Past Newsletters

September 2021 Journalism News 

A roundup of news from the Journalism Program, compiled by Jen Crystal and Anna Nappi, Journalism UDRs.  Media Producer:  Noah Zeitlin

Meet the Minor Night with Jay Feinstein ’17
Associate Producer & Business Development Director, PRI’s Living on Earth 

Thursday, Sept. 30, from 7-8 p.m. ET in the Golding Judaica Center, 110 

Please join us for engaging conversation and light refreshments and learn more about the benefits of minoring in Journalism at Brandeis and the new courses and people we’ve added to our team. Our special guest will be Jay Feinstein ‘17, who will discuss how he uses what he learned in his Brandeis journalism and other courses in his current role as producer for the award-winning, weekly environmental news podcast and broadcast, Living on Earth.

Jay holds a BA in Environmental Studies from Brandeis University and both a Master of Business Administration and a Master of Science in Accounting degree from the D’Amore-McKim School of Business. At Brandeis, he was one of the co-founders of the Brandeis Rooftop Community Farm, and even today he will never pass up a good farmers market.

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Hello and welcome (or welcome back!) to the Journalism Program!

We would like to introduce ourselves as the journalism undergraduate departmental representatives (UDRs). We are your go-to resource for any questions you may have about the Journalism Program here at Brandeis. 

Jen Crystal is a junior from Bloomington, Indiana, majoring in Psychology and Sociology, and minoring in Journalism. Anna Nappi is a senior from Portland, Maine, majoring in Psychology and Film, Television & Interactive Media, and minoring in Journalism. We are so excited for everything Brandeis Journalism has to offer this year, and we can’t wait to meet you all, whether in person or online! 

Feel free to email us with any questions — or just to chat about college life (or whatever floats your boat)! Now, let’s get to the good stuff.! Below, please find a compilation of this month’s journalism news.

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New and Returning Faculty

Rachel Kim Raczka is the Journalism Department’s new Assistant Director for Internships and Outreach. She will be working one-on-one with Journalism minors to advise them on how to land rewarding internships, so please reach out to her to introduce yourself. (Contact info below.) As a journalist and lecturer based in Boston, Rachel writes for Fast Company magazine, covering consumer startups and shopping trends, and edits for the Boston Globe's Living Arts section. She also teaches at Emerson College and is an MFA of Creative Writing candidate at Lesley University. She's been published in the Washington Post, Boston Globe Magazine, New York Magazine, Cherry Bombe, Martha Stewart Living, and Time Out New York

Fred Barbash, a new Lecturer, is a former reporter and editor for the Washington Post with four decades of experience in traditional and digital journalism spanning the areas of local, national, foreign and financial news, with a speciality in legal issues. At the Post, he served as National editor, London bureau chief, Supreme Court reporter, and founding editor of the “Morning Mix” digital initiative. This semester, his course, Contemporary Media: Internships and Analysis, seeks to transition students from interns to newsroom-ready professionals by training them to generate ideas for engaging news features -- and to deliver them on deadline. 

Ann Silvio, a returning Lecturer, is a journalist, storyteller, and digital media executive with 20 years of experience at legacy news organizations. Most recently, she was a story coach for young producers at a news startup, and for the past decade, she was a senior producer at 60 Minutes. Silvio founded and led 60 Minutes' digital arm, an editorial team that churned out original features for digital platforms and transformed the culture of one of journalism's most respected newsrooms. She designed her course this semester, Culture of Journalism, based on her newsroom experience as a senior producer, editor, and researcher. In this class, students take an unflinching look at the roiling controversies and flash points in modern American journalism. She will host accomplished guest speakers and will lead students through case studies in this newly reimagined course.

Josh Wolk, a new Lecturer, is an editor, journalist, digital executive, and author with more than two decades’ experience in arts and entertainment journalism. After 12 years at Entertainment Weekly, where he began as EW.com’s first online writer and ended as senior editor of the TV department, he moved to New York Magazine in 2009 to revamp their culture site, Vulture. Under his leadership as its first editorial director, Vulture became a much-imitated leader in the arts & culture journalism space. In his Arts Journalism, Pop Culture and Digital Innovation course this semester, students will examine the evolution of entertainment journalism in all its forms, and discuss how to evolve it further for an inundated and yet ever-hungry audience of savvy film/TV/music obsessives. He will host accomplished feature writers, TV beat reporters, and critics as guest speakers. 

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Student Spotlight 

Our website’s Student Spotlight highlights the great work being done by students in the program. 

Through quality multimedia storytelling, fourth-year journalism student Gavi Klein explores the challenging nature of college sustainability work, the story of Brandeis' rooftop farm, and the origins of Brandeis students' commitment to climate justice in a two-part audio series.

Senior Jared Panson profiled the late Celtics standout coach and player K.C. Jones, who led the Brandeis men’s basketball team in the late 1960s as the first Black head basketball coach in the NCAA. Jared produced stirring audio and video mini-documentaries spotlighting the Hall-of-Famer’s enduring legacy.

Find Gavi and Jared’s Student Spotlight work here

If you have work to be spotlighted by our newsletter in the future, please email rachelraczka@brandeis.edu

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Follow Us! 

Follow the Brandeis Journalism Program online with our new accounts: Instagram (@BrandeisJournalism), Twitter (@BrandeisJOUR) and Facebook (@BrandeisUniversityJournalism). We’ll be posting updates on new courses, upcoming events, and exciting student and alumni news. 

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Internships, Scholarships & Opportunities:

  • The Washington Post, Summer 2022 Internship
    Deadline: Oct. 6. Apply now. 
  • The Wall Street Journal, Summer 2022 Internship, Podcasts
    Deadline: Nov. 1, Apply now.
  • NECN, Fall Internship, Digital Newsroom (Needham, MA)
    Deadline: ASAP, Apply now.
  • Oxford America, Editorial Internship
    Deadline: Nov 15 (for January start), Apply now.
  • Bloomberg, Summer 2022 News Internship
    Deadline: Oct. 22, Apply now.
  • Politico, Summer 2022 Editorial Internship
    Deadline: Nov. 2, Apply now.

For more information on internship opportunities, please contact our new Assistant Director of Internships & Outreach, Rachel Raczka.

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Resources:

Media Access: As a Brandeis student, you have free access through our library to many newspapers and magazines, even if those publications have paywalls that make their content open only to subscribers. Here's a handy guide with links. Aimee Slater, the librarian for the Journalism Program/ Social Sciences, has put together this guide that she has designed specifically for journalism students.

