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The Heller School for Social Policy and Management

Last updated: September 10, 2014 at 3:14 p.m.

History and Organization

Founded in 1959, the Heller School for Social Policy and Management is committed to developing new knowledge in the fields of social policy, human service management, and international development. The fundamental mission of the school—knowledge advancing social justice—is realized through the knowledge that is generated, the education that Heller students receive, and the accomplishments of Heller alumni.

One of the roles of the Heller School is to keep the concepts of social justice and human health and well-being in the forefront of the public conscience. The school and its nationally known research institutes and centers have pioneered in a variety of policy areas, including:

Aging
Behavioral health
Children, youth, and families
Disabilities
Health services
Assets and anti-poverty
International community and economic development
Global health and development
Social Policy
Work and inequalities
Philanthropy

The Heller School was ranked among the top ten U.S. graduate schools of social policy in 2012 for the2013 U.S. News & World Report. The Heller School offers the PhD in Social Policy, the MBA in Nonprofit Management, the MA in Sustainable International Development, the Master of Science in International Health Policy and Management, the Master of Public Policy, and the MA in Coexistence and Conflict. The Heller School offers dual- and joint-degree options with Sociology, Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, and the Hornstein Jewish Professional Leadership Program. A dual JD/MA (Juris Doctor/Master of Arts in Sustainable International Development) and MA/LLM (Master of Arts in Sustainable Development/Master of Laws) are offered jointly between Northeastern University School of Law and the Heller School. The Tufts/Brandeis MD/MBA and MBA/MBS (Master of Biomedical Science) Dual Degree Programs are offered in partnership with Tufts University School of Medicine. Students are admitted separately into each degree program.

The Heller School provides its doctoral and master's students with solid training in policy research or management, community and economic development and a broad grounding in social policy. All students benefit from the resources and expertise of the Heller School's social policy research institutes and centers, which include:

The Schneider Institutes (Institute on Healthcare Systems, Institute for Behavioral Health, and Institute for Global Health and Development)
Institute on Assets and Social Policy
Institute for Child, Youth, and Family Policy
The Lurie Institute for Disability Policy
The Nathan and Toby Starr Center on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
The Center for Youth and Communities
The Sillerman Center for the Advancement of Philanthropy

Objectives

Heller's six degree programs are designed explicitly to bridge the gap between theory and practice. Students are engaged actively in examining policies and programs that respond to the changing needs of vulnerable individuals and social groups in contemporary societies, be they vulnerable as a result of economic hardship, illness, disability, age (young or old), or discrimination based on race, ethnicity, gender, or sexual orientation. These core values are reflected in Heller's deep commitment to social change, a respect for public service, and an investment in the development of public- and private-sector policies and practices that enhance health and human development.

Heller's doctoral program in social policy (PhD) educates students for careers in research, teaching, administration, and policy analysis. The Heller MBA in Nonprofit Management prepares leaders for management positions within nonprofit, for-profit, and public organizations or business units pursuing social missions. Heller's master of arts program in sustainable international development (MA) imparts the knowledge and skills necessary to design and manage local, regional, national, or international development; and the master of science in international health policy and management (MS) trains professionals to play increasingly responsible roles in the health and well-being of the world's poorest children and families. The master of public policy (MPP) trains early and mid-career professionals for roles as policy analysts, researchers, advocates, and evaluators in public and private organizations. The master of arts in coexistence and conflict (MA) trains early and midcareer professionals who are working, or aspire to work, within governments, international agencies or related fields to prevent, manage, and resolve intercommunal conflict and violence. All Heller students are committed to bettering human welfare, particularly for those who are vulnerable and who lack the capacity or resources to secure their own well-being.

Degree Programs

The Doctor of Philosophy Program in Social Policy
Heller's doctoral program educates students for careers in research, teaching, administration, and policy analysis. Students are immersed in an integrated curriculum that focuses on intensive scholarly preparation in general and on specialized social policy areas in order to apply knowledge to real-world problems. Students graduate with honed research skills and a strong working knowledge of various social science disciplines. The Heller School offers a joint PhD program with the Department of Sociology, and a joint MA in Social Policy and Studies.

The Heller MBA in Nonprofit Management
The Heller MBA program prepares leaders for management positions within nonprofit, for-profit, and public institutions pursuing social missions. It offers a rigorous core curriculum addressing all the basic management disciplines found in a traditional MBA program, providing the technical foundation but integrating the distinctive issues that arise in managing for a social mission. Students are trained as the next generation of leaders and decision makers who will know how to find resources, use them efficiently and effectively, and deliver on a social good. Heller management education rigorously blends financial, technical, and social considerations. It places management in the context of social policy, drawing on the Heller School's powerful social policy resources. This combination makes the Heller MBA unique when compared to traditional programs in management, public administration, health administration, social work, and public health. The Heller School offers a dual MBA/MA with the Hornstein Jewish Professional Leadership Program, a dual MBA/MA in sustainable international development, a dual MBA/MA in coexistence and conflict, a dual MBA/MS in international health policy and management, a dual MBA/MPP in social policy, a dual MBA/MS in Biotechnology, and a dual MBA/MD in healthcare management and a dual MBA/MBS in biomedical science in conjunction with Tufts University School of Medicine.

The Master of Arts in Sustainable International Development
Heller's MA program in sustainable international development (SID) imparts the knowledge and skills necessary for graduates to design and manage local, regional, national, or international development. Students in the SID program examine models of development, considering whether they are effective, whether they reduce poverty and inequality, and whether they raise the quality of life. Students consider the state of world development, probe issues that affect future generations, and broaden the skills necessary to plan, negotiate, implement, monitor, and evaluate development programs. Students enjoy a year in residence studying with senior researchers and field-level development practitioners, as well as a second-year field project, internship, or advanced study applying and evaluating methods and models of development. A one-year accelerated track is available for those who have at least five years of mid-level management experience in the development field. The Heller School offers a joint MA in Sustainable International Development and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, a dual MA with the Coexistence and Conflict program, a dual MA/MBA in Sustainable International Development, a dual MA/JD program and a dual MA/LLM program with Northeastern University School of Law.

The Master of Science in International Health Policy and Management
The MS is a one-year degree program that offers courses that improve analytical skills, build knowledge of public health and teach about the newest methods in the design, financing and implementation of health system changes. Students in the MS programs will learn how a health system is designed and will acquire the tools that they need to make significant policy changes in health systems around the world. Graduates of the MS program will have a robust toolset that they will be able to use to problem solve and understand many complex issues related to health policy, population health, and health systems. The program focuses not only on building useful skills to assist in high level policy design and decision making but also how to implement these policies appropriately on the ground. The required courses in the MS Program focus on specific skills that are needed to make sound health policy decisions. However, there is enough flexibility in the course work to allow individual students to focus their expertise in policy, management or development. Graduates of the MS Program follow many different career paths. Some of our graduates have returned to their home countries equipped with the necessary skills in order to move into high level positions within their Ministries of Health or other government posts. Other graduates have become key players in many influential organizations and agencies throughout the globe (USAID, World Health Organization, the World Bank, Mercy Corps and other prominent NGOs). The MS Program will also prepare those students who want to apply for further study in a PhD Program. Heller also offers a dual degree between the MS Program and the MBA program and another between the MS program and the MA program.

The Master of Public Policy
The Heller MPP prepares students for policy roles within community agencies, state and federal government, and think tanks. Heller’s high standards for rigorous and unbiased analysis are important assets to students headed for careers that will use their skills in advocacy, policy research, policy implementation and community work. The MPP program provides students with the skills necessary to design, implement, reform, analyze, and promote innovative solutions to society’s most critical problems. The MPP is a two-year degree program that follows the traditional academic year from late August to May. The Heller School offers a dual MPP/MA with the Hornstein Jewish Professional Leadership Program, a dual MBA/MPP, and a joint degree with Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

The Master of Arts in Coexistence and Conflict
The Master's Program in Coexistence and Conflict at the Heller School for Social Policy and Management focuses on the challenges posed by intercommunal and societal conflicts in today's world. Bringing greater professional policy and practical expertise and leadership to bear upon these challenges is the goal. Since its inception in 2004, the program has become the preferred choice of midcareer professionals who want and need to understand how better to prevent, manage and resolve such conflicts. The curriculum of the Master's Program in Coexistence and Conflict ensures that participants will secure a solid grounding in the theories of contemporary coexistence and conflict work, as well as develop the professional skills to design and implement successful interventions to deal with the challenges of such conflicts. The sixteen-month program involves an academic year in residence studying at Brandeis, followed by a three-month field placement and the completion of a master's field project. The Heller School offers a dual MA with the program in sustainable international development and a dual MA/MBA in nonprofit management.

Admission


How to Apply to the Heller School for Social Policy and Management


Application materials and detailed procedures for each degree program can be found on the website heller.brandeis.edu or by contacting The Heller School Office of Admissions at 781-736-3820 or HellerAdmissions@brandeis.edu. All applications should demonstrate a commitment to addressing some of the world's most pressing social issues as well as a readiness to take on graduate-level studies.

Application deadlines and requirements vary by program. Please see below.


Test Scores and Deadlines


The PhD Program
The application deadline for the PhD program is January 15. The application process and requirements are the same for full-time and part-time applicants. All applicants must submit the online application form, application fee (waived for Brandeis alumni and current or returned Peace Corps, AmeriCorps, City Year and other service organization volunteers), statement of purpose, writing sample, transcripts, official GRE scores, three letters of recommendation, a professional resume/CV, and official TOEFL or IELTS scores for international students whose native language is not English.

Applicants to the PhD program in social policy must submit test results of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). The test must be taken within five years of the application and must be submitted directly to the Heller School from ETS using the ETS institutional code: 3097. Although the application process is very competitive, the Heller School does not cite minimum score requirements, as test results are evaluated in conjunction with an applicant's educational background and professional experience. Further information on the GRE can be obtained at www.gre.org.

International applicants whose native language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency. Official scores from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) test are preferred. Further information about these tests can be found at www.toefl.org and www.ielts.org.

The Heller MBA in Nonprofit Management
The application deadlines for the full time MBA program and part-time MBA program (fall start) are November 15 (early deadline), January 15 (priority round one), March 1 (priority round two) and July 1. It is in an applicant’s best interest to apply early to be considered for merit-based scholarships. Applications received after July 1 will be evaluated on a space available basis. Applicants to the part-time MBA program who wish to enter in the spring semester must submit a completed application by November 1. All MBA applicants must submit the online application form, application fee (waived for Brandeis alumni and employees, and current or returned Peace Corps, AmeriCorps, City Year and other service organization volunteers), statement of purpose, two additional application questions, transcripts, official GMAT (preferred) or GRE scores, official TOEFL or IELTS scores (international students whose native language is not English), two letters of recommendation, and a professional resume/CV.

Applicants to the MBA program must submit official test scores from the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) or the test results of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). The test must be taken within five years of the application and must be submitted directly to the Heller School from ETS using our ETS institutional code: 3097. Although the application process is very competitive, the Heller School does not cite minimum score requirements, as test results are evaluated in conjunction with an applicant's educational background and professional experience. Further information on the GMAT and the GRE can be obtained at www.mba.com/mba/takethegmat and www.gre.org.

International applicants whose native language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency. Official scores from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) test are preferred. Further information about these tests can be found at www.toefl.org and www.ielts.org.

The MA/Sustainable International Development Program
The MA in Sustainable International Development program reviews applications on a rolling basis. It is in an applicant’s best interest to apply early to be considered for merit-based scholarships. All applicants must submit the online application form, application fee (waived for Brandeis alumni, applicants from low-income nations, and current or returned Peace Corps, AmeriCorps, City Year and other service organization volunteers ), statement of purpose, transcripts, official TOEFL or IELTS scores (international students whose native language is not English), three letters of recommendation, and a professional résumé/CV. A short research proposal is required for applicants to the MA/SID one-year, accelerated-track option.

Standardized test scores are not required of applicants to the MA program, although applicants to the joint MA/MBA program must submit official test scores from the GMAT or GRE. International applicants whose native language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency. Official scores from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) test are preferred, but the test requirement may be waived if an approved alternative confirmation of language proficiency is presented to the Office of Admissions. Further information about these tests can be found at www.toefl.org and www.ielts.org.

The MS/International Health Policy and Management Program
The MS in International Health Policy and Management program reviews applications on a rolling basis. It is in an applicant’s best interest to apply early to be considered for merit-based scholarships. All applicants must submit the online application form, application fee (waived for Brandeis alumni, applicants from low-income nations, and current or returned Peace Corps, AmeriCorps, City Year and other service organization volunteers ), statement of purpose, transcripts, official TOEFL or IELTS scores (international students whose native language is not English), three letters of recommendation, and a professional résumé/CV.

Standardized test scores are not required of applicants to the MS program, although applicants to the dual degree MS/MBA program must submit official test scores from the GMAT or the GRE. International applicants whose native language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency. Official scores from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) test are preferred, but the test requirement may be waived if an approved alternative confirmation of language proficiency is presented to the Office of Admissions. Further information about these tests can be found at www.toefl.org or www.ielts.org.

The MPP Program
The application deadlines for the MPP program are January 15 (Priority Round One), March 1 (Priority Round Two) and June 1. Applications received after June 1 will be evaluated on a space available basis. It is in an applicant’s best interest to apply early to be considered for merit-based scholarships. All applicants must submit the online application form, application fee (waived for Brandeis alumni and current or returned Peace Corps, AmeriCorps, City Year and other service organization volunteers), statement of purpose, transcripts, official GRE scores, official TOEFL or IELTS scores (international students whose native language is not English), three letters of recommendation, and a professional résumé/CV.

Applicants to the MPP program must submit test results of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). The test must be taken within five years of the application and must be submitted directly to the Heller School from ETS using the ETS institutional code: 3097. Although the application process is very competitive, the Heller School does not cite minimum score requirements, as test results are evaluated in conjunction with an applicant's educational background and professional experience. Further information on the GRE can be obtained at www.gre.org.

International applicants whose native language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency. Official scores from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) test are preferred. Further information about these tests can be found at www.toefl.org and www.ielts.org.

