga grjasnowa poster

Tuesday October 22nd

12-2 PM

Faculty Club Lounge

Olga Grjasnowa is the author of "City of Jasmine", a captivating story following a family in the Syrial Civil War. It offers real insight into the horrors of war, but also explores the humanity of the protagonists.
Grjasnowa is one of the most talented young German authors today. 
olga grajsnowa

 Thomas Pletzinger: The Great Nowitzki

Dirk Nowitzki

Wednesday October 23rd 

12-2PM

Faculty Club Lounge

pletzinger holding his talk

Co-Sponsored by the Boston Goethe Institut and Brandeis Athletics

Please RSVP


Brexit: The Continuing Chaos Part 2

map of europe with a line drawn between Great Britain and the EU

with 

 

Monday October 28th

12-2PM

Rapaporte Treasure Hall

 

More info

RSVP

 


Hans Fischer: SS St. Louis

ss st louis

Monday November 4th

7-9 PM

Hassenfeld Lurias

Jewish-German Dialogue with Dr. Hans Fisher, survivor of the SS St.Louis 

In commemoration of the Nazi pogrom known as “Kristallnacht” of November 9, 1939, CGES invites you to join us for a conversation with SS St.Louis passenger and survivor Dr Hans Fisher. We will also be showing a clip from Robert M.Krakow’s documentary Complicit.

The SS St.Louis sailed from Germany to Cuba with 937 mostly Jewish passengers on board in May 1939 -  only to be refused entry in Cuba, the United States, and Canada. Upon its return to Europe, 254 of the passengers were later murdered in the Holocaust.

Hans Fisher, then a young boy, is among the surviving passengers and will share his experience of the journey and his survival.

 Robert M.Krakow’s documentary film Complicit (2013) weaves the story of the SS St Louis into the political drama unfolding within the Roosevelt Administration regarding its policies on the Jewish refugee issues during the wartime period. The film addresses the issues of immigration, refugee policy and the civilized world’s response to genocide.


Critical Conversations - Fiddling While Rome Burns

man holding bills in front of a geometric background

Info

Tuesday November 5th 

5:30 - 7:00 PM

Sherman Function Hall

 

Hans Fisher

Surviving the "Voyage of the Damned": A SS St. Louis Survivors Account

ss st louis

Monday November 4th

7-9 PM

Hassenfeld Lurias

Jewish-German Dialogue with Dr. Hans Fisher, survivor of the SS St.Louis 

In commemoration of the Nazi pogrom known as “Kristallnacht” of November 9, 1939, CGES invites you to join us for a conversation with SS St.Louis passenger and survivor Dr Hans Fisher. We will also be showing a clip from Robert M.Krakow’s documentary Complicit.

The SS St.Louis sailed from Germany to Cuba with 937 mostly Jewish passengers on board in May 1939 -  only to be refused entry in Cuba, the United States, and Canada. Upon its return to Europe, 254 of the passengers were later murdered in the Holocaust.

Hans Fisher, then a young boy, is among the surviving passengers and will share his experience of the journey and his survival.

 Robert M.Krakow’s documentary film Complicit (2013) weaves the story of the SS St Louis into the political drama unfolding within the Roosevelt Administration regarding its policies on the Jewish refugee issues during the wartime period. The film addresses the issues of immigration, refugee policy and the civilized world’s response to genocide.


Deutschlandjahr Teil III - Winnetou and Old Shatterhand; German Settlers in the Americas

 screenshot from winnetou movie showing winnetou and old shatterhand
german flag with writing "wunderbar together"

Friday November 8th

12-2PM

Skyline Commons

Every child in Germany grows up with Winnetou and Old Shatterhand (pictured above) - the fictional Apache Chief and his German Settler friend, invented by bestselling novelist (and criminal) Karl May in the late 19th century. Over 50 percent of Americans have German heritage, but Winnetou and Old Shatterhand are largely unknown in the US. Unfortunately, many Americans also know very little about real native Americans. 

After having played the boardgame Catan (previously known as ‘Settlers of Catan’) without questioning its harmless depiction of the act of settlement in November and March, in this final panel of our Deutschlandjahr activities we take a serious look at the relationship between fact and fiction, at the history of German settlements in the Americas, and at the lives of native Americans past and present.  

Panelists:

Moderator:

 

RSVP


Peter Keup: From Communist Dictatorship to Free Democracy

an image depicting the commemorative installation at the workhouse

Thursday November 14th 

7-9PM

Thirty years ago, on November 9, 1989, the Berlin wall opened. Peter Keup describes what life in the GDR dictatorship was like. His father was a Communist, and after the Communist Party was made illegal in West Germany, he and Peter’s mother moved to the GDR. When Peter was 16, his parents applied to move back to West Germany, but their application was denied. Ostracized from society and under constant surveillance, Peter discovered dancing and became a professional dancer. In 1981, Peter attempted to flee. His plan was discovered, and he was imprisoned for ten months. Freed by the Federal Republic of Germany (through an arranged exchange), he moved to the West in 1982. Thirty years later, he discovered that his brother had worked for the Stasi (the GDR’s secret police). 

RSVP