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Contact Information: 

We in the journalism program would like to hear from you. Reach out to us at:

Neil Swidey, program director: neilswidey@brandeis.edu

Sybil Schlesinger, administrator: sybilsch@brandeis.edu

Rachel Raczka, assistant director for internships & outreach: rachelraczka@brandeis.edu

Aimee Slater, journalism librarian: aslater@brandeis.edu

Jen Crystal, journalism UDR: jennifercrystal@brandeis.edu

Anna Nappi, journalism UDR: annanappi@brandeis.edu

Noah Zeitlin, journalism media producer: nzeitlin@brandeis.edu 

If you have a journalism event or opportunity that you’d like us to promote through this newsletter or our other channels, please email us at jennifercrystal@brandeis.edu or annanapppi@brandeis.edu

Best, 

Jen Crystal and Anna Nappi

--

She/her/hers

Journalism UDRs

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Spring 2021 Journalism News 

A roundup of news from the Journalism Program, compiled by Anna Nappi, Journalism UDR.

New Journalism Courses Planned for the Fall

The Journalism Program will offer an array of great courses for the fall semester, mixing both popular established classes and new offerings and instructors. Among the new courses will be JOUR 114B: Arts Journalism, Pop Culture and Digital Innovation as well a new version of JOUR 120A: the Culture of Journalism course, reimagined to include an examination of the generational and identity issues that are being hotly debated in many newsrooms today. Professor Eileen McNamara will once again teach JOUR 110B: Ethics in Journalism and JOUR 145A: Opinion Writing. Professor Neil Swidey will be offering JOUR 113A: Long-form Storytelling for Magazines and Podcasts, a course he introduced last fall. And Professor Mark Dellelo will be offering his two-credit, hands-on lab course JOUR 13A: Multimedia Storytelling. In addition, any students doing a summer internship in journalism should plan to enroll this fall in JOUR 89A: Contemporary Media Internship and Analysis, so their internship can be counted toward their minor requirements.

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Notable Speakers Join Brandeis Journalism Classes

The Journalism Program welcomed a raft of notable speakers this semester who sparked fascinating, provocative discussions. The highest-profile event was the March forum on science journalism and the pandemic, which featured Drs. Anthony Fauci, Elisabeth Rosenthal and Atul Gawande and set a Brandeis webinar record by attracting upwards of 4,000 people. (More on that below.) In addition, this spring many other leading journalists joined Brandeis journalism courses led by Professors Ann Silvio and Neil Swidey, engaging their students in wide-ranging, inspiring discussions. Here are some highlights from those visits, as written by members of the journalism classes.

Swati Sharma: Find Your Why

By Gavi Klein

“Try to figure out why you’re doing what you’re doing,” Swati Sharma told the students in Neil Swidey’s Reinventing Journalism for the 21st Century course on March 16. “If you figure that out, it’ll guide you in all of the hurdles and decisions you have to make.” This was the life-changing career advice that Sharma, the new editor-in-chief of Vox, discovered for herself years ago. That advice has shaped her career ever since. Sharma began her journey studying politics, not intending to go into journalism at all. But a couple of college internships changed that, she began to pursue work as a journalist in full force. She quickly climbed the ladder, moving from The Boston Globe to The Washington Post to The Atlantic, where she served as managing editor, before being named editor-in-chief of Vox, a leading network of explanatory journalism. Sharma described her “why” as the belief that ignorance is the cause for most of society’s evils. Her work in journalism, accordingly, aims to shed light on issues many are ignorant of and thus reach a wide range of people in a powerful, lasting way.

Allissa Richardson: Never Stop Writing

By Noah Zeitlin

Dr. Allissa Richardson — author of Bearing Witness While Black: Smartphones, African Americans, and the New Protest #Journalism gave her advice for forging a successful but balanced journalism career. During her talk with students in the Reinventing Journalism course on April 8, Richardson advised students to find purpose in their writing, and to lean into it even in the face of racial violence and other trauma. “Never stop writing,” she said. It can be extremely therapeutic. “If you write it down,” she said, “you only have to say it once.” She also recommended checking in “on your strong friends.” Even if they appear to be doing fine, they may well be hurting and in need of support. She said the burdens of trauma can be especially heavy for journalists of color, and she encouraged journalists to pay attention to their own mental health. Richardson, an assistant professor at the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, is writing a new book called, Canceled: How Smartphones and Social Media Democratized Public Shaming.

Alvin Chang: Make It Understandable to Your Mom

By Dara Goldfein

“I was really interested in helping communicate how really complicated things work” Alvin Chang, The Guardian’s senior data reporter, told students in the Reinventing Journalism course. Chang found his speciality in data visualization through a long, winding path in journalism, beginning with a job writing about hockey for ESPN. Although he didn’t come into the job knowing much about hockey, he learned how to use data to distinguish his work. Through his stints in various newsrooms, a passion emerged: communicating complicated ideas simply. Chang, who previously worked at Vox producing viral explainer videos, constructs his work by imagining his audience. “I often think about my mom … what can I do to get her to understand things that are relatively complex?” Chang said. He said he wants to make information accessible, and he knows it can be.

Akilah Johnson: Find Your Superpower

By Nicolas St Cloud

Growing up, Akilah Johnson thought she wanted to study STEM but discovered relatively late her aptitude for writing. While her journey to becoming a respected journalist might seem natural, she explained to Professor Neil Swidey’s Science Journalism and the Pandemic course, she has actually traveled a nonlinear path. Johnson is now a national reporter at The Washington Post, covering health disparities at the intersection of race, medicine, politics and immigration. Johnson said she hopes readers walk away from her articles feeling challenged and having learned something new. She advises future journalists to know their “superpower,” and she recounted how she used her knowledge of hip-hop music and the Miami club scene to make herself invaluable to more experienced colleagues in her first newsroom job as a low-ranking editorial assistant. She encouraged students to avoid limiting themselves to one specific beat or title, urging them to explore diverse topics and uncover truths about under-explored issues. “Everyone should feel comfortable making a left turn in their path,” she said, “because they will end up at the right place eventually.”

