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Commentary on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) by Brandeis International Business School Interim Dean Peter Petri

Commentary on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) by Interim Dean Peter Petri

Peter Petri, Brandeis IBS Interim Dean

November 15, 2017

Brandeis International Business School (IBS) Interim Dean Peter Petri shares commentary on the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

President Donald Trump pulled the United States out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a international trade pact, on his first day in office. This past weekend, the 11 remaining countries went forward with the agreement without the United States. 

Brandeis International Business School Interim Dean Peter Petri, who led a research team analyzing the TPP, discussed the implications across global media outlets.

Speaking with the BBC World Service, Petri said that Vietnam, in particular, “counted on American markets, particularly clothing and garments, to justify very serious concessions it made on labor rights… the hope for them is, first of all, direct benefits … from the 11 countries, but this will grow. Eventually, perhaps Europe will be involved, too.” 

“The TPP-11 will be good for the multilateral trading system, for the incomes of member countries and for their bargaining positions against China and the United States,” Dean Petri told The Wall Street Journal. He also argued for multilateral trade agreements on American Public Media’s Marketplace.

“The United States needs to get back in the game” Petri and co-author Professor Michael Plummer of Johns Hopkins University wrote in an op-ed in The Hill, concluding that the “letting links between Asia and the United States decay would be an historic mistake.”

Petri and his co-authors also published related op-eds in the Nikkei Asian Review, the Chinese weekly Caixin and the Japanese daily Nihon Keizai Shimbun. Petri is the Carl J. Shapiro Professor of International Finance and a visiting fellow at the Washington-based think tank, the Peterson Institute for International Economics.