Errol Morris

morris115.jpg

Errol Morris

Errol Morris' documentary films are renowned for new ideas about how to tell nonfiction stories.

"The Fog of War," a profile of former Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, received the 2003 Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature. "Standard Operating Procedure," which won the Silver Bear at the Berlin Film Festival, examined the abuse by U.S. soldiers of Iraqi detainees at Abu Ghraib prison in Baghdad. Mr. Morris himself feels the single most important work he has done was his effort to free an innocent man from prison, a result of his film "The Thin Blue Line."

Mr. Morris is the originator of a unique interviewing machine, the Interrotron. A system of modified teleprompters, the Interrotron allows interviewees to address Mr. Morris' image on the monitor while looking directly into the lens of the camera, which gives Mr. Morris and the audience the impression of achieving eye contact with the subjects. He is the author of "Believing Is Seeing: Observations on the Mysteries of Photography," which will be published this fall. He also has an online column in The New York Times. He has received MacArthur and Guggenheim fellowships. His newest film, "Tabloid," will be released in July 2011.

Honorary Degree Citation

Author, storyteller, acclaimed filmmaker. Your documentary films are renowned for new ideas about how to tell powerful and compelling nonfiction stories. “The Fog of War,” a profile of former Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, received the 2003 Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature. “Standard Operating Procedure,” which won the Silver Bear at the Berlin Film Festival, examined abuse of Iraqi detainees by U.S. soldiers in Baghdad’s Abu Ghraib prison. By means of your film “The Thin Blue Line,” you helped to free an innocent man from prison. You are the inventor of the Interrotron, which allows interviewees to address your image on a monitor, while looking directly at the camera lens, giving you and the audience the impression of eye contact with the subjects. You are author of “Believing Is Seeing: Observations on the Mysteries of Photography,” to be published this fall, and you write an online column in The New York Times. You have received MacArthur and Guggenheim Fellowships. Your latest film, “Tabloid,” will be released this summer.

For your creativity, pursuit of truth and power as a cinematic storyteller, Brandeis University is proud to bestow upon you its highest honor.