Lisa Tuite: Dig Into Databases

By Claire Kiewra

For a group of journalism students, Lisa Tuite offers the ultimate insight into finding the facts that blossom into important news stories. Tuite worked at The Boston Globe library for nearly four decades, heading the department for 25 of those years. In her talk with Brandeis students in both of Neil Swidey’s courses on Feb. 23, Tuite discussed the importance of research in journalism and how to implement different research tools. While a Google search may be a great jumping-off point to a story, Tuite recommends premium databases like Nexis Uni, which Brandeis students have free access to. She walked students through the process of conducting productive database searches, and she reminded them that, even in our digital age, there is still great value in real-world archives. She put her research prowess to work on many of the Globe’s highest-profile projects over the years, most notably the Spotlight investigation into clergy sex abuse. And she discussed the surreal nature of seeing an actress play her in the Academy Award-winning movie Spotlight.

Ann Scales: Lean Into Listening

By Emerson White

In life and in the field of journalism, listening is essential to learning, Ann Scales told Brandeis journalism students in the Science Journalism and the Pandemic course on Feb. 18. Scales is a former Boston Globe editor and Washington correspondent who is now the Director of Media Relations for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. She has served as the director for several years, but her role shifted tremendously in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic as the messages she gave the public became more urgent than ever. Scales told students, whether you are a journalist or a scientist, you must make things comprehensible, and you must be interested in what people have to say. In all aspects of life, you will benefit from caring about other human beings and the stories they have to tell you. “You listen,” she said, “and you tell the truth.”

Gabrielle Schonder: The Importance of Truth

In March, Emmy-award winning news producer Gabrielle Schonder led a discussion with students in Ann Silvio’s course Truth, Fact and Research in Journalism. Schonder discussed her recent Frontline documentary “American Carnage,” the inside story of how Trump's presidency laid the groundwork for an insurrection at the US Capitol. Students also studied Schonder's raw interviews with political figures like Kellyanne Conway and Steve Bannon to understand her strategies for finding the truth in political interviews with public figures. The class considered the merits of Frontline's transparency project, an effort to provide viewers with interactive raw transcripts (such as Schonder's interview with Central Park Five defendant Yusef Salaam). Students engaged in a discussion of adversarial broadcast interviews with a focus on Schonder's groundbreaking report “Insiders,” a 60 Minutes investigation of members of Congress who trade on insider information. The story was referenced by President Obama in his 2012 State of the Union speech and resulted in a bipartisan bill called The STOCK Act.

Amina Manzoor: The Real Swedish Experiment

By Roshni Ray

More than a year into the Covid-19 pandemic, countries around the world have implemented different measures to combat the spread of the virus. Swedish journalist Amina Manzoor spoke to students in the Science Journalism and the Pandemic class about Sweden’s seemingly more relaxed response to the pandemic, referred to as “the Swedish Experiment.” Manzoor discussed both the fallout from Sweden’s approach and the distorted reporting about it. Mostly lost in the coverage, she pointed out, was the fact that Swedish public health authorities worked to protect older, more vulnerable residents. If the government’s main goal truly had been to achieve herd immunity, she said, they wouldn’t have enacted protections for the elderly. She also discussed how the spread of disinformation through a private Swedish Facebook group called the Mewas decreased public confidence in the government’s public health advice. From her experience in science reporting and her expertise on pandemics, Manzoor stressed that “in every story, [one] has to explain what is uncertain...People want information.” Manzoor, who is now a medical columnist for the Swedish newspaper Expressen, is working on a book that synthesizes her insights about the pandemic.

Anne Barnard: Be Diligent and Compassionate

In March, New York Times correspondent Anne Barnard visited the Truth, Fact and Research in Journalism course. Barnard led coverage of the war in Syria for six years as the Beirut bureau chief before moving onto coverage of the environment and the impact of climate change. At Brandeis, she discussed the best practices for accuracy as a foreign correspondent based on her decades of reporting from Russia, Iraq, Afghanistan, Lebanon and Syria. Students prepared by reading Barnard's work as well as stories by her colleague, the late Anthony Shadid, who was known for his compassionate and diligent reporting practices. Examples of her work include her articles, “From Syrian Rubble to German Concert Halls With a Piano, a Mission and Survivor’s Guilt” and “Inside Syria’s Secret Torture Prisons: How Bashar al-Assad Crushed Dissent.”

Anne Kornblut: Lean on Your Curiosity

By Maddy DuLong

Whether working in old media or new media, Anne Korblut told students, let curiosity be your guide. Kornblut, the Vice President of Global Curation for Facebook, spoke to Neil Swidey’s Reinventing Journalism class on March 23. After getting to know the students a bit and polling them about their media consumption, Kornblut described her journey, from a breaking news reporter at the New York Daily News covering tragedy and mayhem, to the deputy national editor for The Washington Post working on high-profile investigations, to her current position at Facebook. She emphasized the importance of local news as the lifeblood of communities, and she described her work at Facebook to help support small news outlets. She also discussed the challenges of trying to root out misinformation. Kornblut advised students interested in journalism to familiarize themselves with the business and technological sides of the profession. They don’t have to become expert coders, she said, but they should try to learn enough about coding so they can talk intelligently with the techies they’ll be working with. Because the media world is changing so rapidly, it will be essential for journalists to have the multifaceted skills to adapt.

Jacob Feldman: Find Yourself a Niche

By Ellis Zehnder

“Look for the gaps. Find the things your friends don’t want you to talk about – then write about that.” That was the advice of sports journalist, longform newsletter editor and podcaster Jacob Feldman, who spoke in April to the Reinventing Journalism class. Feldman began his journalism career as a fact-checker at Sports Illustrated, though he quickly moved into a full writing role. Then, when the magazine started a weekly NFL newsletter, Feldman leveraged his experience running newsletters in college into taking charge. Feldman, who covers the intersection of sports, tech and media for Sportico, says he’s still a passionate sports fan. It’s just that now it’s mostly for sports he doesn’t cover – for example, he recently fell deep into the world of curling. Much of the talk focused on Feldman’s other role as editor and cofounder of the weekly newsletter the Sunday Long Read. That all came about when he was still a senior in college and connected with noted journalist Don Van Natta Jr. over Twitter, answering Van Natta’s call for someone who had experience producing newsletters. Since then, the Sunday Long Read has become an important aggregator and curator of long-form journalism, but Feldman says that persuading people to want to read long form isn’t his goal. Instead, he said he focuses on helping those who already want to read long pieces but are blocked by the barrier to entry. “The internet’s a big place” he said, “you don’t need to convince a million people.” In the Sunday Long Read, he helped Van Natta find a gap and they filled it, and turned that into success. He encouraged students to find their own niche. “What do you wish you could read more of?” he asked. That’s where you should start.