The MA/Coexistence and Conflict Program
The application deadlines for the MA in Coexistence and Conflict program are January 15 (Priority Round One), March 1 (Priority Round Two) and June 1. It is in an applicant’s best interest to apply early to be considered for merit-based scholarships. All applicants must submit the online application form, application fee (waived for Brandeis alumni, applicants from low-income nations and current or returned Peace Corps, AmeriCorps, City Year and other service organization volunteers ), statement of purpose, transcripts, official TOEFL or IELTS scores (international students whose native language is not English), three letters of recommendation, and a professional résumé/CV.

Standardized test scores are not required of applicants to the MA program International applicants whose native language is not English must submit proof of English language proficiency. Official scores from the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) test are preferred. Further information about these tests can be found at www.toefl.org and www.ielts.org.

Academic Regulations

For complete information about academic regulations governing the Heller School's PhD, MBA, MA/SID, MS, MPP, and MA/COEX programs, refer to the Academic Policies and Procedures documents for each degree, available from the Heller School Office of Student Records and Enrollment.


Academic Standing


The Heller School reviews students' academic progress annually. Satisfactory academic progress in a program is essential to maintain one's eligibility for funding. Superior performance at Brandeis University is essential. Academic insufficiency or failure to make suitable progress toward the degree may result in withdrawal.


Registration


Every resident, post-resident, and continuation student must register at the beginning of each term, whether attending regular courses of study, carrying on research or independent reading, writing a thesis or dissertation, or utilizing any academic service or facility of the university. Registration requires enrollment in a course—whether a regular course, independent research, or a status course for post-resident and continuation students.

Students work closely with their advisers in planning their program of study. All students file an Individualized Learning Plan (ILP) with the Heller School Office of Student Records. At the end of the registration period for each term (see Academic Calendar for specific date), no additional courses may be added to a student's schedule and enrollment is considered to be final, unless a student formally drops a course prior to the drop deadline.


Auditing Courses


The privilege of auditing courses without paying a fee is extended to all regularly enrolled full-time graduate students. Auditors may not take examinations or expect evaluation from the instructor. No credit is given for an audited course. To audit a course, students must obtain the written permission of the instructor on an add/drop form and return it to the Heller School Office of Student Records and Enrollment by the deadline established in the Academic Calendar.


Change of Program


Students are allowed to drop courses after the end of the online registration period only with permission of the instructor. To do so, students must obtain an add/drop form and return it to the Heller School Office of Student Records and Enrollment. Courses must be dropped by the deadline established in the Academic Calendar.


Grades and Course Standards


Graduate students are expected to maintain records of distinction in all courses. Letter grades will be used in all courses for master's degree-level students. Doctoral students receive "satisfactory (S)" or "unsatisfactory (U)."

Any letter grade below B- is considered unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward credit for degree requirements. There is one exception to this rule. For master’s programs in which students are in residence for four semesters or more, students may receive a grade of C+ in two courses throughout their program and still earn graduate degree credit for such courses. For master’s programs in which students are in residence for two or three semesters, students may receive only one grade of C+ throughout their program and still earn graduate degree credit. Students are not allowed to receive a grade below B- in the capstone course of their respective programs (Team Consulting Project [TCP] for the MBA Program). If a student receives two grades of C+ in one semester and one of the C+ grades is not eligible for degree credit (e.g., master’s programs in which students are in residence for two or three semesters), the Program Director may decide or create a committee to decide which course will count toward degree requirements.


Incompletes


A student who has not completed the research or written work including examinations for any course may receive an EI (incomplete) or a failing grade at the discretion of the course instructor. A student who receives an EI must satisfactorily complete the work of the course in order to receive credit for the course and a letter grade. An incomplete must be made up no later than the date published in the academic calendar for the term.

An EI that is not resolved by the published deadline will become a permanent incomplete (I).


Full-Time Resident Students


A full-time graduate student is one who devotes his/her entire time, during the course of the academic year, to a program of graduate work at Brandeis.

A full-time program may include a combination of teaching and research assistance and other work leading to the fulfillment of degree requirements, such as preparation for qualifying, comprehensive, and final examinations; supervised reading and research; PhD dissertations; and regular course work.

A full-time resident student must take a minimum of twelve credits per term unless otherwise approved by his or her program director. An accelerated program of study or payment of more than the full-time tuition rate in any single academic year may not satisfy the minimum residence requirement for any degree.


Part-Time Resident Students


A part-time graduate student is one who devotes less than the entire time to a program of graduate work at Brandeis. Part-time students are expected to enroll in two courses per term unless otherwise approved by their program director. Part-time students must register as continuation status in any semester in which they are not enrolled in courses.

Students receiving financial aid from the university who wish to change their status from full-time to part-time residency must request permission to do so from their program director and file their change of status with the office of admissions and financial aid with an explanation of why full-time study is no longer possible.


Post-Resident Students


A graduate student who has completed residence requirements and who needs to utilize the full range of academic services and university facilities while completing degree requirements is a post-resident student. This includes doctoral students who do not have approved dissertation proposals. Post-resident students must enroll in a status course (CONT 500a), as they are considered to be full-time students.


Continuation Students


A doctoral student who has completed all degree requirements (including the dissertation proposal hearing) except the dissertation is eligible for continuation status. Students in this category must enroll in a status course (CONT 250 summer term and CONT 500 fall and spring term), as they are considered to be full-time students. Full-time continuation students are eligible for university health insurance, borrowing privileges in the Library, a computer account, use of gym facilities, and purchase of a parking sticker.

A student must be registered and enrolled in the term(s) in which the dissertation is defended and submitted to the Heller School Office of Student Records and Enrollment.

MA students are considered full-time continuation students during their second year when engaged in their field projects.


Limit of Candidacy for the Ph.D. Degree for Students Entering the Program


General Guidelines
1) All required coursework and the comprehensive exam are expected to be completed within two calendar years from admission for full-time students, and four calendar years for part-time students.
2) The dissertation proposal development, review, and hearing are expected to be completed within one calendar year after #1.
3) The dissertation is expected to be completed and defended within two calendar years after #2.

These guidelines are not intended to restrict the pace at which any student proceeds in the Ph.D. program. Rather, they articulate the expected pace that most students should follow.

Time Limit in the Ph.D. Program
While the expected time for completion of the Ph.D. program is 4-5 years, there is a maximum of 10 years allowed for completion, 12 years for part-time students. There is no possibility for reinstatement after the maximum time limit has been reached. Full-time students must defend their dissertations no later than 9½ years (before March 1) from their entry into the program. Part-time students must defend their dissertations no later than 11 ½ years (before March 1) from their entry in the program. If any student’s dissertation committee requires any changes, whether minor or major, the student has no more than 6 months to successfully re-defend his or her dissertation.

In no case can the 10-year time limit be exceeded for a successful dissertation defense for full-time students, nor can the 12-year time limit be exceeded for a successful defense for part-time students. Exceptions to this policy are not permitted under any circumstances.

Full-time students must successfully defend their dissertation proposal, including minor or major changes, within 6 years (before August 31) from the date of their entry into the program. Part-time students must successfully defend their dissertation proposal, including any minor or major changes, by 8 years (before August 31) after their entry into the program (August 31). Failure to successfully defend either the proposal or the dissertation within these time limits will result in termination from the program. Exceptions to this policy are not permitted under any circumstances.

Actions to Monitor Progress
Although students are responsible for ensuring that their progress is satisfactory and timely, the PhD program will contact students in writing each year after successful completion of the comprehensive exam to ensure that students are fully aware of their progress and of the School’s policies and expectations. Students who are not achieving satisfactory progress may be asked to leave the program.

At the end of the first year following the successful completion of the comprehensive exam, students who do not have an approved dissertation proposal are required to meet with the PhD program director and their concentration’s chairperson to determine a plan of action. The student will be responsible for preparing a report following the meeting to describe the proposed plan for completion or any other decision the student has made regarding continued progress. The report will be submitted to the Director of the Ph.D. Program and to the concentration chairperson.


Special Students


No more than two full course equivalents (8 credits) taken for credit may be transferable to degree candidacy if the student is admitted to the doctoral program, the MPP, or the MBA. No more than four credits (two module courses or one full-semester course) may be transferable to degree candidacy if the student is admitted to the MA program in Coexistence and Conflict or MA program in Sustainable International Development. Successful completion of a course(s) as a Special Student does not guarantee admission into any degree program. Special Students are considered with all other applicants to the School.


Leave of Absence


Students may petition for a leave of absence. The petition must have the approval of the student's program director. Leaves of absence up to one year will normally be granted to students. Leaves of absence beyond one year are extended only for medical reasons. Any student wishing to extend the leave of absence must submit a written request with medical documentation before the leave expires. If there are outstanding incompletes when a student begins a leave, the student will not be allowed to reregister until the missing work has been completed. The PhD Program only allows leave during the residency.


Withdrawal


A student who wishes to withdraw voluntarily from the Heller School during a semester must do so in writing to the program director and must file his or her request with the Office of Student Records and Enrollment before the last day of instruction of the semester. Failure to notify in writing of a withdrawal may subject the student to loss of eligibility for refunds in accordance with the refund schedule outlined in the "Fees and Expenses" section. Permission to withdraw voluntarily will not be granted if the student has not discharged all financial obligations to the university or has not made financial arrangements satisfactory to the Office of Student Financial Services. When a student withdraws during or at the end of a semester, course enrollments are not expunged from his/her record, rather a grade of W ("dropped") is entered for each course.

Students who are obliged to register and fail to do so by the appropriate deadline or who fail to pay their bill will be administratively withdrawn. They may be readmitted (see below) for study in a subsequent term, but not for the term in which they were withdrawn for failure to register. Belatedly fulfilling financial obligations will not negate the effects of administrative withdrawal.


Readmission


A student who has not been enrolled in the Heller School for more than one year and who did not obtain a leave of absence should file an application for readmission and will be charged the readmission fee. The student's program will determine in each case whether a student should be readmitted. If the program's requirements have changed during the student's absence or the student is not deemed current in his or her field of study, the program may require the student to repeat or supplement previous academic requirements, including qualifying exams. When a student is reinstated, he or she will be informed of current status regarding credits and time to degree.


Graduate Cross-Registration


The Heller School has cross-registration agreements with Bentley University School of Business Administration, Boston College, Boston University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Regis College, and Tufts University. A full-time graduate student at the Heller School may enroll in one graduate-level course per term (excluding the summer term) at any one of these institutions. Information on courses for cross-registration at each of the host institutions is available at the graduate school office of each institution.

A student who wishes to enroll in a course at one of these institutions should consult with the instructor in the particular course and should expect to satisfy the prerequisites and requirements normally required for admission to the course, including adherence to the academic calendar of that course. To enroll in a graduate course at one of the host institutions, a student should obtain a cross-registration petition from the University Registrar and should present this petition to both the Heller Office of Student Records and Enrollment and the Registrar's office of the host institution for approval. The completed petition should be returned to the Heller School Office of Student Records and Enrollment prior to the deadline established in the Academic Calendar.

Any part-time graduate student in a degree program is allowed to participate in cross-registration. Students may only take one cross-registration course a semester, and are required to take at least one Brandeis course in addition to the cross-registered course. Students cannot exceed taking the equivalent of one cross-registration course per semester of residency.

Due to differences in academic calendars among the colleges in the consortium, it is not advisable for degree candidates to enroll in a cross-registered course in their final semester.

Fees and Expenses


Tuition and Fees


The following tuition and fees are in effect for the 2013-2014 academic year. These figures are subject to annual revision by the Brandeis Board of Trustees.

Payment of tuition and other fees is due on August 9, 2013, for the fall semester and January 3, 2014, for the spring semester. A student who has not paid such fees by the day of registration will be refused the privilege of registration. A late fee will be assessed to all student accounts with outstanding balances after the stated due date. The amount of the late fee will be $100, or 2 percent of the outstanding balance, whichever is greater.

Application fee: $55
Payable by all applicants for admission at the time the application for admission is submitted.

Tuition

PhD Program
Full-time: $43,756 per year
Post-resident: $2,740 per year
Continuation: $1,370 per year
Part-time: $4,320 per course or $1,080 per credit

MBA Program
Full-time: $21,878 per semester (four consecutive semesters program)
Part-time: $5,470 per course or $1367 per credit
Heller Program Fee: $350 per year

MA/SID Program
$43,756 for first year
$1,370 continuation fee for second year
Heller Program Fee: $350 per year

MS/IHPM Program
$43,756 per year
Heller Program Fee: $350 per year

MPP Program
$43,756 per year
Heller Program Fee: $350 per year

MA/COEX Program
$43,756 per year
Heller Program Fee: $350 per year

Returned Check Fee: $25 per incident
A bank service fee will be charged to a student's account if a payment or a check negotiated through Brandeis is returned by the bank for any reason.

Transcript Fee: $5
Students, former students, and graduates should request official transcripts of their records from the Office of the University Registrar. Students are entitled to twenty official transcripts of their academic work without charge. A charge of $5 may be made for each subsequent transcript. Requests by mail for transcripts must be accompanied by a check in the correct amount payable to Brandeis University. Official transcripts will be issued only to those students whose university financial records are in order.

Orientation Fee: $44 per year

Graduate Activity Fee: $80 per year

Student Health Services Fee: $806 per year (optional)
Entitles the full-time graduate student to use of Health Services.

Student Health Insurance Plan (single coverage): $1,903 per year (estimated)
All three-quarter or full-time students are required by state law to show certification of health insurance. Students without insurance of their own must purchase the Student Health Insurance Plan through the university. The fee is payable prior to registration and no portion is refundable. Student insurance is optional for special students. Additional insurance options, including family coverage, are described in A Guide to University Health Services, which is available from Health Services.

Parking Fee: $60-250 per year
Payable annually at fall registration for privilege of parking an automobile on campus. Fee varies with assigned parking area.

Late Fee: $100, or 2 percent of the outstanding balance, whichever is greater
A student who defaults in the payment of indebtedness to the university shall be subject to suspension, dismissal, and refusal of a transfer of credits or issuance of an official transcript. In addition, the university may refer the debt to an outside collection agency. The student is responsible for costs associated with the collection of the debt.

