Fall 2019 Courses

German Language

Ger 10a Beginning German

Intended for students with little or no previous knowledge of German. Emphasis is placed on comprehending, reading, writing, and conversing in German and the presentation of basic grammar. Class work is enhanced by various interactive classroom activities and is supplemented by extensive language lab, video, and computer-aided exercises.
Ms. Seidl

Section I  MTWTh 10-10:50; II: 11-11:50

If you have already had German prior, please contact Ms. Seidl.

Ger 30a Intermediate German

[Prerequisite: Ger 20]

In concluding the development of the four language speaking skills — comprehending, writing, reading, and speaking — this course focuses on finishing up the solid grammar foundation that was laid in GER 10a and GER 20b. It also presents additional audio and video material, films, radio plays, and newspaper and magazine articles, as well as a variety of extensive interactive classroom activities.

Ms. von Mering

MWTh 10-10:50

 

German Language, Literature

GER105b Survey of German Literature from Its Beginnings to the Present [fl hum oc]

Prerequisite: GER 30a

Examines the relationship between individual and their society throughout history on the basis of fictional and nonfictional German texts (poetry, philosophical texts, short prose, and plays), films and artifacts (photographs, paintings, monuments, coins and tools). While this course focuses on the work of German-language writers, it offers also insights into German social history and the socio-political changes accompanying the transformation of a medieval God-given society into a multi-ethnic society of the 20th and 21st century.

Ms. Seidl

MWTh 12-12:50 p.m.

GER 109b Meisterwerke Deutscher Kurzprosa [fl hum]

Prerequisites: GER 103 recommended.

Tailored to suit the needs of advanced intermediate students, this course explores in detail several short prose masterworks by writers including Martin Buber, Franz Kafka, Friedrich Nietzsche, Thomas Mann, Rainer Maria Rilke, and Arthur Schnitzler.

Mr. Dowden

MWTh 11-11:50 a.m.

German and European Cultural Studies

ECS 100a Proseminar: Modernism [ dl hum oc wi ]

Explores the interrelationship of literature, music, painting, philosophy and other arts in the era of high modernism. Works by Artaud, Baudelaire, Benjamin, Mann, Mahler, Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Kandinsky, Schiele, Beckett, Brecht, Adorno, Sartre, Heidegger and others.

Mr. Dowden

MW 2-3:20

 

GECS 130b The Princess and the Golem: Fairy Tales [hum, wi]

Compares Walt Disney’s films with German and other European fairy tales from the 19th and 20th century, focusing on feminist and psychoanalytic readings.

Ms. von Mering

MW 3:30-4:50 p.m.

Cross-listed Courses

HIST 123b Reformation Europe (1400-1600)

Survey of Protestant and Catholic efforts to reform religion in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Topics include scholastic theology, popular piety and anticlericalism, Luther's break with Rome, the rise of Calvinism, Henry VIII and the English Reformation, the Catholic resurgence, and the impact of reform efforts on the lives of common people.

Mr. Sreenivasan

MW 3:30-4:50 p.m.

HIST 137b WWI

Survey of Protestant and Catholic efforts to reform religion in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Topics include scholastic theology, popular piety and anticlericalism, Luther's break with Rome, the rise of Calvinism, Henry VIII and the English Reformation, the Catholic resurgence, and the impact of reform efforts on the lives of common people.

Mr. Jankowski    

MWTh 11-11:50 a.m.

POL 189a Marx, Nietzsche, and 20th Century Radicalism

Comparison of two powerful and influential critiques of modern politics and society. Explanation of Marx's work, both for its own insights and as a model for radical theorists; and of Nietzsche's work as an alternative conception of radical social criticism.

Mr. Yack

TF 12:30-1:50 p.m.

NEJS 159a

Surveys the contours of modern Jewish philosophy by engaging some of its most important themes and voices, competing Jewish inflections of and responses to rationalism, romanticism, idealism, existentialism, and nihilism. This provides the conceptual road signs of the course as we traverse the winding byways of Jewish philosophy from Baruch Spinoza to Emanuel Levinas.

Mr. Sheppard

TF 9:30-10:50 a.m.

COML 100a Introduction to Global Literature

What is common and what is different in literatures of different cultures and times? How do literary ideas move from one culture to another? In this course students read theoretical texts, as well as literary works from around the world.

Mr. Fraleigh

MW 2-3:20pm

Comparative Literature

COML 100a: Introduction to Global Literature

What is common and what is different in literatures of different cultures and times? How do literary ideas move from one culture to another? In this course students read theoretical texts, as well as literary works from around the world.

Mr. Fraleigh

MW 2-3:20pm