Patricia Wen: All Journalists Are Investigative Reporters

By Addison Antonoff

Patricia Wen, editor for the Boston Globe’s Spotlight Team, joined Neil Swidey’s Science Journalism and the Pandemic class in April to discuss how to cover complex medical stories with care, rigor and humanity. “You don’t just write a story because it’s titillating or fascinating or whatever, it’s for the public good,” Wen told the class. She and Swidey discussed a series they wrote together about what can happen when doctors working at the frontier of medicine disagree about a diagnosis. The story, about a teenager named Justina Pelletier, revealed how dramatically these medical disagreements can escalate, in this case leading to a custody battle pitting the girl’s parents against Boston Children’s Hospital and the state child welfare system. As an editor for the Spotlight Team, Wen offered much of her advice to students from the vantage point of investigative journalism. And yet, she said, “The truth is all journalists are investigative reporters.” She stressed the importance of balancing aggressive curiosity with the forethought to check one’s own biases. “At the end of the day, your goal is to tell the truth as best you can see it.”

Kate Nocera: Delete All Your Tweets

By Jolie Newman

“My best advice to you is delete all your tweets,” Kate Nocera, news desk editor for Axios and former Washington Bureau chief for Buzzfeed News, told students in the Reinventing Journalism course on April 1. Asked whether social media has had a positive or negative impact on journalism, Nocera said that while she initially thought that social media had a positive impact, years of working in the field convinced her of the latter. “Normally humans make mistakes, and if you make a mistake on the internet, it’s forever and people won’t let you forget,” Nocera said. When Nocera spoke about journalism trends, she mentioned the power of the Trump phenomenon in attracting attention for journalists. With Trump gone, she said, journalism sites are seeing a dramatic decrease in traffic. “Journalists were riding high for four years,” Nocera said. “That’s not a joke when Donald Trump said ‘I’m really good for you.’ It was true; he was good for a lot of individual journalists, and he was good for the industry.” But, she said, that's not the same as being good for our democracy.

Richard Young: Science is Dynamic

By Nikki Dagen

Science isn’t absolute, but that doesn’t mean it’s untrustworthy. Dr. Richard Young discussed the challenges underlying such uncertainty with the Science Journalism and the Pandemic class on April 22. Young is a noted geneticist, a professor of biology at MIT, and a member of the Whitehead Institute. He has served as an advisor to the World Health Organization and National Institutes of Health. Young said that questions in science are continually being reframed to produce more complex answers, which has taught him to be wary of making definitive statements prematurely. He said there is often a “neglected point of view” or alternative hypothesis that can call previous conclusions into question. “One of the things you discover as you get older and more experienced is that things you passionately believed were true are called into question with more data -- more often than you wish,” he said. This dynamism excites Young; it shows the scientific method at work.

JP Olsen: Focus on Your Ability and Sensibility

JP Olsen, most recently the Director of Original Programming at HBO, discussed innovation in journalism with the Reinventing Journalism class on April 22. With an eclectic career as an award-winning documentary filmmaker, reporter, composer and journalism instructor, Olsen advised students to first focus on their ability to tell a story well, using the tools at their disposal. But he stressed that journalists really distinguish themselves with their sensibility. He encouraged the students to hone their taste, reading widely, consuming a variety of sources, and being invested in the world. (Or as he put it: “Be part of the I Care Club.”) Asked if people respond to documentaries differently from written news stories, Olsen pointed out that “visual mediums run hotter than print.” A documentary showing the melting of the polar ice caps, he said, would typically be more effective than a written story, because you can show them melting. That said, he added, “print is the superior medium for nuanced thinking.” That’s why he is a fan, consumer and producer of both forms.

Blaine Harden: Be More Informed about Trauma

After years of reporting on the dystopian North Korea regime, journalist Blaine Harden published Escape from Camp 14. To his surprise, the book became a global sensation. It was the gripping story of Shin Dong-hyuk, the only person born in a North Korean prison camp to escape to the West. Shin shot to fame, and his testimony helped launch a United Nations inquiry of North Korea's crimes against humanity. Then, in 2015, Shin recanted parts of his story, admitting to Harden in a tense phone call that he'd lied. "As his biographer, it was a stomach-wrenching revelation," Harden wrote at the time. The whole ordeal changed him, Harden told students during an April visit to Ann Silvio's Truth, Fact, and Research in Journalism class -- both as a journalist and as a human being. What he came to understand is that the field of journalism needs a more informed perspective on the psychological impacts of profound trauma, and how best to report on the often-disjointed accounts of victims.

Anthony Fauci, Elisabeth Rosenthal and Atul Gawande: How Science Journalism Can Help Win the “Tug of War”

By Anna Nappi

Dr. Anthony Fauci, chief medical advisor to the President, stressed that knowledgeable reporting allows people to “self-correct” when they are going down the “wrong path,” as it gives readers a new way of seeing the truth. He was joined by Dr. Atul Gawande and Dr. Elisabeth Rosenthal for a Brandeis virtual discussion in March moderated by the journalism program director, Neil Swidey. Dr. Gawande, a surgeon at Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Harvard professor and New Yorker staff writer, spoke about all the good that science journalism has done during the pandemic but said he regretted that the field had been largely “impotent” in stopping the spread of misinformation and disinformation. He shared with the audience a multi-part test for how news consumers can detect pseudoscience. Dr. Rosenthal, the editor-in-chief of Kaiser Health News and a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times, described the dangers to the pandemic response (and our democracy) posed by news deserts — vast swaths of the country that now lack reputable local news outlets. She said Kaiser Health News is working to help bolster local news through its pandemic coverage partnerships. Dr. Fauci emotionally described the sting of seeing anti-science advocates use the government’s shift in guidance on face masks as a way to discredit public guidance overall — he called it “one of the most painful things that I have gone through this past year.” Fauci described the battle between science and anti-science this way: “It’s kind of like a tug of war. Who’s going to win that tug of war?” In addition to drawing a record audience, the webinar attracted a good deal of media coverage. For the full recording of the webinar, go to the Brandeis Journalism events page. For a sampling of media coverage see the Boston Globe as well as Brandeis Now and the Justice.

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How to Declare a Minor

If taking a journalism course or two has sparked your interest in declaring a minor in journalism, the process is straight-forward. Take a look at the requirements, and then email this completed worksheet to Program Director Neil Swidey (neilswidey@brandeis.edu). He will then schedule a time to meet with you. Please remember to include your Sage ID on the worksheet.