Such indebtedness includes, but is not limited to, delinquency of a borrower in repaying a loan administered by the student loan office and the inability of that office to collect such a loan because the borrower has discharged the indebtedness through bankruptcy proceedings. If the student is a degree, certificate, or diploma candidate, his or her name will be stricken from the rolls.

A student who has been suspended or dismissed for nonpayment of indebtedness to the university may not be reinstated until such indebtedness is paid in full.

Final Doctoral Fee: $235
This fee covers all costs for the year in which the PhD degree will be conferred, including the costs for the full publishing services for the dissertation and three xerographic softbound copies (for the chair, department, and Library). The final doctoral fee also covers the cost of the diploma.

Note: All candidates for the PhD degree must file their application for degree and pay the $235 final doctoral fee at the office of student records and enrollment.

Refunds


The only fee that may be refundable, in part, is the tuition fee. No refund of the tuition fee will be made because of illness, absence, or dismissal during the academic year. A student who is withdrawing must notify the Heller School's chief administrative officer in writing; refunds will be based on the date of notification and calculated in accordance with the following:

1. Tuition

Withdrawal

Before the opening day of instruction: 100 percent of the term's tuition.

On or before the second Friday following the opening day of instruction: 75 percent of the term's tuition.

On or before the fifth Friday following the opening day of instruction: 50 percent of the term's tuition.

After the fifth Friday following the opening day of instruction: no refund.

Requests for refunds should be addressed to the Office of Student Financial Services.

2. Scholarship

In the case of a scholarship student who withdraws, the student's account will be credited with the same proportion of the term scholarship as charged for tuition: 75 percent if the student leaves on or before the second Friday; 50 percent on or before the fifth Friday and no refund thereafter.

3. Stafford Loans

In compliance with federal law, special refund arrangements apply to students receiving aid under Title IV. Contact the Heller School assistant dean for admissions and financial aid for additional information.

Refund Policy for Dropped Courses

A student who drops courses on the per-course tuition-charge basis is allowed a refund following this schedule:

1. Full semester-long courses

Before the opening day of instruction through the last day of the registration period (see the Academic Calendar): 100 percent of the dropped course’s tuition fee.

On or before the fifth Friday following the opening day of instruction: 50 percent of the dropped course’s tuition fee.

After the fifth Friday following the opening day of instruction: no refund.

2. Module courses

On or before the second Friday of module instruction (see the Academic Calendar): 100 percent of the dropped course’s tuition fee.

After the second Friday of module instruction: no refund.


Housing


Ten-month living expenses in the Waltham area for a single individual on an economical budget are estimated to range from $9,000 to $18,486. 


Financial Aid


The Heller School attempts to assist as many students as possible in securing financial aid, although it is expected that candidates for admission will explore a variety of outside funding sources, such as private scholarships, state scholarships, and G.I. Bill benefits. The Heller School offers scholarships and fellowships awarded on the basis of academic merit. These grants rarely cover the full cost of study plus living expenses, but, in combination with federal loans, make up the typical aid package. Part-time students are not eligible to receive fellowships from the Heller School.

For more information about fellowships, scholarships, and loans for all of our degree programs, visit the Heller School's Web site at www.heller.brandeis.edu, or contact the Office of Admissions.  


Loans


Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans are available to graduate students. Applicants must file the FAFSA to qualify for this loan. Graduate students may borrow up to a maximum of $20,500 a year with an aggregate maximum of $138,500, with no more than $65,500 in subsidized loan funds.

The interest rate on the Stafford Loan for the 13-14 academic year was a fixed rate of 6.21 percent and the origination fee was 1.072 percent.

Repayment of a Stafford Loan begins six months after the borrower ceases to be enrolled at least half-time. The standard repayment period is 10 years, during which time interest is charged. (Please go to www.studentloans.gov for information about alternate repayment plans.) Students are required to pay the interest during the in-school period, or have it capitalized and added to the loan balance, for the unsubsidized loan.

The terms for the above loan programs are subject to federal legislation, regulations and other guidance, and may change. Additional current information is available from the Graduate School.

Students wishing to apply for loans should contact the Heller School for application materials.

The Graduate PLUS Loan is a federal loan that allows graduate students to borrow up to their total cost of education less any financial aid received. The student must pass an independent credit review. For the 13-14 academic year, the PLUS Loan had an interest rate of 7.21 percent and an origination fee of 4.288 percent. Go to www.studentloans.gov to apply for this loan.

Faculty

See the school's Web site at www.heller.brandeis.edu for a full faculty listing.

Requirements for the Degrees


Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts in Sustainable International Development


Program of Study
Students must successfully complete a minimum of 8 full-semester or equivalent module courses during the first year in residence (32 credits in two semesters of 16 credits each). During their spring semester in residence, students work with a primary adviser to plan a second-year master’s project that can be a full-time practicum at a development organization (6 months, 24 credits), an alternative practicum at a partner university (24 credits), a specialization comprised of a practicum (3 months, 12 credits) and an additional semester in residence (16 credits), or advanced study (24 credits in two semesters of 12 credits each). During this second year, students must complete a master’s paper under the supervision of their Brandeis adviser. All students return to campus at the end of the second year to share the results of their master’s projects at a capstone seminar.

Accelerated Degree
The 12-month accelerated MA/SID degree exempts a select group of advanced development practitioners from the second year. Accelerated students enter with all incoming students in late August and fulfill all first year in residence requirements for the existing program in the fall and spring semesters. Students present at SID Capstone in May. During the summer students write a master’s paper that applies development theory and skills to solving a real development problem encountered in their work in the field.

Residence Requirement
One year in residence as a full-time student, and all degree requirements must be met within five years.

Master's Project
The master's paper and participation in SID Capstone are required for the granting of the degree.


Requirements for the Dual Degree of Master of Arts in Sustainable International Development & Juris Doctorate with Northeastern University School of Law


Program of Study
Students will complete course  requirements for the MA SID in their first year in residence (32 credits  over two semestersin addition to all requirements for the JD program, as outlined in Northeastern University School of Law documents. In their second year of the SID program, students will participate in Northeastern’s cooperative education program, gaining professional expereinece that combining law with international development; this in lieu of standard SID practicum at a development organization. Studetns will write e a professional reflection paper that integrate their learning from both legal and sustainable development perspectives.

Admission
Students apply and are accepted to each degree program separately.

Residence Requirement at Brandeis
One year in residence as a full-time student, and all degree requirements must be met within five years.

Master's Project

Students must fulfill final paper and SID Capstone presentation requirements.


Requirements for the Dual Degree of Master of Arts in Sustainable International Development & Northeastern University School of Law Master of Laws


Program of Study
The dual degree option awards a Master of Laws (LLM) degree from Northeastern University School of Law and the MA SID degree from Brandeis in two years of study and a field placement. The program requires two academic years in residence, one at NUSL and one at the Heller School, and a summer field practicum. Students can start at either NUSL or Heller. Students must fulfill all year in residence requirements for the MA in Sustainable International Development (32 credits), as well as 33 quarter credits in one year (three quarters) at NUSL for the LLM degree.

For the LLM degree, students must complete courses in legal research, legal writing, and an introduction to US law and legal institutions along with a substantive program of upper-level legal courses relevant to development in areas such as trade, environment, human rights, poverty and economic development, health, immigration, labor, intellectual property, social change, and/or public international law. An approved piece of legal writing completed in conjunction with a seminar is required of all students. A legal placement experience is available.

For the MA/SID degree, students must satisfactorily complete a 3-month practicum (12 credits) related to sustainable development, ideally linked with legal and policy aspects relevant to the LLM degree, and produce a a professional reflection paper integrating their learning from legal and sustainable development perspectives.

Admission
Students apply and are accepted to each degree program separately.

Residence Requirement at Brandeis
One year in residence as a full-time student, and all degree requirements must be met within two years.

Master's Project
Students must fulfill final paper and SID Capstone presentation requirements.


Requirements for the Joint Degree of Master of Arts in Sustainable International Development & Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies


Program of Study
Students must complete the first year in residence (32 credits) for the MA SID degree, as well as the following WGS requirements in the second year (two semesters in residence):

A. WMGS 205a: Graduate Foundational Course.

B. A course in feminist research methodologies (WMGS 208b, the Feminist Inquiry course offered through the Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies).

C. Two elective graduate courses in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (one inside the Heller School and one outside the Heller School).

Admission
To gain acceptance to the joint degree, applicants must meet all qualifications and be admitted by both programs.

Residence Requirement
Two years in residence as a full-time student, and all degree requirements must be met within two years.

Master's Project
Completion of a master's paper of professional quality and length on a topic related to the joint degree and presentation at SID Capstone. The paper will be advised by a member of the Heller faculty and a member of the WMGS core or affiliate faculty.


Requirements for the Dual Degree of Master of Arts in Sustainable International Development & Coexistence and Conflict


Program of Study
This dual-degree program requires a total of 72 credits. Students must complete 32 credits in the first year, including 22 credits in required courses for the MA SID degree. The balance of credits in the first year is filled by core electives approved for the MA SID program, with 4 credits from the approved list of MA COEX courses.

In the second year in residence, students must complete the remaining 40 credits from MA COEX, which includes 18 credits of required courses. The other credits are comprised of 4 credits from approved MA COEX courses, 4 credits from approved MA SID courses, and the remaining credits from successful completion of a field project and written paper or report. Preparation for the field project is undertaken in the spring semester research course. For the MA SID degree, students must participate in SID Capstone in May and complete a professional reflection paper integrating their learning from sustainable development and coexistence perspectives.

Students will be enrolled on in the summer and fall after the second academic year to complete the field project and report. The submission deadline for the written report from the field project is December 1, and students must participate in MA COEX Capstone.

Accelerated Dual Degree
The accelerated MA SID and MA COEX dual degree allows a select group of advanced practitioners to complete both degrees in 21 months. Accelerated students enter with all incoming students in late August and fulfill all requirements for the existing program in two years in residence. Students are required to do a 3 month field practicum in the summer between the years in residence, write the COEX field report the following fall and present at COEX Capstone in December of the second year in residence. Students write the SID reflection paper and present at SID Capstone in May of the second year.

Admission
To gain acceptance to the dual degree, applicants must meet all qualifications and be admitted by both programs. To enter the accelerated degree, applicants must meet MA SID requirements for accelerated students, and demonstrate the maturity as well as the writing skills to complete both degrees in an integrated fashion.

Residence Requirement
Two years in residence as a full-time student, and all degree requirements must be met within five years.

Master's Project
Students must fulfill final paper and capstone presentation requirements as defined for both programs.


Requirements for the Dual Degree of Master of Arts in Sustainable International Development & Master of Science in International Health Policy and Management


Program of Study
This dual degree awards the MA SID and MS IHPM degrees to highly qualified students in 21 months that include two years in residence, a field placement, and a professional paper or project. Students may enter in either program and must complete:

A. All required courses and a minimum of 32 credits for the MA SID degree in one year in residence (two semesters).

B. All required courses and a minimum of 32 credits for the MS IHPM degree in one year in residence (two semesters).

C. A summer practicum or field placement of 3 months (12 credits) related to sustainable development and health.

During the second year in residence, students must prepare a professional paper or project, integrating their learning from the perspectives of international health and sustainable development. The paper or project must be done in cooperation with a faculty advisor and reflect graduate-level scholarship representing the culmination of academic work for the dual degree and demonstrating the student's ability to synthesize knowledge and skills learned in both programs. Students present at SID Capstone in May of the second year.

Admission
To gain acceptance to the dual degree, applicants must meet all qualifications and be admitted by both programs. Applicants must meet MA SID requirements for accelerated students and demonstrate the maturity as well as the writing skills to complete both degrees in an integrated fashion.

Residence Requirement
Two years in residence as a full-time student, and all degree requirements must be met within five years.

Master's Project
Completion of a professional paper or project and presentation at SID Capstone.


Requirements for the Joint Degree of Master of Arts in Social Policy & Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies


Students enrolled in the PhD program in social policy may elect to pursue a joint master's degree in Social Policy & Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, with the program director's permission as well as the agreement of the Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies program. This masters in passing degree option replaces the master's degree in social policy and can only be earned in a semester prior to the conferral of the doctoral degree in social policy. The joint degree provides students an opportunity to mesh the Heller School’s social policy research and analytical training with issues that affect women and gender. The joint MA is for a select group of students interested in pursuing an additional interdisciplinary perspective. Students in the program must be willing to do additional course work, take part in a proseminar, and write a master's paper.

Please refer to the requirements for the PhD as this MA is open only to PhD students in Social Policy.

Program of Study
A. WMGS 205a or another course designated as a graduate foundational course in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

B. A course in feminist research methodologies (WMGS 208b, the feminist inquiry course offered through the Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies, or an alternative).

C. Two courses cross-listed with Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (one inside the Heller School and one in any department other than the Heller School).

D. Participation in a year-long noncredit Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies graduate proseminar.

E. Completion of a master's research paper of professional quality and length (normally twenty-five to forty pages) on a topic related to the joint degree. The paper will be read by two faculty members, one of whom is a member of the Heller School faculty and one of whom is a member of the Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies core or affiliate faculty.


Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts in Coexistence and Conflict


Program of Study
The sixteen-month program involves one academic year in residence at Brandeis in which students complete seven courses (26 credits) during the fall and spring semesters, followed by a three-month summer field placement and a the completion of master's paper (12 credits) by December.

Master’s Project and Paper
All students are required to complete an internship or independent fieldwork, with a concluding paper written under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Students must develop an MA project designed to test their application of theory to practice, to expand their policy and practical experience, and, under supervision, to increase their security and comfort levels at working in what is usually a contentious and sometimes dangerous field. In addition, the field project is planned to test and improve the breadth and depth of students' professional skills and to significantly increase their networks of collaboration.

The project will consist of either of the following options:

A. An internship of at least three months in a governmental or nongovernmental organization assisting with the development and implementation of a policy or a program of coexistence intervention. Students will (1) identify an intervention or their particular part of an intervention; (2) set objectives and time lines; (3) secure partners where necessary for its implementation; (4) ensure that appropriate monitoring and evaluating techniques are built into the program design; and (5) write a final report on the intervention.

