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The Detective Novel


The Detective Novel

A Novel Murder: The Life and Times of the Detective Story (S55)
By Susan Solomon Forbes
Professor of American Studies (retired)

The mystery novel permits the serious reader to study basic issues, such as moral codes, the relationship between the individual (criminal, detective, victim) and society, and concepts of law and justice. Stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, Dorothy Sayers, Agatha Christie, Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, Mickey Spillane, John le Carré and others are discussed.

More Different Dicks: Offbeat Contemporary Detective Fiction (S102B)
By James Mandrell
Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies, Comparative Literature, Women's and Gender Studies and Film Studies

Professor Mandrell's thought-provoking syllabus departs from traditional detective fiction. The stories explore complex social, cultural and political issues and avoid overly neat outcomes and conclusions. Included are "Murder in the Collective" (Barbara Wilson); "Study in Lilac" (Maria Antonia Oliver); "How Town" (Michael Nava); "Murder on a Kibbutz: A Communal Case" (Batya Gur); "The Case of the Not-So-Nice Nurse" (Mabel Maney); and "Blanche Among the Talented Tenth" (Barbara Neely).

Private Dick, Female Detective: The Life and Times of the Female Sleuth (S75)
By James Mandrell
Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies, Comparative Literature, Women's and Gender Studies and Film Studies

From Agatha Christie's Miss Marple to Paretsky's V.I. Warshawski and many more, "detective afficionados" can explore a familiar genre from a new point of view.