Follow Our New Social Media Accounts

Please consider following one or more of the Brandeis Journalism Program’s new accounts, on the social media platform of your choice: Instagram (@BrandeisJournalism), Twitter (@BrandeisJOUR) and Facebook (@BrandeisUniversityJournalism)! Stay connected to learn more about some great new courses and events we are planning.

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Internships, Scholarships & Opportunities:

Summer Internships: A reminder that any journalism minors who plan to do an internship this summer as part of their requirements for the minor should plan to register for JOUR 89A in the Fall. That seminar is required for fulfilling the internship for the minor.

  • The Panorama Project: This student-led initiative is accepting applications from those who are interested in collaborating on works of journalism that explore topics in U.S. politics and history. You can find more information on their website, or by reaching out to Ishmael Maxwell with any questions at ishmael@thepanoproject.com.

  • SIMS Lab: The Sound and Image Media Studio at Brandeis is currently looking to hire a support and training specialist for the 2021-2022 academic year with an option to begin over the summer. The application and more details are available here on Workday. Speaking of SIMS, check out this article.

  • The Association of LGBTQ Journalists: The inaugural spring conference is taking place from June 25-26 and will feature opportunities for students to learn from industry experts, connect with fellow student journalists, and explore the intersections of the media world and LGBTQ identities. More information can be found on their website.

  • Campus media: Student journalism clubs provide an ideal way to get involved in journalism while also getting to understand the Brandeis community in a deeper way. Both The Justice newspaper and The Hoot welcome writers, photographers and cartoonists of all skill levels for their variety of sections. The Justice is also creating a podcast. If you’d like to get involved with the podcast, reach out to news@thejustice.org, other Justice related inquiries should go to editor@thejustice.org. To get involved with The Hoot, email eic@thebrandeishoot.com.

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Resources:

Media Access: As a Brandeis student, you have free access through our library to many newspapers and magazines, even if those publications have paywalls that make their content open only to subscribers. Here's a handy guide with links. Aimee Slater, the librarian for the Journalism Program/ Social Sciences, has put together this guide that she has designed specifically for journalism students.

Contact Information:

We in the Journalism Program would like hear from you. Reach out to us at:

If you have an event or opportunity relating to journalism that you’d like us to promote through this newsletter or our other channels, or if I can be helpful in any other way, please email me at annanappi@brandeis.edu. Hope you all have an enjoyable rest of your week.

Best,

Anna Nappi

She/her/hers

Journalism UDR

________________________________

February 2021 Journalism News 

Science Journalism & the Pandemic: A Brandeis Forum with Dr. Fauci

Wednesday, March 3, from 3-4 p.m. ET

More than 5,000 people have already registered for this Journalism Program webinar on Wednesday, March 3, that will feature Drs. Anthony Fauci, Atul Gawande and Elisabeth Rosenthal. But there’s still time for you to register if you’d like to join. Dr. Fauci, who is President Biden’s Chief Medical Advisor, will be joined in conversation with Dr. Gawande, a staff writer for The New Yorker, Harvard professor, and surgeon at Brigham & Women's Hospital, as well as Dr. Rosenthal, a former emergency room physician and longtime New York Times writer who is now editor-in-chief of Kaiser Health News. The all-star panel will delve into the news media’s role in the public health fight against COVID-19 – and the forces of disinformation interfering with it. The forum will feature an introduction by President Ron Liebowitz and be moderated by Professor Neil Swidey, the director of the Brandeis Journalism Program. Swidey is teaching a new course this semester called Science Journalism, the Pandemic, and Disinformation. The March 3 event is free and open to all who register. You can sign up for it here.

Notable Speakers Join Brandeis Journalism Classes

The Journalism Program has welcomed some notable guest speakers to classes this semester, with many more to come. The previously mentioned Science Journalism course recently hosted Ann Scales, a former White House correspondent and newsroom editor who is now the Director of Media Relations for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. And Neil Swidey’s Reinventing Journalism course hosted a visit from Alvin Chang, a leader in data visualization for The Guardian. On Tuesday, March 2, that course will host Swati Sharma, the newly named editor-in-chief of Vox Media who was most recently managing editor of The Atlantic. Anyone interested in joining Sharma’s classroom talk should email nfritzon@brandeis.edu for link info.

In addition, Lisa Tuite, the longtime The Boston Globe head librarian who played a key behind-the-scenes role in the investigation depicted in the movie Spotlight, spoke to students in both of Swidey’s courses about the research and fact-checking process. She stressed that they have a wealth of free resources available through the Brandeis Library, especially the powerful database favored by journalists, Nexis Uni. Students can find that database here.

Session Planned for Grants and Research Opportunities for Students

Thursday, March 4, at 3:30 p.m.

Curious about how to fund your research as a scholar? Confused about what grants are and how to get them? Not sure where to start looking for funding? Check out this panel discussion about grants and research funding for scholars and graduate and undergraduate students! You can sign up here.  

Fuenta Latina Talk

If you missed the webinar about Israel and Latina entrepreneurship earlier this month, a recording of it is now live on the web. This event addressed the entrepreneurial and journalistic aspect of Fuente Latina’s mission to bring Israeli news coverage to a global Hispanic audience, and explored Leah Soibel’s role as a Latina entrepreneur and the organization's women-centered journalism programs. Cosponsored by the Journalism Program, it also featured journalist, author and Emerson professor Susanne Althoff. The recording is available here

Follow Our New Social Media Accounts 

Please consider following one or more of the Brandeis Journalism Program’s new accounts, on the social media platform of your choice: Instagram (@BrandeisJournalism), Twitter (@BrandeisJOUR) and Facebook (@BrandeisUniversityJournalism)! Stay connected to learn more about some great new courses and events we are planning.