B. Independent fieldwork for at least three months in a conflict area. Such fieldwork will be designed to assist the generation and development of new coexistence and conflict management intervention options, and must be undertaken in partnership with policymakers or practitioners who are already working in the area. The report of this fieldwork includes feedback and evaluations from prospective partners already working in the area. Students who are on a sabbatical from their place of employment, and whose courses of study are funded by that employer, may carry out their project either within, or on behalf of, their sponsoring organization with the approval of the program director. The option of doing a Master’s thesis as a final output of the independent field research must be approved by the COEX program.


Requirements for the Joint Degree of Master of Arts in Coexistence and Conflict & Near Eastern and Judaic Studies


Program of Study and Residence Requirement
Ordinarily, two years of full-time residence are required at the normal course rate of seven or eight courses each academic year. This joint-degree program requires a minimum of 64 credits.

1. At least eight courses must be taken in the Near Eastern and Judaic Studies department and must include the NEJS graduate Pro seminar (NEJS 231a) and joint MA capstone project and paper (see below). Students may not include courses taken to prepare for the MA language examination (HBRW 102a and b and below, or ARBC 40b and below) among these eight courses. Students who enter with graduate credit from other recognized institutions may apply for transfer credit for up to two courses that are comparable to NEJS offerings, or, with prior approval of the MA adviser, candidates may receive transfer credit for up to two courses at a university abroad.

2. At least eight courses must be taken in Coexistence and Conflict program. They include the six COEX core courses: HS 210a (Coexistence and Conflict: Theory and Analysis), HS 220a (Strategies for Coexistence Interventions), HS 227f (Introduction to Design, Monitoring and Evaluation, 2 credits), HS 230f (Coexistence Research Methods, 2 credits), HS 240a (Dialogue and Mediation Skills), and HS 244a (Responsible Negotiation). Students must also take POL 164A (Conflict and Peacemaking in the Middle East) and choose at least 4 credits in the list of COEX core elective courses.

All course selections and their relevance must be discussed with and approved by the NEJS Director of Graduate Studies and the COEX program director.

Language Requirement
All candidates are required to demonstrate language proficiency, normally in biblical or modem Hebrew or Arabic. The language requirement for Hebrew or Arabic may be fulfilled in one of two ways:

1. By enrolling in and receiving a grade of B- or higher in a 40-level or higher Hebrew or Arabic course, or by passing a classical Hebrew text course, or modem Hebrew literature course taught in Hebrew;

2. By passing the language examination offered by the adviser or by the Hebrew faculty or Arabic faculty.

Joint Master's Project and Paper
All students are required to complete an internship or independent fieldwork, with a concluding paper written under the supervision of two faculty mentors, one from NEJS and one from COEX. Students must develop an MA project designed to test their application of Coexistence and Conflict theory to practice while applying their background in NEJS. This will entail expanding students' policy and practical experience, and, under supervision, increasing their security and comfort levels at working in what is usually a contentious and sometimes dangerous field. In addition, the field project is planned to test and improve the breadth and depth of student's professional skills and to significantly increase their networks of collaboration.

The project will consist of either of the following options:

1. An internship of at least three months in a governmental or nongovernmental organization (consistent with the NEJS focus) assisting with the development and implementation of a policy or a program of coexistence intervention. Students will (1) identify an intervention or their particular part of an intervention; (2) set objectives and timelines; (3) secure partners and terms of references, where necessary for its implementation; (4) ensure that appropriate monitoring and evaluating techniques are built into the program design; and (5) write a final report on the intervention.

2. Independent fieldwork for at least three months in a conflict area (consistent with the NEJS focus). Such fieldwork will be designed to assist the generation and development of new coexistence and conflict management intervention options, and must be undertaken in partnership with policymakers or practitioners who are already working in the area. The report of this fieldwork includes feedback and evaluations from prospective partners already working in the area.

The option of doing a Master’s thesis can be discussed with, and approved by, the NEJS Director of Graduate Studies and the COEX program director.


Requirements for the Degree of Master of Business Administration


Program of Study
The Heller MBA requires sixty-eight credits over sixteen months in residence, including fifty two credits in the core curriculum, twelve credits in a chosen policy concentration, and four additional elective credits. Policy concentrations include: nonprofit management; health care management; child, youth and family services management; social entrepreneurship and impact management; public management; and sustainable development.

Residence Requirement
Students must be in residence for a minimum of sixteen months and complete all degree requirements within five years. Full-time students begin in the fall semester, continue through the spring, take a full course load in the summer, and finish at the end of the following fall.

Team Consulting Project
The Heller MBA culminates in the team consulting project: a real-world, practical experience where students have the opportunity to apply the analytical and problem-solving skills they have developed at Heller to an organization or business unit pursuing a social mission. Working under the supervision of a faculty adviser, students work in teams of three to five, providing management consulting services to a variety of organizations and agencies over a four-month period. By working with real organizations that are facing human resource, operational, financial, strategic, and other management challenges, students are better prepared to function as successful professionals after graduation.


Requirements for the Dual Degree of Master of Business Administration/MD with Tufts University School of Medicine


Admission
MD/MBA applicants may apply via the online Tufts University School of Medicine secondary application at any time during the application cycle. (Space is limited in the program so applying early is recommended.) Students' applications are reviewed by the Heller MBA committee after they are offered admission to the medical school. Please note that the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is not required for admission to the MD/MBA program. During the first summer, students are required to take the GMAT (if not already taken) as a condition of their full matriculation at Brandeis University. Test scores will be sent directly to the Heller School by GMAC, the Graduate Management Admission Council. The GMAT code for the Heller School at Brandeis University is 3FD-ZX-31. For further information, see the GMAT website at www.mba.com/mba/TaketheGMAT.  

For more information on MD Program Admissions, visit the Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM) Admissions site: www.tufts.edu/med/admissions/md/index.html

Degree Requirements
The dual degree requires 65 MBA credits, including 39 credits in the core curriculum and 26 health-specific classes. The program is usually completed in four years including two summers of intense course work. The MBA portion of this program culminates in a Team Consulting Project (TCP).
 

Team Consulting Project

The Heller MBA culminates in the team consulting project: a real-world, practical experience where students have the opportunity to apply the analytical and problem-solving skills they have developed at Heller to an organization or business unit pursuing a social mission. Working under the supervision of a faculty adviser, students work in teams of three to five, providing management consulting services to a variety of organizations over a four-month period. By working with real organizations that are facing human resource, operational, financial, strategic, and other management challenges, students are better prepared to function as successful professionals after graduation.  


Requirements for the Dual Degree of Master of Business Administration/MS in Biomedical Sciences (MBS) with Tufts University School of Medicine


Admission
MBS/MBA applicants may apply via the online Tufts University School of Medicine secondary application at any time during the application cycle. (Space is limited in the program so applying early is recommended.) Students' applications are reviewed by the Heller MBA committee after they are offered admission to the medical school. Please note that the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is not required for admission to the MBS/MBA program. During the first summer, students are required to take the GMAT (if not already taken) as a condition of their full matriculation at Brandeis University. Test scores will be sent directly to the Heller School by GMAC, Graduate Management Admission Council. The GMAT code for the Heller School at Brandeis University is 3FD-ZX-31. For further information, see the GMAT website at www.mba.com/mba/TaketheGMAT.

For more information on MD Program Admissions, visit the Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM) Admissions site: www.tufts.edu/med/admissions/md/index.html

Degree Requirements
The dual degree requires 20 MBA credits, including 42 credits in the core curriculum and 14 health-specific classes and 64 elective credits. The program is usually completed in two years including two summers of intense course work. The MBA portion of this program culminates in a Team Consulting Project (TCP).

Team Consulting Project
The Heller MBA culminates in the team consulting project: a real-world, practical experience where students have the opportunity to apply the analytical and problem-solving skills they have developed at Heller to an organization or business unit pursuing a social mission. Working under the supervision of a faculty adviser, students work in teams of three to five, providing management consulting services to a variety of organizations over a four-month period. By working with real organizations that are facing human resource, operational, financial, strategic, and other management challenges, students are better prepared to function as successful professionals after graduation.


Requirements for the Dual Degree of Master of Business Administration/Master of Arts in Sustainable International Development


Admission
All applications for dual degrees will be reviewed by the admissions committee of each program, using the same standards for admission that are used for all other degree applicants. If a student does not meet the criteria for admission to one of the degree programs, the student will retain the option of attending the program to which he or she is accepted. This dual-degree option is restricted to MA students who spend the second year in residence and students admitted to the accelerated MA program. Students in the dual degree must take the GMAT or GRE.

Degree Requirements
The dual degree requires eighty-two course credits comprised of specific MA/SID courses totaling eighteen credits, and specific MBA courses totaling fifty-two credits. The remaining credits are taken as MA/SID electives. The program is usually completed in five semesters, including one summer of course work. This program culminates in both a Team Consulting Project (TCP) and Master’s paper and Capstone presentation. 

Team Consulting Project
The Heller MBA culminates in the team consulting project: a real-world, practical experience where students have the opportunity to apply the analytical and problem-solving skills they have developed at Heller to an organization or business unit pursuing a social mission. Working under the supervision of a faculty adviser, students work in teams of three to five, providing management consulting services to a variety of organizations and agencies over a four-month period. By working with real organizations that are facing human resource, operational, financial, strategic, and other management challenges, students are better prepared to function as successful professionals after graduation.

Master's Paper
Students pursuing the dual degree are required to write a master’s paper that applies development theory and skills to solving a real development problem recently encountered in their own work.

Residence Requirement
Full-time students must be in residence for a minimum of twenty months and complete all degree requirements within five years. Full-time students begin in the fall semester, continue through the spring, take a full course load in the summer, and finish at the end of the following spring.


Requirements for the Dual Degree of Master of Business Administration/Master of Science in International Health Policy and Management


Admission
All applications for dual degrees will be reviewed by the admissions committee of each program, using the same standards for admission that are used for all other degree applicants. If a student does not meet the criteria for admission to one of the degree programs, the student will retain the option of attending the program to which he or she is accepted. Students in the dual degree must take the GMAT or GRE.

Degree Requirements
The dual degree requires eighty-four course credits comprised of specific MS/IHPM courses totaling fourteen credits, and specific MBA courses totaling fifty-six credits. The remaining credits are taken as electives. The program is usually completed in five semesters including the summer between years one and two.

Team Consulting Project
The Heller MBA culminates in the team consulting project: a real-world, practical experience where students have the opportunity to apply the analytical and problem-solving skills they have developed at Heller to an organization or business unit pursuing a social mission. Working under the supervision of a faculty adviser, students work in teams of three to five, providing management consulting services to a variety of organizations and agencies over a four-month period. By working with real organizations that are facing human resource, operational, financial, strategic, and other management challenges, students are better prepared to function as successful professionals after graduation.

Residence Requirement
Students must be in residence for a minimum of twenty months and complete all degree requirements within five years. Full-time students begin in the fall semester, continue through the spring, take a full course load in the summer, and finish at the end of the following spring.


Requirements for the Dual Degree of Master of Business Administration/Master of Coexistence and Conflict


Admission
All applications for dual degrees will be reviewed by the admissions committee of each program, using the same standards for admission that are used for all other degree applicants. If a student does not meet the criteria for admission to one of the degree programs, the student will retain the option of attending the program to which he or she is accepted. Students in the dual degree must take the GMAT or GRE.

Degree Requirements
The dual degree requires 90 credits comprised of specific MA COEX courses totaling thirty-eight credits, and specific MBA courses totaling fifty-two credits. The program is usually completed in six semesters including two summers.

Team Consulting Project
The Heller MBA culminates in the team consulting project: a real-world, practical experience where students have the opportunity to apply the analytical and problem-solving skills they have developed at Heller to an organization or business unit pursuing a social mission. Working under the supervision of a faculty adviser, students work in teams of three to five, providing management consulting services to a variety of organizations and agencies over a four-month period. By working with real organizations that are facing human resource, operational, financial, strategic, and other management challenges, students are better prepared to function as successful professionals after graduation.

Master's Project and Paper
All students are required to complete an internship or independent fieldwork, with a concluding paper written under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Students must develop an MA project designed to test their application of theory to practice, to expand their policy and practical experience, and, under supervision, to increase their security and comfort levels at working in what is usually a contentious and sometimes dangerous field. In addition, the field project is planned to test and improve the breadth and depth of students' professional skills and to significantly increase their networks of collaboration.

The project will consist of either of the following options:
A. An internship of at least three months in a governmental or nongovernmental organization assisting with the development and implementation of a policy or a program of coexistence intervention. Students will (1) identify an intervention or their particular part of an intervention; (2) set objectives and time lines; (3) secure partners where necessary for its implementation; (4) ensure that appropriate monitoring and evaluating techniques are built into the program design; and (5) write a final report on the intervention.

B. Independent fieldwork for at least three months in a conflict area. Such fieldwork will be designed to assist the generation and development of new coexistence and conflict management intervention options, and must be undertaken in partnership with policymakers or practitioners who are already working in the area. The report of this fieldwork includes feedback and evaluations from prospective partners already working in the area. Students who are on a sabbatical from their place of employment, and whose courses of study are funded by that employer, may carry out their project either within, or on behalf of, their sponsoring organization with the approval of the program director. The option of doing a Master’s thesis as a final output of the independent field research must be approved by the COEX program.

Residence Requirement
Students must be in residence for a minimum of twenty months and complete all degree requirements within five years. Full-time students begin in the fall semester, continue through the spring, take a full course load in the summer, and finish at the end of the following summer.


Requirements for the Dual Degree of Master of Arts in Coexistence and Conflict and International Law and Human Rights with the University of Peace


Program of Study
This dual-degree program requires a minimum of 80 credit hours usually taken during 21 months, or over five consecutive semesters. Participants spend their first year (August to May) at Brandeis University learning the foundations of coexistence and conflict resolution. Students then embark on their COEX three month summer practicum (between May to August). Following their field project, students spend the next two semesters (August to May) at the University for Peace studying international law and human rights, and completing their COEX Master’s Paper. They share their findings with other COEX students through Skype or other means when the Capstone is taking place.

