Resumes

A resume is a marketing tool highlighting selected academic, professional and leadership accomplishments that demonstrate a fit between you and the opportunity. It should address the needs and requirements of your targeted audience.

Avoid resume templates and tables, as they often make editing more difficult. Remember good writers revise, and a resume is a living document that is constantly revised, updated and tailored. A resume is example of your writing skills, it should be well written, perfectly punctuated, honest and concise. Have your resume reviewed by Hiatt before submitting it or sending to a networking contact.

Experience comes from everything you do and may include paid and unpaid work, full and part-time jobs, volunteering, campus leadership positions, athletics, academic/classroom project work, research. Tailor your experience section for each position, including what is most relevant and related.

Tips for Getting Started

Your documents should present who you are as a candidate in a clear, concise, and compelling way, that is customized for the position to which you are applying. To get started, we suggest the following:

Applying for the business major: 

Resume approval is not required when applying for the Brandeis business major. We strongly encourage all students to have their resume reviewed before submitting their applications.

Learn more about resume formatting, view the Anatomy of a Resume Guide, and use the Interactive Resume Index to view sample resumes. Try out Hiration for professional-looking resumes and help crafting bullet points with an AI assistant.

Formatting

Sections

Education

The education section is generally the first entry on your resume. Once you’re in college we generally stop including high school in the education section, but all schools or programs are listed as most recent first.

Experience

Experience comes from everything you do and may include paid and unpaid work, full and part-time jobs, volunteering, campus leadership positions, athletics, academic/classroom project work, research. Tailor your experience section for each position, including what is most relevant and related.

Skills

In addition to your education and experience, you likely have skills that are useful for the position that you are applying for. A skills section may be made up of technical, language, certifications or laboratory skill-related information. Avoid generic qualities "good with people," "hard-working," or "excellent communication skills”

Portfolios

A portfolio is a showcase for your achievements and talents, which can be used to show samples of your work certificates, diplomas, awards, letters of commendation and so on. It is most often presented online/electronically, in a good quality binder, or in a visual arts portfolio.

A portfolio allows you to expand on your résumé in a comprehensive manner and concretely share your area of expertise.  You can be more creative in your portfolio than you are in producing your résumé and cover letter. If you create a "master portfolio," you can easily pick and choose items to customize a portfolio for a particular position.