Internships, Scholarships & Opportunities:

Summer Internships: We know many students have begun the process of trying to secure a summer internship in journalism. We also know that, because of the pandemic, the internship landscape is more uncertain than ever. While we hope next year to expand our resources in the Journalism Program for offering internship guidance, the first step is to make an appointment with the Hiatt Career Center for tips and resources, such as using Handshake and LinkedIn. In addition, here is some advice from Professor Maura Jane Farrelly, the chair of American Studies who previously ran the Journalism Program: 

  1. Think about where you plan to be for the summer.  Will you be in the Boston area? At home? Are you able to stay with a relative in another city?
  2. Think about what sort of news organization you are most interested in learning more about.  If you know nothing at all about the broadcast news industry -- and have never once played around with some of the digital editing software used by that industry -- broadcast may not be the right pick for you just yet.  So consider what you want to learn and what you bring to the table.
  3. Then get to work.  I always put a lot of the responsibility for finding internships on the students themselves because finding the right people to talk to, and contacting them out of the blue, is an essential skill in journalism!
  4. I have always felt that smaller publications are better, especially at first.  Because smaller news organizations tend to be woefully understaffed, if you're good, you might get something published with your own byline by the end of the summer. So identify all the newspapers or radio stations or news websites in the area where you’ll be. Some of them may have formal internship programs, so you'll have all the directions you need to apply.  But odds are many of them will not have formal internship programs.  No problem!  Find out who the news director or news editor is (again -- this is the kind of digging you'll have to do if you're going to be a reporter).  Get that person's email address.  Send him or her an email, telling that person who you are; what skills you have; what you want to learn; why you are capable of learning it; and why you believe that outlet would be a great fit for you. And then ask if they'd be willing to let you intern with the organization for the summer. All of us in the Journalism Program are here to help.

UDR Application: Our selected Undergraduate Department Representatives would gain a leadership position as peer advisors to our students with the aim of strengthening their learning experience and community in the department. We currently have one UDR position available. Applications are due March 1 and can be submitted here to the online UDR application.

Resources:

Aimee Slater, the librarian for the Journalism Program/ Social Sciences, has put together this guide that she has designed specifically for journalism students. 

Contact Information:

We in the Journalism Program would like hear from you. Reach out to us at:

If you have an event or opportunity relating to journalism that you’d like us to promote through this newsletter or our other channels, or if I can be helpful in any other way, please email me at jennifercrystal@brandeis.edu. Hope you all have an enjoyable rest of your week.

Best,

Jen Crystal

She/her/hers

Journalism UDR

_________________________

January 2021 Journalism News 

A monthly roundup of news from the Journalism Program, written by Jen Crystal, Journalism UDR.

Science Journalism & the Pandemic: A Brandeis Forum with Dr. Fauci

Wednesday, March 3, from 3-4 p.m. ET

What is the best way to communicate real science in the age of fake news? What role should news media organizations play in the nation’s fight against COVID-19? Where is the line between journalism and public health?photograph of Dr. Anthony Fauci Join us for this Brandeis Journalism Program webinar featuring leading figures in public health and science and medical journalism. Dr. Anthony Fauci, named by President-elect Biden to be his Chief Medical Advisor on COVID-19, will be joined in conversation with Dr. Atul Gawande, a staff writer for The New Yorker, Harvard professor, and surgeon at Brigham & Women's Hospital, as well as Dr. Elisabeth Rosenthal, a former emergency room physician and longtime New York Times writer who is now editor-in-chief of Kaiser Health News. The notable panelists will delve into the news media’s role in the public health fight against COVID – and the forces of disinformation interfering with it. The forum, which will feature an introduction by President Ron Liebowitz, is being held in conjunction with Professor Neil Swidey's new Spring 2021 course JOUR 130b: Science Journalism, the Pandemic, and Disinformation. The March 3 event is free and open to all who register. You can sign up for it here.

Israel and Latina Entrepreneurship in the Spanish-speaking Media

Thursday, Feb. 4, from 7- 8 p.m. ET

Explore women-led entrepreneurialism in the media through the lens of Fuente Latina, an organization whose stated mission is to deepen coverage of Israel and the Mideast in Spanish-language media around the world. Journalist and Emerson professor Susanne Althoff, author of the new book Launching While Female, will join in conversation with Leah Soibel, founder and CEO of Fuente Latina, as they discuss Latina entrepreneurship and the organization's women-centered journalism programs. It is sponsored by the Brandeis HBI Project in Latin American Jewish & Gender Studies, and cosponsored by the Journalism Program. Register for the free event here.

Student Spotlight 

We’ve added a new Student Spotlight feature to our website to highlight the great work being done by journalism students. Check it out to take in a powerful podcast about Black Lives Matter by first-year student Lesedi Lerato Mataboge and an inviting photo essay by student Vincente Cayuela, which highlights how fine arts students and faculty are adapting to the pandemic. If you have recommendations for student work to be spotlighted in the future, please let us know. You can find Lesedi’s podcast and Vincente’s photo essay here.

Reminder: New Spring Journalism Courses

The Journalism Program is offering a pair of exciting new courses for the Spring semester, designed to shed important light on pressing issues facing the country. The first will examine the concept of journalistic truth through immersion into research, fact-checking and the art of the interview. It will be taught by Ann Silvio, who, as managing editor/digital for the CBS News program 60 Minutes, created and hosted the program 60 Minutes Overtime, interviewing the likes of Oprah Winfrey and Anderson Cooper. That course is JOUR 152a and it is offered in the 1C block. Photograph of Ann Silvio Interviewing Oprah Winfrey

The other new course is the one on science journalism mentioned above. Taught by Neil Swidey, the new Director of the Journalism Program, the course will be offered in the 2B block. 

 

Cross-listing News  

The Journalism Department is expanding its courses’ cross listings. JOUR113a Longform  Journalism for Magazines and Podcasts, which is offered in the Fall, is now cross-listed with Creative Writing, for students doing the Creative Non-Fiction Track. JOUR 130b Science Journalism is cross-listed with HSSP. More cross-listing announcements to come!

Podcasting Students Featured in Brandeis Video

image of journalism class on ZoomThe students in the Longform Journalism/Podcasting course were recently featured in the Brandeis Behind the Mask video. This video examines how Brandeis has adapted to meet the challenges of COVID-19, with university videographer Tarah Llewellyn making visits to a handful of in-person courses. Pictured: Students participating via Zoom in Professor Swidey's JOUR 113a course.

Follow Our New Social Media Accounts  

Please consider following one or more of the Brandeis Journalism Program’s new accounts, on the social media platform of your choice: Instagram (@BrandeisJournalism), Twitter (@BrandeisJOUR) and Facebook (@BrandeisUniversityJournalism)! Stay connected to learn more about some great new courses and events we are planning.

Internships, Scholarships & Opportunities:

Resources:

As a Brandeis student, you have free access through our library to many newspapers and magazines, even if those publications have paywalls that make their content open only to subscribers. Here's a handy guide with links.   Aimee Slater, the librarian for the Journalism Program/Social Sciences, has put together this guide  that she has put together specifically for Journalism students.