Admission
The course of study is dependent upon the student being admitted to each of the individual programs. There are three options for entrance into the dual degree program:

1. Simultaneous application and admission to each program prior to being enrolled in any Heller program, with a prospective first year at Brandeis and a second at UPeace

2. Application to the Brandeis MA COEX program when a student is already enrolled in a UPeace MA program

3. Application to the UPeace MA program when a student is already enrolled in the MA COEX program

In each case, the student must fulfill all requirements for admission to both programs. Participants who have successfully completed this dual-degree program receive an MA in Coexistence from Brandeis University and an MA in International Law and Human Rights from the University for Peace.

Master's Project and Paper
All students are required to complete an internship or independent fieldwork, with a concluding paper written under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Students must develop an MA project designed to test their application of theory to practice, to expand their policy and practical experience, and, under supervision, to increase their security and comfort levels at working in what is usually a contentious and sometimes dangerous field. In addition, the field project is planned to test and improve the breadth and depth of students' professional skills and to significantly increase their networks of collaboration.

The project will consist of either of the following options:
A. An internship of at least three months in a governmental or nongovernmental organization assisting with the development and implementation of a policy or a program of coexistence intervention. Students will (1) identify an intervention or their particular part of an intervention; (2) set objectives and time lines; (3) secure partners where necessary for its implementation; (4) ensure that appropriate monitoring and evaluating techniques are built into the program design; and (5) write a final report on the intervention.

B. Independent fieldwork for at least three months in a conflict area. Such fieldwork will be designed to assist the generation and development of new coexistence and conflict management intervention options, and must be undertaken in partnership with policymakers or practitioners who are already working in the area. The report of this fieldwork includes feedback and evaluations from prospective partners already working in the area. Students who are on a sabbatical from their place of employment, and whose courses of study are funded by that employer, may carry out their project either within, or on behalf of, their sponsoring organization with the approval of the program director. The option of doing a Master’s thesis as a final output of the independent field research must be approved by the COEX program.


Requirements for the Dual Degree of Master of Arts/Master of Business Administration (Hornstein MA in Jewish Professional Leadership and the Heller School for Social Policy and Management MA/MBA Program)


Admission
Students applying to this program must demonstrate professional and academic capability and the capacity for sustaining an intensive program of study. Applicants must submit a single application to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

Program of Study
This program prepares professional leaders with the full complement of business and nonprofit skills, as well as specialized knowledge of Judaic studies and contemporary Jewish life. The program blends the Heller School's management curriculum with the Hornstein program's integrated approach to Jewish leadership training. Graduates of the dual-degree program receive two master's degrees: a Master of Arts in Jewish professional leadership from the Hornstein program and an MBA from the Heller School for Social Policy and Management.

Degree Requirements
The dual degree requires eighty course credits comprised of specific Hornstein courses totaling approximately thirty-six credits and specific Heller courses totaling thirty-eight credits. The remaining credits are taken as electives. The program is usually completed in four and a half semesters, including part of the summer between years one and two.

Supervised Professional Field Experience
Supervised professional field experience forms an important part of the Hornstein program. It is designed to immerse students in the best professional practices within the Jewish community, and to help students refine their practical skills, learn to turn theory into action, and become self-reflective and effective practitioners.

Field experience usually takes place in the summer and/or second year of the program and usually consists of approximately 125-250 hours of work managing a project jointly created by the student, the Hornstein faculty, and the supervisor in the field organization.

Myra Kraft Seminar in Israel
Students take a classroom seminar and then travel to Israel as a required part of the curriculum to examine contemporary issues in Israeli society and its relationship with diaspora communities.

Language Requirement
All students are expected to know the Hebrew alphabet prior to beginning their studies. Proficiency in modern Hebrew at a level comparable to one year of Brandeis University training is required for graduation. Students not meeting this requirement upon entrance are required to enroll in courses in Hebrew language during their academic residency. Students may fulfill the Hebrew language requirement by passing (B- or above) a 20-level or higher Hebrew course.

Cocurricular Requirements

Betty Starr Colloquium
Students spend four days during their first academic year in New York City visiting the national offices of major and start-up Jewish organizations to explore aspects of the communal agenda with agency executives.

Milender Seminar in Jewish Communal Leadership
Students participate in a three-day seminar about Jewish leadership with an outstanding leader of the Jewish communal world.

Residence Requirement
The residence requirement is 4.5 semesters of full-time study or the equivalent thereof in part-time study. Students must complete all degree requirements within five years.


Requirements for the Dual Degree of Master of Business Administration and Master of Public Policy


Program of Study
This intensive program requires six semesters (102 credits), including one summer. Students in the dual degree program are required to complete both the Team Consulting Project (TCP) and the MPP Capstone paper.

Students in the dual degree program may choose either track--beginning with the MPP curriculum or beginning with the MBA curriculum. In each case, dual-degree students must fulfill requirements for admission to both programs, including taking either the GRE or the GMAT. Dual degree students are still required to choose a concentration and complete 12 credits in their concentration.

Residence Requirement
Students must be in residence for six semesters of full-time study and complete all degree requirements within five years.


Requirements for the Dual Degree of Master of Business Administration and Master of Science in Biotechnology


Admission
Applicants to this program must fulfill all requirements for admission to both programs. Students already enrolled in the MS BIOT program who desire to enter the MBA program will be required to take the GMAT or GRE.

Degree Requirements
The dual degree requires ninety-four course credits comprised of specific MBA courses totaling fifty-four credits and specific biology and biochemistry courses totaling twenty-eight credits. The remaining credits are taken as electives. The program is usually completed in six consecutive semesters, including two summers. Students in the dual degree program may choose either track--beginning with the MBA curriculum and matriculating in the summer or beginning with the MS curriculum and matriculating in the fall.


Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in International Health Policy and Management


Program of Study
Students must successfully complete a combination of 8 full-semester or equivalent module courses (32 credits) within their year in residence. Of the 32 total credits, students will need to complete 20 credits of core courses that focus on three main areas: understanding the design and financing of health systems ,analytical skills and public healthth and (20 credits). For the additional 12 credits, students can elect to take courses with a focus on either policy, management or development. Participatory skill-building workshops complement classroom learning about health management and human resource management.

Residence Requirement
One year in residence as a full-time student.


Requirements for the Dual Degree of Master of Arts/Master of Public Policy (Hornstein MA in Jewish Professional Leadership and the Heller School for Social Policy and Management MPP Program)


Admission
Students applying to this program must demonstrate professional and academic capability and the capacity for sustaining an intensive program of study. Applicants must submit a single application to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

Program of Study
This program prepares professional leaders with the full complement of policy analysis and development skills, as well as specialized knowledge of Judaic studies and contemporary Jewish life. The program blends the Heller School's public policy curriculum with the Hornstein program's integrated approach to Jewish leadership training. Graduates of the dual-degree program receive two master’s degrees: a Master of Arts in Jewish professional leadership from the Hornstein program and a Master of Public Policy from the Heller School for Social Policy and Management.

Degree Requirements
The dual Master of Arts in Jewish Professional Leadership/Master of Public Policy is a rigorous, interdisciplinary degree program that provides students with the skills necessary for advanced careers in the government, nonprofit, and private sectors.

The dual degree requires eighty course credits comprised of specific Hornstein courses totaling approximately thirty-six credits and specific Heller courses totaling approximately thirty-six credits. The remaining credits are taken as electives. The program is usually completed in 4.5 semesters, including the summer between years one and two.

Dual-degree students must meet the MPP second-year capstone requirement and will generally focus their papers on Jewish community-related policy. Capstone advisers will include the instructor of the capstone seminar and a designee from the Hornstein program.

Supervised Professional Field Experience
Supervised professional field experience forms an important part of the Hornstein program. It is designed to immerse students in the best professional practices within the Jewish community, and to help students refine their practical skills, learn to turn theory into action, and become self-reflective and effective practitioners.

Field experience usually takes place in the summer and/or second year of the program and usually consists of approximately 125-250 hours of work managing a project jointly created by the student, the Hornstein faculty, and the supervisor in the field organization.

Myra Kraft Seminar in Israel
Students take a classroom seminar and then travel to Israel as a required part of the curriculum to examine contemporary issues in Israeli society and its relationship with diaspora communities.

Language Requirement
All students are expected to know the Hebrew alphabet prior to beginning their studies. Proficiency in modern Hebrew at a level comparable to one year of Brandeis University training is required for graduation. Students not meeting this requirement upon entrance are required to enroll in courses in Hebrew language during their academic residency. Students may fulfill the Hebrew language requirement by passing (B- or above) a 20-level or higher Hebrew course.

Cocurricular Requirements

Betty Starr Colloquium
Students spend four days during their first academic year in New York City visiting the national offices of major and start-up Jewish organizations to explore aspects of the communal agenda with agency executives.

Milender Seminar in Jewish Communal Leadership
Students participate in a three-day seminar about Jewish leadership with an outstanding leader of the Jewish communal world.

Residence Requirement
The residence requirement is 4.5 semesters of full-time study or the equivalent thereof in part-time study. Students must complete all degree requirements within five years.


Requirements for the Degree of Master of Public Policy


Program of Study
Students must successfully complete sixteen courses (64 credits). The core curriculum fits into three categories: concepts, methods, and tools. Ten courses are required. A minimum of three courses is required in a student’s chosen concentration, allowing for three electives. Concentrations include: health; behavioral health; children, youth, and families; poverty alleviation; aging; and women's and gender studies. Students who are undecided or interested in designing their own concentration in an area of social policy may concentrate in general social policy. A final capstone paper is also required.

Residence Requirement
Two years in residence as a full-time student and completion of all degree requirements within five years.

Capstone Paper
In addition to course work, students will complete a capstone paper with the guidance of faculty and senior research advisers in the various concentrations, working closely with the Heller School’s research institutes and centers.


Requirements for the Dual Degree of Master of Business Administration and Master of Public Policy


Program of Study
This intensive program requires six semesters (102 credits), including one summer. Students in the dual degree program are required to complete both the Team Consulting Project (TCP) and the MPP Capstone paper.

Students in the dual degree program may choose either track--beginning with the MPP curriculum or beginning with the MBA curriculum. In each case, dual-degree students must fulfill requirements for admission to both programs, including taking either the GRE or the GMAT. Dual degree students are still required to choose a concentration and complete 12 credits in their concentration.

Residence Requirement
Students must be in residence for six semesters of full-time study and complete all degree requirements within five years.


Requirements for the Joint Degree of Master of Public Policy & Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies


Admission
Applicants must submit a single application to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Applications are due February 1st. Applicants must submit a critical writing sample not to exceed 35 pages; the 35-page maximum may consist of a single critical essay or two shorter essays of approximately equal length.

Program of Study
Students choosing the joint degree must complete all MPP Core requirements as described above, as well as the following:

A. WMGS 205a.

B. A course in feminist research methodologies (WMGS 208b, the Feminist Inquiry course offered through the Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies, or an alternative).

C. Two elective graduate courses in women's, gender, and sexuality studies (one inside the Heller School and one outside the Heller School). Normally, only one of these courses may be a Directed Reading course.

D. Joint MA Paper Requirement: The MPP Capstone paper can fulfill this requirement as long as it is on a topic related to the joint degree. The paper will be read by two faculty members, at least one of whom is a member of the Heller School faculty, and at least one of whom is a member of the Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies core or associate faculty.

E. Courses in both programs will be reviewed to determine which would satisfy the requirements for both programs.

Residence Requirement
Students must be in residence for two full academic years and complete all degree requirements within five years.


Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Social Policy


Program of Study
Students entering the PhD program in social policy must complete a total of fifteen courses (60 credits) as approved by the program director. Successful completion of a doctoral seminar related to one’s area of concentration is also required. Students may specialize in health or behavioral health; children, youth, and families; assets and inequalities; or global health and development.

A systematic review of the PhD curriculum was undertaken to ensure the program best meets the needs of our students. Based on this review changes will be made that will apply to the incoming class of Fall 2014. The changes do not affect the number of required courses that will still remain at 15 courses.

Residence Requirement
The minimum residence for the PhD is two years.

Qualifying Paper
Upon completion of course work, each student must complete an integrative comprehensive paper. This paper is usually administered at the end of the student's fourth semester.

Language Requirement
There is no foreign language requirement for the PhD degree.

Dissertation and Final Oral Examination
A dissertation proposal should be submitted within two years after the comprehensive paper is completed. The dissertation committee consists of four members—at least two members from the Heller faculty and at least one member from outside of the Heller School or outside the university. Students may elect to write the dissertation in either a three-paper academic-journal format or the monograph format. To be granted the degree, the student is required to defend the dissertation in a public final oral examination.


Requirements for the Joint Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Social Policy and Sociology


The PhD in Social Policy and Sociology is a joint degree of the Department of Sociology and the Heller School for Social Policy and Management. Students are encouraged to apply during the first year of study in either department. The application deadline is April 1 for the following September. Students are responsible for obtaining a letter of recommendation from their program director. If the student is accepted by the complementary department (admission is not guaranteed), the following procedures apply.

Program of Study
Students entering the joint PhD program in social policy and sociology are expected to complete a total of eighteen courses (72 credits). At least nine of these courses must be offered by the Brandeis sociology department—four of these courses must be graduate seminars and the remaining five may be advanced undergraduate/graduate seminars or directed readings; at least one of these must be a sociology theory course. A minimum of nine courses (36 credits) must be taken within the Heller School. A list of required courses is available from the Heller PhD program. In addition, in their first year, students are required to participate in a year-long, noncredit proseminar in the sociology department that introduces the program's faculty and their research interests. Students are also required to take a noncredit doctoral seminar at the Heller School for two semesters.

Students are assigned advisers from the sociology department and from the Heller School. Advisers in both departments work together with students to assure appropriate coherency in their program of courses. An interdepartmental meeting between advisers and students should take place at least once a year.

Residence Requirement
The minimum residence for the joint PhD degree is three years.

Language Requirement
There is no foreign language requirement for the joint PhD degree.

