Previous Events

Previous major events initiated by the Center include:

The Responsibility to Protect at 10: the Challenge of Protecting the World's Most Vulernable Populations

'Deis Impact- Festival of Social Justice

Richman Distinguished Fellow in Public Life Lecture: How I Got in the Movement: A Civil Rights "Living Legend" Tells His Story - Julian Bond

Joseph B. and Toby Gittler Prize Lecture: Liberation Theology and Social Activism - Rev. Gustavo Gutiérrez

Just Performance: Enacting Justice in the Wake of Violence

9/11 – Reflections Five Years Later        

The Long View

Telling the Story                    

Local Action/Global Impact     

For round-ups of other past events, see our News section or use the "Search" function above to search for a specific event or topic. 

Cosponsorship guidelines 

For information about Ethics Center cosponsorship of your campus event, click here.

Upcoming Events


All events are free and open to the public, except where noted. Starred events (*) are coordinated by the Center. All other events are cosposonsored by the Center. Click here to request Ethics Center funding and/or publicity for your Brandeis campus event.


Click here to view all Sorensen Fellowship events, workshops, support sessions, and deadlines.

Click here to view all 'DEIS Impact events and deadlines.


*Negotiating Meaning: Translating at a War Crimes Tribunalf

dEllen Elias-Bursac, former translator/reviser of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Time: 4:30 pm
Location: Mandel Center for the Humanities Reading Room (303)

In war crimes trials, witnesses testify--through an interpreter--about translated documents tendered as evidence; attorneys argue--through an interpreter--about both the translated documents and the interpreting; and judges adjudicate on interpreted testimony and translated evidence. The translators and interpreters are key to the negotiations over meaning in every trial.

Ellen Elias-Bursac has been translating fiction and non-fiction from Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian for thirty years. Her translation of David Albahari's novel Götz and Meyer was given the ALTA National Translation Award in 2006. She has taught at the Harvard University Slavic Department and worked for six years as a language reviser at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. Her book Translating Evidence and Interpreting Testimony at a War Crimes Tribunal: Working in a Tug-of-War was honored with the Mary Zirin Prize in 2015.

All are welcome. Refreshments will be served.

This event is cosponsored by the Undergraduate Program in Comparative Literature and Culture, the Master of Arts Program in Comparative Humanities (MACH), and the Ethics Center.

RSVP (optional) on Facebook. For more information, please contact ethics@brandeis.edu.


Martha Minow"Bystanders, Upstanders, and Justice": 2015-16 Gittler Prize Award Presentation and Lecture by Martha Minow

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Time: 4:00 pm
Location: Rapaporte Treasure Hall, Goldfarb Library

Bystanders remain silent and passive in the face of bigotry and injustice, while upstanders stand up for their beliefs, even if they are alone. An upstander may speak out publicly against bigotry and injustice, express support for victims, or even physically rescue. All of these acts expose the upstander to danger – risking personal safety or perhaps just disapproval or costs of time, money and emotion. So why would anyone ever stand up?

Martha Minow is dean of Harvard Law School and one of the world’s leading figures in bringing legal ideas and scholarship to bear on issues of identity, race and equality, including innovative approaches to reconciliation among divided peoples. Minow’s numerous works include “Between Vengeance and Forgiveness: Facing History After Genocide and Mass Violence,” a groundbreaking book offering pathways of hope for divided societies. 

The Joseph B. and Toby Gittler Prize was created by the late Professor Joseph B. Gittler to recognize outstanding and lasting scholarly contributions to racial, ethnic and/or religious relations. The Joseph B. and Toby Gittler Endowed Fund at Brandeis University supports this annual award.

For more information, contact ethics@brandeis.edu


fCitizenship and the Economy: Labor, Inequality, and Bigness

Monday, March 7, 2016

Time: 4:00 pm
Location: Rapaporte Treasure Hall, Goldfarb Library
Introduction: Marty Krauss '81, Brandeis University
Moderator: Daniel Terris, Brandeis University
  • Richard Adelstein, Wesleyan University
  • Alexis Goldstein, Other98.org
  • Jeffrey Rosen,The National Constitution Center, The George Washington University

Commentator: Elizabeth Brainerd, Brandeis University

Original essays by the speakers on Louis Brandeis and his legacy can be found here.

A program of Louis D. Brandeis 100: Then and Now.


fPrivacy, Technology and the Modern Self

Monday, March 21, 2016

Time: 4:00 pm
Location: Rapaporte Treasure Hall, Goldfarb Library
Introduction: Bruce R. Magid, Brandeis University
Moderator: Dan Breen, Brandeis University
  • Anita L. Allen, University of Pennsylvania
  • Shane Harris, The Daily Beast
  • Steven A. Mirmina '89, NASA Office of the General Counsel, Georgetown University Law School
Commentator: Marion Smiley, Brandeis University
Original essays by the speakers on Louis Brandeis and his legacy can be found here.
A program of Louis D. Brandeis 100: Then and Now.

Gates2015-16 Richman Fellowship Residency: Theaster Gates

Monday-Thursday, March 21-24, 2016

Named one of the hundred most important people in the art world by ArtReview and "Innovator of the Year" by the Wall Street Journal, Theaster Gates is a multimedia artist, activist, social engineer, curator, cultural entrepreneur and esteemed member of the elite global art world. His message that art and creativity are engines for attacking poverty, revitalizing neighborhoods and providing opportunity is motivated by a strong social justice agenda.

The Richman Fellowship
will bring Gates to Brandeis from March 21 through March 24, including a public talk on Wednesday, March 23.

For more information, please contact ethics@brandeis.edu

fJewish Justices and the Expanding Diversity of the Supreme Court

Monday, April 4, 2016

Time: 4:00 pm
Location: Rapaporte Treasure Hall, Goldfarb Library

Introduction: Susan J. Birren, Brandeis University
Moderator: Jonathan Sarna '75, MA '75, Brandeis University
  • David Dalin Ph.D. '77, Ave Maria University
  • Linda Greene, University of Wisconsin-Madison Law School
Commentator: Rajesh Sampath, Brandeis University
Original essays by the speakers on Louis Brandeis and his legacy can be found here.

A program of Louis D. Brandeis 100: Then and Now.

fSpeech and Participation in a Democracy: What are the Rights and Responsibilities of the Educated Citizen?

Monday, April 18, 2016

Time: 4:00 pm
Location: Rapaporte Treasure Hall, Goldfarb Library

Introduction: Irving R. Epstein, Brandeis University
Moderator: Stephen Whitfield Ph.D. '72, Brandeis University
  • Leslie Kendrick, University of Virginia School of Law
  • Jon D. Levy, United States District Court for the District of Maine
  • Philippa Strum '59, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
Commentator: Anita Hill, Brandeis University
Original essays by the speakers on Louis Brandeis and his legacy can be found here.

A program of Louis D. Brandeis 100: Then and Now.

IP StudentThe Immigrant Experience. Our Experience.

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Time: 1:00 – 1:50 pm
Location: Lurias, Hassenfeld (upper Sherman)

What’s it like for immigrants who live in Waltham? What’s it like for Brandeis students who work with them? Join the students in the practicum “The Immigrant Experience in Waltham”, taught by Marci McPhee, as the students share what they learned from a semester working with Charles River Public Internet Center, Prospect Hill Community Center, Waltham Family School, or WATCH. Refreshments served. Cosponsored by the Office of Experiential Learning and Teaching.

For more information, please contact ethics@brandeis.edu.