A new documentary, Legacy of a Newsman, focuses on longtime Nebraska TV Newsman Jerry Dishong, as well as the evolution of broadcast media. This film can provide some perspective on what a career in broadcast may look like in its early stages and also some understanding of the history of TV News.  Watch the film on Amazon Prime.

Contact Information:

We in the Journalism Program would like hear from you. Reach out to us at:

If you have an event or opportunity relating to journalism that you’d like us to promote through this newsletter or our other channels, or if I can be helpful in any other way, please email me at jennifercrystal@brandeis.edu. Hope you all have an enjoyable rest of your week.

Best,

Jen Crystal

She/her/hers

Journalism UDR

 ______________________________________

November 2020 Journalism News

New York Times writer, Pulitzer-winning culture critic, and podcast host Wesley Morris to speak at Brandeis Nov. 18

photograph of Wesley Morris

Wesley Morris, the Pulitzer-winning critic at large for the New York Times, contributor to the “1619 Project,” and cohost of the podcast Still Processing, will discuss a wide range of subjects with students at Brandeis on Wednesday, Nov. 18. Sponsored by the Journalism Program, this event will take place on Zoom from 5:30- 7 p.m. Topics will include intersectionality, identity, and Black culture in America, as well as movies, music and other pop culture. Brandeis student panelists for this event will be Monica Keel, Sophie Brill-Weitz, Kwesi Jones, and Lesedi Lerato Mataboge. Cosponsored by AAAS, the Dean of Arts and Sciences, MCS, CAST and AMST, this talk will be free and open to the public. Register here: https://brandeis.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_S0pa8Yl0T2W9sRfuQUEDeQ

New courses for the Spring on the pandemic and disinformation, as well as truth and fact; new instructor from 60 Minutes

Photograph of Ann Silvio hosting 60 Minutes The Journalism Program will be offering a pair of exciting new courses for the Spring semester, designed to shed important light on pressing issues facing the country. The first will examine the concept of journalistic truth through immersion into research, fact-checking and the art of the interview. It will be taught by Ann Silvio, who, as managing editor/digital for the CBS News program 60 Minutes, created and hosted the program 60 Minutes Overtime, interviewing the likes of Oprah Winfrey and Anderson Cooper. That course is JOUR 152a and it is scheduled for the 1C block.  

The other new course will focus on science journalism, the pandemic, and disinformation, exploring the question: What is the best way to communicate real science in the age of fake news? That course, JOUR 130b, which is cross-listed with HSSP, will be taught by Neil Swidey, the new director of the Journalism Program, and is scheduled for the 2B block. 

In addition, we will once again offer a pair of courses on journalism in the last century (JOUR 137b with Eileen McNamara, in Block 1B) and innovation in journalism for the 21st century (JOUR 109b with Neil Swidey, in Block 2E). And we will offer a course exploring the interplay between media and public policy (JOUR 107b with Eileen McNamara, in Block 1D). Finally, we will offer a half-credit multimedia storytelling lab course on Thursday evenings. Taught by Mark Dellelo, this course is especially advised for students planning to take JOUR 109b but who don’t have much experience working with multimedia equipment and editing software.

Bada Bing! Lecturer Mark Dellelo contributes to new Sopranos book

photograph of Dello's book coverJournalism Lecturer Mark Dellelo contributed three chapters to the new book Off the Back of a Truck: Unofficial Contraband for the Sopranos Fan, to be published Dec. 1st by an imprint of Simon & Schuster. The Sopranos, the acclaimed HBO drama that aired from 1999 to 2007, is credited with ushering in the “Peak TV” era of binge-worthy programs -- the forerunner to everything from Breaking Bad to Ozark. Dellelo, who also serves as manager of the Brandeis Sound & Image Media Studios, was invited to contribute to the Sopranos book because of his expertise in the craft in filmmaking. His chapters cover the show’s influence in such areas as music, cinematography and editing. The Sopranos is expected to attract a new generation of fans when a prequel feature film is released next year starring the real-life son of James Gandolfini, the late actor who played Tony Soprano in the HBO show. You can order a copy of the new book here.

Follow Our New Social Media Accounts  

Please consider following one or more of the Brandeis Journalism Program’s new accounts, on the social media platform of your choice: Instagram (@BrandeisJournalism), Twitter (@BrandeisJOUR) and Facebook (@BrandeisUniversityJournalism)! Stay connected to learn more about some great new courses and events we are planning.

Internships, Scholarships & Opportunities:

Resources:

A reminder that, as a Brandeis student, you have free access through our library to many newspapers and magazines, even if those publications have paywalls that make their content open only to subscribers. Here's a handy guide with links.   Specifically for journalism students, Aimee Slater, the librarian for the Journalism Program/ Social Sciences, has put together this guide.

Contact Information:

We in the Journalism Program would like hear from you. Reach out to us at:

If you have an event or opportunity relating to journalism that you’d like us to promote through this newsletter or our other channels, or if I can be helpful in any other way, please email me at jennifercrystal@brandeis.edu. Hope you all have an enjoyable rest of your week.

Best,

Jen Crystal

She/her/hers

Journalism UDR

______________________________________________________________

October 2020 Journalism News 

A monthly roundup of news from the Journalism Program, written by Jen Crystal, Journalism UDR.

Campaign 2020: History in the Making

As the unforgettable 2020 presidential campaign lurches to its close, Brandeis journalism professors Eileen McNamara and Maura Jane Farrelly engaged in this topical discussion on Oct. 14. Since journalism is considered the first rough draft of history, McNamara and Farrelly attempted to offer their very rough draft of this historic race, while also reflecting on how it may be interpreted by future Americans.  You may find a recording of the event here.

Recap of Meet the Minors Night with Alex Goldstein:

Learning to think like a journalist, Alex Goldstein ’06 told students during the Sept. 30 Meet the Minor Night, was crucial to prepare him for success as a political strategist. In the 14 years since he graduated from Brandeis with a journalism minor, Goldstein served for eight years in key leadership roles with former Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick, founded political strategy firm 90 West, and served as the senior communications advisor and spokesman for Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley’s historic and successful campaign for Massachusetts’ 7th Congressional District. More recently, he created @FacesOfCOVID, an initiative using Twitter to catalogue and amplify the stories of the thousands of American lives lost to COVID-19.

Goldstein said his journalism courses at Brandeis, particularly those with Professor McNamara, taught him the skills for “empathetic storytelling,” which have proved invaluable in his political career. They also helped shape his philosophy that the only sensible way to view public policy is through the lens of how it affects people.