Qualifying Examinations
Each student must complete a comprehensive paper as required in the Heller School curriculum. Students must also show competence in two areas of sociology as certified through the Qualifying Portfolio and Defense (QPD) Committee process. Students elect two areas of interest and develop a contractual set of requirements with a faculty member of each area. When both QPDs are completed, there is a meeting (typically one to two hours) to discuss the student's interests, directions in the field, and the upcoming dissertation.

Dissertation and the Final Oral Examination
A dissertation proposal should be submitted soon after the comprehensive examination and GACs are completed. The dissertation committee should consist of five members—two faculty members each from the sociology department and the Heller School and one outside member. The joint PhD dissertation may be accepted by the sociology department and the Heller School upon the recommendation of the dissertation committee. To be granted the degree, the student is required to defend the dissertation in a public final oral examination.


Special Notes Relating to the Doctoral Program


PhD students may receive an MA in social policy once they have successfully completed all required course work and passed the comprehensive exam.

Alternately, students enrolled in the PhD program in social policy may elect to pursue a joint master's degree in social policy & women's and gender studies, with the program director's permission as well as the agreement of the women's and gender studies program. This degree option replaces a master's degree in social policy in the student's program and is entered prior to the award of a doctoral degree in social policy. The joint degree provides students an opportunity to mesh the Heller School’s social policy research and analytical training with issues that affect women and gender. The joint MA is for a select group of students interested in pursuing an additional interdisciplinary perspective. Students in the program must be willing to do additional course work, take part in a proseminar, and write a master's paper.

Information about Courses

Listed on the following pages are graduate courses of instruction for the Heller School for Social Policy and Management. Courses meet for three hours a week unless otherwise specified.

Most courses are available to all students qualified to take them. Access to some courses is governed by the signature of the instructor. Other courses impose a numerical limit to preserve environmental conditions suitable to the pedagogy the instructor employs; students increase their chances of gaining enrollment in such courses by participating in pre-enrollment.

Generally, a course is offered with the frequency indicated at the end of its description. The frequency may be designated as every semester, every year, every second year, every third year, or every fourth year.

Courses numbered 100-199 are for undergraduate and graduate students; and courses numbered 200 and above are primarily for graduate students. Undergraduates may not enroll in courses numbered 200 or higher without the written permission of the instructor.

Suffixes after course numbers have the following meanings:

A or B Semester course
C Semester course meeting throughout the year
D Full-year course
E Intensive course, two semester course credits in one semester
F Half-semester course, half-course credit
G Quarter-course credit

A semester course carries one semester course credit (four semester-hour credits) and a full-year course carries two semester course credits (eight semester-hour credits). Exceptions are noted under the individual course descriptions. Certain courses factor toward rate of work and do not carry course credit toward degree requirements. Occasionally, courses are awarded additional semester-hour credits, yet count as only one semester course toward degree requirements. All such courses are specifically identified in the course listing. Certain courses require a laboratory course taken concurrently.

A student may take either half of a full-year course with a D suffix for credit with the approval and consent of the course instructor on the appropriate form designated by the Office of the University Registrar. Students who enrolled in full-year courses in the fall term are continued in the spring term automatically.

The university reserves the right to make any changes in the offerings without prior notice.

Courses of Instruction

(100-199) For Both Undergraduate and Graduate Students

HS 104b American Health Care
[ ss ]
Examines and critically analyzes the United States health care system, emphasizing the major trends and issues that have led to the current sense of "crisis." In addition to providing a historical perspective, this course will establish a context for analyzing the current, varied approaches to health care reform. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Altman

HS 110a Wealth and Poverty
[ ss ]
Examines why the gap between richer and poorer citizens appears to be widening in the United States and elsewhere, what could be done to reverse this trend, and how the widening disparity affects major issues of public policy. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Shapiro

HS 120a Race and the Law
[ ss ]
Explores how race has been defined and used to uphold or undermine the principles espoused in the Constitution and other sources of the law in the United States. Issues discussed range from treatment of Native Americans at the nation's birth to the modern concept of affirmative action. One of our premises is that ideally the law represents the synthesis of the narratives of various elements of a society. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Hill

HS 124a Dilemmas of Long-Term Care
[ ss ]
Fifty million Americans have a disability. What kinds of help do they want? What are the responsibilities of families, friends, and communities to help? Current U.S. approaches to service delivery, financing, and organization are reviewed and alternatives considered. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Leutz

HS 143a Social Justice and Philanthropy
[ ss ]
May not be taken for credit by students who took SOC 143a in prior years.
Examines the role of philanthropy in American society including individual, institutional, and societal-level factors that affect philanthropic efforts to create social change and the relationship between social justice and philanthropy. Students explore philanthropy from both theoretical and practical perspectives using an academic framework grounded in sociological theory and a semester-long experiential learning exercise in real-dollar grantmaking. Usually offered every year.
Staff

(200 and above) Primarily for Graduate Students

HRNS/HS 232a Team Consulting Project Workshop
Corequisite: Concurrent registration with HS 299b. Yields half-course credit.
A series of sessions designed to provide students with the team building and consulting skills necessary to meet the team consulting projects client needs and provide them with tools that will be useful throughout their careers. Several sessions will enable teams to share their experiences with other teams and problem solve as a group. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Bailis, Ms. Carlson and Ms. Smith

HS 200f Social Movements for Emancipatory Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Students study theories of social mobilization; explore the relationships and tensions between state and non-state actors in social movements including NGOs, people’s movements, and religious groups; study selected social movements for their lessons for sustainable development process, failures, and achievements; and articulate their own “theories of change” about the role of social movements around critical problems for social inclusion. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Simon

HS 201f Corruption, Government Integrity, and Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines the ways in which corruption -- usually defined as the abuse of public or other entrusted authority for private gain -- is correlated with government dysfunction or lack of integrity, whether in the form of patronage, clientelism, shirking, self-dealing, or various forms of bribery, extortion, and misappropriation. The course also looks at the underlying political economy and incentive structures that give rise to such loss or absence of governmental integrity; including deficiencies in accountability, oversight, and above all, political and economic competition. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Russell-Einhorn

HS 202f Climate Change, Global Governance, and Justice
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Focuses on issues relating to climate governance, loss, and damage regulations, which are challenges faced globally. The course examines how responsibilities, burdens, benefits and risks for climate change should be divided between countries and people. Students use a problem-solving approach to analyze real-world examples to propose just and innovative solutions. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Papa

HS 204f Education, Gender and Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Reviews the relationship between gender access to education and development indicators such as reduced fertility, improved health, and women's access to employment, income, and decision-making. Students look at the broader factors behind these links, and at issues that prevent education from playing the expected role in overcoming inequalities and building human and social capital in developing countries. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Epinosa

HS 205f Organizational Management for Development Practitioners
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Introduces challenges faced by managers in international and local development organizations and provides an opportunity for interactive learning of skill sets required to overcome these challenges. Students examine elements of new public management such as performance management, privatization, and partnerships and the changing role played by NGOs in development practice. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Assan

HS 206f Sustainable Agriculture and Watersheds
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Focuses on scientific principles and basic practices of sustainable agriculture and its links to watershed management, soil conservation, and landscape ecology. Topics include how sustainable agriculture links to management of water and watersheds, integrated watershed management, hydrologic cycles, and the relation of surface water and groundwater resources to agricultural productivity, ecology, and social justice. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Ellsworth

HS 207f Ecology of Health
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Develops an ecological view of the causes of good or poor health by considering aspects of “macro-habitats” that include air, water, and the multitude of other life that lives around, on, and in us. The course looks at unexpected health consequences of the modern built environment where people have achieved “the good life” with safe water, roads, cheap food, and a car in every driveway. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Olson

HS 208f Systems Solutions to Disastrous Climate Change
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Focuses on known and rapidly improving sustainable renewable energy technologies such as solar, wind, hydro, geothermal, tidal, biofuels, advanced nuclear, along with methods of energy storage, improved infrastructure, energy conservation, and demand management. Economic policies that will have the most impact on rapidly developing, urbanizing, and polluting industrialized areas are also examined. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Abt

HS 209f Community Health in Conflict Situations
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Provides an overview of key issues related to provision of health care in a conflict situation and different approaches on addressing them illustrated by real life examples. Internal conflicts are taking a heavy toll in people’s lives, livelihoods, and assets - both physical and social. Students will examine the challenges development practitioners working in conflict situations face in meeting basic health needs of affected people. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Ariyaratne

HS 210a Coexistence and Conflict: Theory and Analysis
Open only to students enrolled in the MA program in coexistence and conflict. Other students considered with permission of the instructor. May not be taken for credit by students who took COEX 210a in prior years.
Addresses the current and emerging context of intercommunal conflict around the world and the varying and developing theoretical approaches to the emergence and resolution of such conflicts. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Fitzduff

HS 211f Agriculture and Rural Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Provides an overview of the impact of development policy on agriculture and rural sectors, consequences of neglecting these sectors, and policy responses in developing countries. Topics include household economics, rural production systems, land tenure, rural markets and institutions, rural poverty and inequality, the environment, and the role of institutions. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Assan

HS 212f Practicum Structure and Design
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
In order to give students a clear set of guidelines around the Practicum process, this course is designed for and limited to COEX and SIDCO students as a prerequisite to selecting, planning and designing a practicum in order to fulfill their degree requirements. The course is designed with mixed content including presentations by faculty, practice experts from humanitarian organizations and governmental agencies, career counseling and planning professionals, former students and other subject matter experts relevant to providing students with clear and rigorous guidance towards making a practicum selection that best suits their needs, capacities and career plans. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Johnson

HS 213f Development in Latin America
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Introduces students to the region’s challenges and potential for development, resulting from its history, diversity, and inequality. The course reviews the legacy of colonialism and post-colonialism in terms of the exclusionary nature of national states, the shift from import substitution industrialization to neo-liberal restructuring, the limits and resilience of local livelihoods, and challenges brought by social movements and civil society. Not offered in 2014-2015.
Ms. Espinosa

HS 214f Environmental Economics and Policy
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Introduces students to economic perspectives on modern environmental issues. Students study economic theories related to natural resources, with an emphasis on the strengths and weaknesses of economic models. Students learn that economic objectives do not necessarily conflict with environmental goals, and that markets can be harnessed to efficiently improve environmental quality. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Roach

HS 215b Corporate Finance
Prerequisites: HS 250a and HS 246b.
Introduces the modern theory of corporate finance and the institutional background of financial instruments and markets. Considers ways to measure value. Explores alternative forms of financing and ways to analyze them. Considers the financing tools appropriate for for-profit and nonprofit organizations.
Mr. Friedman

HS 215f Natural and Field Experiments in Development: Design, Implementation and Limits
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines the use of experiments to gauge effectiveness of development interventions to better understand what works and does not work in development. Students study conceptual and statistical principles behind natural and field experiments, look at recent examples and debates about their limits, and carry out a hands-on exercise in designing and conducting a field experiment. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Godoy

HS 216f Trade and Natural Resources: A Sustainable Development Perspective
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines trade and environment from the perspective of sustainable development and potential for poverty alleviation. This course flows from understanding that the trade and environment policy debate has become highly specialized. As a result, it is imposing stress on developing countries to participate in these discussions and influencing policy to become ever narrower and, therefore, missing connections central to resolving challenges. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Boyer

HS 217f Eli J. Segal Seminar in Citizen Leadership
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Engages students in a rigorous examination of the concepts of Citizen Leadership and Citizen Service, as they have been used in the past, in an effort to support them in integrating these ideas into their career plans and personal development. Each session will involve readings on a specific aspect of Citizen Leadership or Service and an opportunity to discuss these aspects with guest speakers and resources, most of whom are Segal Program Founders, men and women who have exemplified them. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Bailis and Ms. Schwarzenbach

HS 218a Coexistence and Conflict Field Practicum
Open only to Coexistence and Conflict Students. Offered exclusively on a credit/no-credit basis.
Usually offered every year.
Mr. Johnson

HS 218f Communications for Impact
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Provides practical communication skills essential to advocate for social change including the importance of clear electronic and written public media; developing cogent arguments address policy or program challenges at the local, national, or international level; and the ability to communicate positions and potential solutions in a concise convincing manner. Students explore a variety of modern communication methods. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Arena-DeRosa

HS 219f Transitional Justice: Introduction
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Transitional justice is a relatively new and growing interdisciplinary field of study placed at the intersection between international law and justice, politics, human rights and conflict and peace studies. This module introduces the concept and practices of transitional justice. We review the various mechanisms of transitional justice, including: criminal prosecution; purges and lustrations; truth and reconciliation commissions; reparations and compensation schemes; revisions of national-historical narratives; official apologies; and, public commemoration. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Hirsch

HS 220a Strategies for Coexistence Interventions
Prerequisite: HS 210a. Open only to students enrolled in the MA program in coexistence and conflict. Other students considered with permission of the instructor. May not be taken for credit by students who took COEX 220a in prior years.
Studies the utilization of a variety of multifaceted approaches to policy and practice in coexistence and conflict interventions, as well as the strategic design and evaluation of such interventions. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Fitzduff

HS 220f Economics, Environment, and Energy: The Trilemma
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines renewable energy technologies, their economic implications, and available applications in agriculture, industry, and transportation. Topics examined include electric power for transportation, wind turbine infrastructure, improved battery technologies, sustainable construction and housing, and emerging technologies of large-scale biomass, hydrogen-fuel generation, and carbon fuel replacement. Not offered in 2014-2015.
Mr. Abt

HS 221f Household Economics
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. May not be repeated by students who have taken HS 259f with this topic in previous years.
Centers on (a) discussing the intuition behind concepts in household economics and (b) the applied aspects of the concepts for practitioners of development. The course is purposefully not technical and is designed for students who have taken the introductory course to economics. The course will provide a theoretical and empirical introduction to the field of household economics as well as provide practical tools to do basic analysis of intra-household gender inequalities. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Godoy

HS 222f Tourism and Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Explores the sustainability of tourism and of ecotourism in particular. The rapid growth of ecotourism is a welcome change in the global tourism industry. At its best, ecotourism aims to increase the sustainability of the travel and tour industry, and makes direct support of wildlife and habitat conservation an element of doing business. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Olson

HS 223f Gender and Development in the Context of Neoliberalism and Globalization
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Reviews connections between gender and macroeconomics and explores changes brought by globalization and neoliberal policies as they affect livelihoods, families, and gender hegemonies. The course provides a critical analytical framework to understand the role of gender within development in light of globalization, which has transformed relations between the state, markets, and civil society and the context of gender practice. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Espinosa

HS 224f Gender and the Environment
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. May not be repeated by students who have taken HS 259f with this topic in previous years.
Introduces students to the field of gender and the environment, examining the relevance of gender for environmental conservation that includes social sustainability, and the different ways gender has been conceptualized and integrated within environmental conservation and within sustainable development interventions. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Espinosa

HS 225a Fundraising and Development
Offers a basic grounding in key concepts of private fundraising and development. It explores management and leadership issues associated with the rapidly changing field of development and philanthropy, especially within development NGOs. Students learn to analyze, plan, and evaluate a comprehensive fundraising program and create a professional fundraising portfolio. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Whalen

HS 225f Measurement and Political Economy of Income Inequality, Social Capital, and Empowerment
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. May not be repeated by students who have taken HS 259f with this topic in previous years.
Exposes students to current debates about the causes and consequences of three dominant topics in development: income inequality, social capital, and empowerment. Through a combination of country case studies, this course will enhance appreciation of empirical analysis of the topics. In addition, students will be familiarized with technical aspects of how one measures income inequality, social capital, and empowerment in applied work. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Godoy

HS 226f Environment and Conflict
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines the relationship(s) and interaction(s) between conflict and the environment. Both social and ecological theoretical frameworks regarding this interaction will be explored. The course will focus on establishing a set of analytical tools that can form the basis for intervention in emerging conflicts. Usually offered every year.
Mr. van Maasakkers

HS 227f Introduction to Design, Monitoring and Evaluation of Coexistence Interventions
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Provides an introductory review of the core concepts and practical steps of design, monitoring and evaluation in the field of coexistence and peacebuilding. The course will stress participatory methods in monitoring and evaluation, in which multiple stakeholders are involved in the process of planning, collecting, interpreting, synthesizing, and using information. The course will feature case studies and actual DM&E plans and evaluation reports. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Jean

HS 228a Social Entrepreneurship
Explores how entrepreneurship has become a driving force in the social enterprise sector, provides tools for developing and evaluating new ventures, and explores the blurring line between for-profit and nonprofit social initiatives. The course also teaches hands-on social venture business plan development tools, from assessing markets to developing financial and operating plans. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Carlson

HS 228f The Paulo Freire Seminar
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Even in his own lifetime, Freire became a global icon for social movements against poverty and for unshackling of the minds of the poor. This seminar will introduce Freire’s core beliefs as presented in selections from his oeuvre including a full reading of Pedagogy of the Oppressed. Students will consider the relevance of Freire’s ideas and methods to today’s poor as well as to their own experiences of societal change. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Simon

HS 229f International Health Financing
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines the mobilization of resources for the health system as a whole and the funding of individual providers for health services in developing countries. Provides the tools for examining broad reforms as well as refinements of individual components of the health care system. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Shepard

HS 230a SID Field Practicum Course
Offered exclusively on a credit/no credit basis. May be repeated twice for credit.
Students will be evaluated based upon an approved proposal, terms of reference, and satisfactory evaluation from a field supervisor. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

HS 230f Coexistence Research Methods
Open only to students enrolled in the MA program in coexistence and conflict. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. May not be taken for credit by students who took COEX 230f in prior years.
Preparation for the research necessary for the required field project in the MA program in coexistence and conflict. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Johnson

HS 231b MBA Internship
Provides an opportunity for MBA students to carry out a formal internship with a client organization under the supervision of a faculty advisor. The internship allows students to apply principles from the MBA curriculum for a client organization. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

HS 231f MBA Internship
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. May be repeated once for credit.
Provides an opportunity for MBA students to carry out a formal internship with a client organization under the supervision of a faculty advisor. The internship allows students to apply principles from the MBA curriculum for a client organization. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

HS 232f Theories of Justice
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Explores contemporary applied ethics and political philosophy on theories of justice. Students examine moral and ontological grounds of social movements from the paradigm-forming theories of John Rawls to pioneers of different traditions and movements including Amartya Sen, Michael Sandel, Wendy Brown, Martha Nussbaum, David Crocker, Gillian Brock, Abdulaziz Sachedina, Kwame Appiah, Thich Nhat Hanh, and others. Not offered in 2014-2015.
Mr. Sampath

HS 233a Implementing Policy & Practice
Begins with definitions of policy and how policy is made from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Examines several frameworks for analyzing policy implementation and for planning implementation strategies. Several sessions will focus on the management skills and tools useful to planning and managing the implementation of policy change. Students will have the opportunity to bring conceptual knowledge and skills together in analysis of several case studies. Usually offered every year.
Staff

HS 233f Social Policy for Shared Societies
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines how labor mobility, forced migration, and refugee flows have all contributed to societies that are decreasingly homogenous. Multi ethnic, cultural and religious states are now more the rule than the exception. Accommodating, managing and appreciating such diversity in social programming has proved to be one of the major challenges that governments and societies face today. This course looks at how governments and others can develop policies and programs in e.g. development, health, the environment, business and education so that such policies can prevent societal conflicts, and assist the creation of shared rather than conflicted societies. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Fitzduff

HS 234f National Health Accounts: Applications to Low- and Middle-Income Countries
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
National Health Accounts (NHA) is a globally accepted framework and approach for measuring total national health expenditure. Provides an overview of the concepts and methodology of NHA. Students will understand the international classification systems used to categorize health expenditures, be able to construct NHA tables, and understand the uses to which NHA data can be put. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Nandakumar

HS 235f Democracy and Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines the relation between democracy and development geared for development practitioners and policy-makers. Students will discuss if democracy is essential for sustainable development and, if so, what kinds of democracy should be promoted in developing countries. The major critiques of aid and development theory rooted in secular democracy, free-market economies, and human rights will be explored. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Sampath

HS 236a International Health Systems and Development
Provides students with the framework to understand how health systems are organized and to understand what affects their performance. Students also will be able to describe key features of health systems; how health system performance is measured; and how lessons from other countries can be applied to their own countries. The course examines different health system frameworks, how to use these frameworks to ask health system questions, different aspects of health systems, how national health systems differ, and what measures are being implemented in different countries to improve their health system performance and eventually health outcomes. The course will also take a broader look at the relationships between health policy, economic policy and development policy, examining some of the main economic and development theories shaping global policies and also examine the international institutions and political dynamics in health policy making. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Bowser

HS 236f Cost Effective Solutions for Climate Change Prevention
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Explores specific global and national solutions to prevent disastrous global climate change in major cities and rural areas. The costs, risks, and benefits of regionally relevant contributions of climate-change preventing and mitigating technologies and policies are discussed. This course guides students in evaluating and applying the systems solutions that can reduce global warming, given international cooperation on mitigation. Not offered in 2014-2015.
Mr. Abt

HS 237f Applied Cost-Benefit Analysis for Development Practitioners
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Governments, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), the private sector, and international development organizations have to decide whether to invest in projects. Benefit-cost analysis has become a standard method to evaluate the net monetary benefits of a project. This course introduces students to these principles and allows them to apply them by using cost-benefit analysis to evaluate a real-world development project. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Godoy

HS 238f Evaluating Survey Data: Questioning Answers
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Exposes students to principles and practices of evaluating survey data. Governments, NGOs, international development organizations, universities, and private researchers collect more and more data through surveys. Data sets cover development topics such as public health, agriculture, environment, education, and economic indicators, so it is vital that practitioners know how to critically examine what is presented. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Godoy

HS 239f Integrated Approach to Development Practice
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines “development” from a Southern perspective and explores key challenges faced by countries in addressing key issues such as poverty, ill-health, education, food security, and governance. Innovative and effective responses to such challenges are also explored, especially successful examples of alternative approaches to development that have emerged in various parts of the developing world. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Ariyaratne

HS 240a Dialogue and Mediation Skills
Open only to students enrolled in the MA program in coexistence and conflict. Other students considered with permission of the instructor. May not be taken for credit by students who took COEX 240a in prior years.
Addresses the theoretical and practical approaches to mediation and facilitation skills for people and organizations working in areas of intercommunal conflict. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Johnson

HS 240b Professional Writing
Yields half-course credit.
Provides students with training and experience in critical reading for development purposes and in professional writing. Combining lectures, discussions, and classroom exercises in weekly class sessions, the course is based around regular written submissions on which students receive extensive feedback. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Walsh

HS 242f Development Aid
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Looks at the evolution of international development aid through multilateral, bilateral, and non-State actors; explores underlying theories of development and how theory has real world influence through aid strategies and programs; examines motivations, objectives and interests of aid programs; and introduces concepts and current debate on aid effectiveness. It helps students develop and articulate their own “theories of change” to shape aid programs toward a more sustainable development. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Simon

HS 243f Religion Identity and Conflict
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines the role that religious identity can play in both the escalation and mitigation of conflict. Students will study the role that ideology, belief, values, and faith-based relationships can play in developing and legitimizing, or in transforming and resolving, deeply rooted conflict dynamics. The focus of this course will be on both integration of religious identity factors into conflict analysis and an introduction to faith-based interventions skills, used by religious actors to foster coexistence. During the course, we will explore different types of contemporary conflict in which religion functions as a conflict driver, including how to understand and handle conflicts perpetrated by extremist religious groups. We will also explore the diversity of faith-based reconciliation processes (such as hospitality, healing ritual, apology, etc.) as well as the kinds of roles performed by a wide variety of religious actors (education, advocacy, mediation, dialogue facilitation, etc.). Examples and case studies will be drawn from a wide variety of religious traditions and diverse cultures. In addition to those cases presented in the readings and by the professor, each student will be required to select cases on which to make a class presentation and write a paper. The purpose of these assignments, and the course in general, is to provide students the opportunity to assess concrete conflict situations in which religious identity is a factor, know the potential contribution that faith-based actors can make to coexistence, and evaluate how best to function in faith-based peacebuilding roles and reconciliation processes that interest them. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Steele

HS 244a Responsible Negotiation
Provides concepts, observations and suggestions to improve analytical and operational negotiation skills. Everyone negotiates on a daily basis, but what about doing it responsibly? Faced with projects, contracts, conflicts or crises, coping with people, problems and process, how can negotiators lever the right reflections and actions in the right direction? How can they optimize utility for themselves and for others? This course also addresses negotiation foundations on how to do first things first, i.e. how to make the right moves at the right time in order to reach the right decisions and to achieve ad hoc implementation. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Lempereur

HS 244f Interdisciplinary Applied Research Design for Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Combines lectures with a hands-on approach to learning, training students to incorporate applied research into their careers as development professionals. Students learn elements of sound research design, gain skills to formulate a clear research question, select research methods, and understand the limits and potential of varied methods and the heuristics implied in the process. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Espinosa

HS 245f Economics I
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Introduces basic microeconomic concepts, including market analysis. This course demonstrates the basic problem that resources are scarce, and allows a consideration of various ways to deal with scarcity. Markets are also of direct relevance to managers. A manager, whether for-profit or nonprofit, must operate at least partially in a market environment. The market sets the constraints and provides some of the opportunities for the organization to pursue its goals. The course considers the behavior of consumers and organizations and examines how they interact with each other. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Friedman

HS 246b Statistics
Meets for 1.5 hours a week for a full semester; yields half-course credit.
Presents students with an introduction to the fundamentals of parametric statistics. Covers the essentials required for students to understand issues related to measurement and how to generate descriptive information and statistical analyses from these measurements. Focuses primarily on understanding the importance of summary measures along with a study of fundamental statistical distributions. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Fournier

HS 247f Evaluation for Managers
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Focuses on program evaluation techniques of interest to managers, including balanced scorecard methods, needs assessment, participatory evaluation methods, process/implementation analysis, impact analysis, cost-benefit analysis, and utilization-focused evaluation. These techniques are discussed in the context of building "learning organizations" that enable the organization and its managers to know whether they are succeeding. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Hahn

HS 248b Financial Management
Prerequisite: HS 250a.
Develops students as educated consumers of financial information. Covers financial management problems encountered by today's human service professionals in a real-world perspective based on sound financial and accounting theory. Includes topics such as financial statement analysis, budget development and control, managing growth, cash flow management, and management controls. Usually offered every year.
Mr. McLaughlin

HS 248f Economics II
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. Prerequisite: HS 245f. Required for all MBA students except those in the Hornstein Program.
Elaborates further on microeconomic topics related to market structure and labor markets and their relevance to managers. It also considers applications of economics to social policy. The course will examine the balance between government spending and revenues and will consider issues in tax policy. It will consider briefly the government debt, unemployment, inflation, and major macroeconomic issues. The course then returns to the economic and social policy issues of poverty and inequality. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Friedman

HS 249f Social Justice, Management, and Policy
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Allows students the opportunity to explore the management implications of "Knowledge Advancing Social Justice." Examines historical and contemporary thinkers, justice issues, and management activities. Students grapple with the daily management dilemmas faced by managers and change agents both inside and outside organizations. Usually offered every summer.
Ms. Nsiah-Jefferson

HS 250a Financial Accounting
Develops a fundamental understanding of financial accounting and reporting issues as they apply to nonprofit and for-profit organizations. Students will learn about the importance of fiscal responsibility and integrity in the efficient utilization of an organization's resources relative to organizational goals. Accounting practices that are unique to nonprofit organizations will be introduced, discussed, and differentiated from those practices employed by for-profit entities. Emphasis will be placed on interpreting financial statements to understand how accounting information, in a variety of settings, can be utilized by decision makers. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Anderson