To view a recording of this talk, visit the Journalism Department website

Follow Our New Social Media Accounts  

Please consider following one or more of the Brandeis Journalism Program’s new accounts, on the social media platform of your choice: Instagram (@BrandeisJournalism), Twitter (@BrandeisJOUR) and Facebook (@BrandeisUniversityJournalism)! Stay connected to learn more about some great new courses and events we are planning.

Internships, Scholarships & Opportunities:

Resources:

As a Brandeis student, you have free access through our library to many newspapers and magazines, even if those publications have paywalls that make their content open only to subscribers. Here's a handy guide with links.

Aimee Slater, the librarian for the Journalism Program/ Social Sciences, has put together this guide that she has designed specifically for journalism students. 

A coalition of students, staff, and faculty - VOTEDEIS - have joined forces to help members of the Brandeis community vote in November. The VoteDeis Campus Coalition website and Vote.org contain important information to help students, staff and faculty (and their friends and family members) register to vote, check their registration status, and request an absentee ballot. 

Contact Information:

We in the Journalism Program would like hear from you. Reach out to us at:

If you have an event or opportunity relating to journalism that you’d like us to promote through this newsletter or our other channels, or if I can be helpful in any other way, please email me at jennifercrystal@brandeis.edu. Hope you all have an enjoyable rest of your week.

Best,

Jen Crystal

She/her/hers

Journalism UDR

_______________________________________________

September 2020 Journalism News 

Message from the Director

Hello. My name is Neil Swidey, and I am the new director of the Brandeis Journalism Program as well as a professor of the practice. I come to campus having spent many years as a Boston Globe Magazine writer, multimedia journalist, and narrative nonfiction author. (More info.) What drew me to Brandeis was the chance to work with remarkable faculty members and dynamic students to expand and update this program to meet the pressing challenges facing journalism – and our democracy. 

In addition to our roster of returning courses, we’ve added a few options this year. Professor McNamara is teaching her course on political packaging, a treat she offers only during presidential election years. I’m teaching a new course on long-form storytelling for both magazines and podcasts. For the spring, we are planning a new course that will focus on the intersection of science journalism, disinformation and the pandemic.

We’d like your input as we develop additional courses and re-imagine parts of the program. This is true whether you’re a veteran enrolled in your seventh journalism course or have just started your first. Please reach out to me (neilswidey@brandeis.edu) with your thoughts, or pop by Brown 327 (either virtually or in person) on Wednesday mornings for office hours.

We plan to keep you posted about program news and pass along info about internships and other opportunities that might interest you. That’s the idea behind this new newsletter that our wonderful UDR, Jen Crystal (below), will be sending out monthly.

Message from the UDR

My name is Jen Crystal, and I am serving as the 2020 undergraduate representative for the Journalism Program. Amidst all of the craziness of remote learning and unusual academic/extracurricular circumstances, it’s more important than ever to keep the lines of communication open. That’s why I will be sending out these email blasts on a monthly basis.  

As a UDR, I hope to be an approachable and valuable resource for current and prospective journalism students. I want to broaden the communication between the program and students, as well as bring more professional journalists to Brandeis to create meaningful dialogues about journalism in practice. Please, do not hesitate to email me with any questions. (See contact information the bottom of this email.)  

Meet the Minor Night

To feature Ayanna Pressley advisor Alex Goldstein ’06

Are you interested in learning more about what’s involved in minoring in journalism? Curious about what kinds of careers graduates of the Brandeis Journalism Program have pursued? Join us on Wednesday, Sept. 30, at 7 p.m. for our “Meet the Journalism Minor Night” on Zoom, which will feature noted political strategist Alex Goldstein ’06

Many recent Brandeis grads now hold prominent roles in the news media, such as Elizabeth Bruenig A’13, an opinion columnist for The New York Times, and Lydia Emmanouilidou A’14, the Athens bureau chief for Public Radio International’s The World. Other alumni who studied journalism at Brandeis have found rewarding careers in a wide variety of fields, from business to technology to the law.

Alex Goldstein attributes a big part of his success in the political world to learning how to think like a journalist during his time at Brandeis. As the founder and CEO of the political strategy firm 90 West, Goldstein played a leading role in the groundbreaking campaign of Ayanna Pressley, the first woman of color elected to Congress from Massachusetts. He previously served as a senior advisor to Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick, who was the first elected African-American governor in state history – and only the second in US history.

More recently, Goldstein started the Faces of COVID, an ambitious initiative to provide intimate portraits of the thousands of lives lost to the pandemic. (Click here to watch Goldstein’s recent segment on MSNBC about the initiative.)

A captioned recording of this event is now available on the Journalism Program events page 

Opportunities for Students

Mark Your Calendar

Campaign 2020: Yes, Historians Will Be Writing About It

The late publisher of The Washington Post once famously described journalism as the “first rough draft of history.” On the eve of the second presidential debate, join Brandeis journalism professors Eileen McNamara and Maura Jane Farrelly as they attempt to write a very rough draft of the 2020 presidential campaign and how it may be understood by future Americans.
Wednesday, Oct. 14, 8-9 p.m. ET
Register online via Zoom  

Resources

Media Access

As a Brandeis student, you have free access through our library to many newspapers and magazines, even if those publications have paywalls that make their content open only to subscribers. Here's a handy guide with links.

Aimee Slater, the librarian for the Journalism Program/ Social Sciences, has put together this guide that she has designed specifically for journalism students. 

Remote Resources

ITS has created the following resources regarding "Preparing Students for Remote Learning," which you may find useful or may wish to share with students in your majors/minors.  

Get out the Vote

A coalition of students, staff, and faculty - VOTEDEIS - has joined forces to help members of the Brandeis community vote in November. The VoteDeis Campus Coalition website and Vote.org contain important information to help students, staff and faculty (and their friends and family members) register to vote, check their registration status, and request an absentee ballot. 

Connect10n: BCC Online Workshops

A 10-week series of Zoom workshops will focus on how to cope with COVID by connecting better with yourself, with others, and with the world.  Each week’s workshop is offered twice, once during the day and once in the evening (the content is the same in each session). Open to all Brandeis students. To register for one or more workshop(s), go to: https://brandeis.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0pLLtGpljOdjAG1

Contact information

We in the Journalism Program would like hear from you. Reach out to us at:

I wish you all a wonderful start to your semester and am excited to engage with you more! 

Best,

Jen Crystal

She/her/hers

Journalism UDR