HS 250f Intercultural Communication for Conflict and Development Practitioners
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Engages students to honor and share their own culture while developing a capacity to be inclusive of many other cultures; progress from an ethnocentric toward an ethno-relative sate of understanding and acceptance of cultural differences; view cultural differences objectively and understand that differences are not hierarchical; identify and appreciate the beliefs, values and norms of their own culture, and recognize and articulate differences and commonalities in the cultures of others; demonstrate increasing ability to communicate with non-native speakers, as well as persons who exhibit a different worldview, value system and communicative style; analyze and synthesize large amounts of disparate information to produce relevant, insightful presentations; understand the relationship between national, personal, professional and organizational cultures; and learn to appreciate the challenges and develop key skills in cross cultural dispute resolution processes. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Johnson

HS 251b Managerial Accounting
Prerequisite: HS 250a or equivalent.
Provides general introduction to the concepts, problems, and issues related to managerial accounting. Managerial accounting predominantly addresses the internal use of economic information regarding the resources used in the process of producing goods and providing services. Fundamental aspects of cost behavior and cost accounting will be discussed, but always from the perspective of the manager who must make decisions rather than the accountant who prepares the information. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Anderson

HS 252b Strategic Management
Provides students with the theoretical constructs and practical tools necessary to create and manage organizations strategically. Includes strategic process, organizational design, and development of planning tools and cycles. All students perform an applied strategic analysis for an actual organization. Usually offered every year.
Mr. McLaughlin and Ms. Carlson

HS 252f Social Marketing
Prerequisite: HS 285a or permission of the instructor. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Provides a framework for understanding target audience behavior and where best to intervene to help create positive behavior change. At the heart of our learning experience is the social marketing planning process, which is a structured approach for developing and implementing a program for behavior change. We will examine the key social marketing concepts that include competition, determinants of behavior, barriers and benefits, marketing strategy and the 4Ps or “intervention mix”. Students will have the opportunity to evaluate past programs as well as develop social marketing strategies of their own. Usually offered every year.
Staff

HS 253b Leadership and Organizational Behavior
Focuses on leadership and managing organizations. Uses cases on a variety of organizations to expose students to problems and to improve their effectiveness in analyzing, diagnosing, and leading people in organizations. Students learn organizational concepts, analytic frameworks, and models, and practice their leadership skills in class. Uses case discussions, simulations, role-playing, mini-lecturing, and experimental exercises. Provides an opportunity to develop leadership skills through group work and reflection. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Chilingerian

HS 253f HIV/AIDS and Public Policy
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Geared toward students with limited experience in HIV/AIDS as a public policy issue. In the first sessions, students learn the key perspectives to frame the HIV/AIDS epidemic as a policy issue, including an economic perspective, a social impact perspective, and a rights perspective. The second half of the course reviews lessons from the international experience in responding to the epidemic. Attention is given to sector-based interventions and necessary coordination between sectors for specific interventions to be effective. Usually offered every year.
Staff

HS 254a Human Resource Management
Considers how human resource management might aid in achieving organizational excellence. Focuses on the development of concepts and strategies that can increase effectiveness in developing policies and practices to enhance the value of people in the organizations served. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Gittell

HS 254f Governance and Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Increasingly development thinkers identify “good governance” as essential to justice and development. This course focuses on pathways to good governance, examining law, institutions, systems, leadership, politics, and culture that influence governance. Historical and current examples are used to illustrate how governance does - and does not - evolve toward ideals of good governance that enable sustainable development. Usually offered every year.
Staff

HS 255f Responsible Negotiation (1) - The Fundamentals
Everyone negotiates on a daily base, but what about doing it responsibly? Faced with projects, contracts, conflicts or crises, coping with people, problems and process, how can negotiators lever the right reflections and actions in the right direction? How can they optimize utility for themselves and for others? This course provides concepts, observations and suggestions to improve analytical and operational negotiation skills; but it also addresses negotiation foundations on how to do first things first, i.e. how to make the right moves at the right time in order to reach the right decisions and to achieve ad hoc implementation. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Lempereur

HS 256f Community Building for Managers
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Focuses on the elasticity of the term "community building," some historical themes, and how a term originally focused mostly on neighborhood revival is now also used in the context of building stronger ties among people who share specific interests and used by managers who would like to reinvent the workplace around community principles. With community building jargon increasingly entering into management and public policy literature, managers must understand the parameters of this "movement" and acquaint themselves with some of the skills and developments that people doing this work have found useful. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Hahn

HS 257b Conflict Resolution by Negotiation
Develops in students an understanding of the nature, advantages, and limitations of negotiations as a conflict resolution tool. Provides a normative and practical framework for pursuing a negotiation strategy as a method of resolving disputes. Provides students with opportunities to apply this knowledge in a variety of simulated negotiation contexts. Finally, exposes students to feedback regarding their negotiation approaches via explicit instructor evaluation and via the impact of their actions on their teammates and opponents.
Mr. Prottas

HS 258a Operations Management
Prerequisite: HS 246b.
Explores how operations management skills can help organizations to deliver high-quality services while using resources efficiently. Students develop skills including quality assessment, process mapping, productivity analysis, wait-time analysis, and scheduling. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Abbott

HS 258f Transitional Justice: The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict in Comparative Perspective
Prerequisite: HS 219f or the permission of the instructor. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Explores the applicability of the transitional justice framework and its different practices to historical and current aspects of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. We will consider how developments in international law such as the International Human Rights Regime and the ICC affect the dynamic of the conflict. Drawing on other cases of international conflict (Northern Ireland, Indonesia/ East Timor) we will evaluate which, if any, of the transitional justice practices may advance or hinder an Israeli-Palestinian negotiation process and how useful might they be for longer-term peacebuilding and reconciliation. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Hirsch

HS 260b Practicing Philanthropy
Juxtaposes a theoretical framework for understanding the economic, political, and social role of philanthropy in American society with the practical experience of real-dollar grantmaking. Through course readings and an opportunity to develop a grantmaking process that will grant real money, students will be exposed to the complexity of the philanthropic process and the challenges associated with allocating scarce resources. The course also provides opportunities to explore organizational behavior, group dynamics and individual leadership skills. Students will learn how to negotiate, reach consensus, and execute the plan they design and through readings will gain perspective on process, grantmaking, and evaluation techniques. The process will be documented by the students for use in case studies, teaching materials, and workshops. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Riccio

HS 260f Development, Aid, and Coexistence
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. May not be taken for credit by students who took COEX 260f in prior years.
Increases the knowledge and skills of students undertaking development and aid work in conflict situations. Explores how such work can address development needs, as well as the need to increase intercommunal equity, understanding, and cooperation. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Johnson

HS 261a Threats to Development: Climate Change
Takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of climate change as a long-term overarching threat to the achievement of sustainable development, integrating issues of economics, ecology, and governance. The course provides development specialists with a holistic grounding in the significant economic, social, and ecological threats and strategies to confront climate change. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Olson and Mr. Assan

HS 261f Advanced Development, Aid, and Coexistence
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. May not be taken for credit by students who took COEX 261f in prior years.
This seminar builds on the concepts and theories offered in the basic course. Students will master the skills of conflict mapping, strategic intervention, and analysis using case studies of current and past conflicts where development assistance was also required. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Johnson

HS 262f Culture, Power, and Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Students engage with constructs of cultural superiority, debate about modernization, and learn about what motivates individual and cultural change. Students are introduced to alternative theoretical approaches to culture and development and learn how to apply those theories to different historical contexts as well as contemporary situations. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Ready

HS 263f Applied Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. Prerequisite: HS 297f or permission of the instructor.
Designed for students wishing to receive advanced training in GIS. Instruction includes geospatial data management and archiving, raster and vector analysis techniques, and basic GPS instruction. Emphasis is on 'hands-on' training using ARCView GIS software; qualitative skills in data gathering, analysis, and presentation; and understanding the potential of GIS as a tool for planning and evaluating development projects. Includes a computer lab. Usually offered every year.
Staff

HS 264f Principles of Ecology for Development Practitioners
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Introduces key principles of ecology that influence sustainability of national and local development programs throughout the world. The course looks at how policies affecting our use of soils, crops, and forests play a role in development. Other topics include climate, food webs, soil fertility, population growth and stability, and species protection. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Olson

HS 265f Human Rights-Based Approach to Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Over the past two decades, international organizations, national governments, and NGOs around the world have adopted human rights frameworks, strategies, and tools to advance missions and goals. In view of the widespread adoption of such frameworks for development and social policy work, this course provides an introduction to human rights law, policy, and practice for development practitioners. Usually offered every semester.
Ms. Duger

HS 266f Introduction to Economics for Development Practitioners
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Provides a foundation in economics for discerning, creative, and forward thinking development practitioners. It explores selected economic theories, historical perspectives, empirical lessons, analytical tools, and alternative proposals that are particularly relevant to sustainable international development. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Roach

HS 267f Responsible Negotiation (2): Advanced
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Everyone negotiates on a daily base, but what about doing it responsibly? Faced with projects, contracts, conflicts or crises, coping with many dilemmas on how to deal with people, problems and process, how can negotiators leverage the right reflections and actions in the right direction? How can they optimize utility for themselves and for others, while upholding strong values and the long term for the community? This course deepens concepts, observations and suggestions to improve analytical and operational negotiation skills, as to do first things first, i.e. how to make the right moves at the right time, in order to reach the right decisions and to achieve ad hoc implementation. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Lempereur

HS 268f Rule of Law and Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Explores whether law is critical to development. If it is, how and with respect to what kind of development, and what means are available to maximize the law’s beneficial impact. Through readings, case studies, and development projects, students examine the use of the legal order to solve problems of poverty, vulnerability, and environmental degradation in developing nations. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Russell-Einhorn

HS 269f Food Security and Nutrition
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines the interconnectedness of agricultural policy and planning, food policy, nutrition policy, and outcomes of nutritional status. Students explore definitions of "hunger” and “malnutrition." The planning and analytical process of defining nutritional problems at the village and household level are discussed, along with appropriate technologies and techniques to resolve food security problems. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Lockwood

HS 270f Business Law
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Provides a general introduction to U.S. legal concepts and issues with which contemporary managers should be acquainted. Managers must not only be aware of the legal requirements related to their particular function, but must also be cognizant of the broader ramifications of legal matters on the enterprise as a whole. This course will provide students with an understanding of legal issues from both of these perspectives guiding them with regard to appropriate legal treatment in a variety of settings. Further, discussions of ethical dilemmas that potentially present challenges to managers dealing with business and legal issues within organizations will be explored and discussed. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Rudin

HS 271a Perspectives in International Development
A foundation course that introduces students to sustainable development theory and practice. The course provides an overview of trends, measurements, consequences, and policy responses to poverty and inequality within the context of sustainable development. Topics include poverty, inequality, globalization, human rights, gender, the environment, and the role of institutions. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Assan

HS 271f Socio-Psychological Approaches to Local and International Conflict
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Presents the socio-psychological frameworks for understanding the development and dynamics of inter-societal and international conflicts, and their management and resolution. It will address such questions as: Are conflicts between peoples and nations inevitable? Why do they erupt, and at particular times? Why do they often take so long to resolve? Why are so many people willing to lose their lives in fighting? How do groups develop a hatred of other groups? How do you deal with ethnic, political or religious fundamentalism? What social psychological needs are important to address for peacebuilding and post conflict reconciliation to be successful? The course will also introduce students to basic socio-psychological concepts that are useful in understanding the causes of conflict and violence at local and international levels, and how to better manage them. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Fitzduff

HS 272a Responsible Leadership
Examines whether leadership is good news or bad news. It is about leading, but it might also be about misleading. It is more than just good intentions, charisma, a personal gift, or features of a person; it is about impact, serving justice, positive values and the community; it must be done right. When it is exercised properly, the good must ensue for most of all, while empowering the voiceless, the weak, the least privileged, the most at risk, the disenfranchised. That is why this course is not interested merely in a leadership that is just another word for power at any cost, just an instrument for any cause. All together, the class will be spotting responsible leadership, where the solutions of women and men of power respond to the problems of the people, to whom they are accountable for. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Lempereur

HS 272f Building Microfinance Institutions and Partnerships
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Leads students through the steps to build a large scale cost-effective microfinance program and examines design problems of existing programs, using the experience of the students and of programs the instructor has evaluated. Students examine how to build and staff microfinance institutions and explore strategies for partnerships with local NGOs and village-level organizations to expand outreach. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Ashe and Mr. Parmeshwar

HS 274a Directed Readings in Sustainable Development
Usually offered every year.
Staff

HS 274b Directed Readings in Sustainable Development
Usually offered every year.
Staff

HS 274f Directed Readings in Sustainable Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Usually offered every semester.
Staff

HS 276f World Health
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
A primer on major diseases and problems of health care in developing nations. Topics include descriptions of disease incidence and prevalence, including infectious, chronic, and mental disease; determinants of health, including culture and behavior; the roles of nutrition, education, and reproductive trends and poverty; demographic transitions, including aging and urbanization; the structure and financing of health systems; and the globalization of health. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Bhalotra

HS 277f The Future of Diversity Work
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Diversity and multiculturalism are challenges to global human relationships whether in conflict management, peacebuilding, or humanitarian development. Imbedded in each of these concepts are numerous misconceptions around issues of ethnicity, race, culture, religion, class, gender, and oppression. Through a combined approach including lectures, readings, films and discussions, this course will uncover many of the popular misconceptions about these concepts and factors, will offer innovative and effective approaches to understand and address them, and will help students develop scenarios for a future of constructive coexistence which goes beyond the popular misconceptions. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Johnson

HS 278f Monitoring and Evaluation
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Introduces students to the field of evaluation, including their purpose, design, methodologies for data collection and analysis, and utilization. The course also explores the organizational environment in which evaluations are carried out, frequent challenges and pitfalls in conducting evaluation, and some tricks of the trade drawing on written materials and experiences of the instructor and enrolled students as well. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Roper or Ms. Snell

HS 279a Planning and Implementation
Focuses on concepts and methods of planning and implementation to promote sustainable development. The project cycle and project development are used to give students experience in problem-solving, logic, and organizational skills applicable to all planning, implementation, and monitoring functions. Attention is given to the context in which the project cycle takes place, identifying local problems and applying holistic solutions. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Howard or Mr. Ellsworth

HS 279f The Politics of Fiscal Crisis and Social Policy
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Analyzes the role of government in the economy and the impact of public policy on the allocation and distribution of resources and development of social welfare in the United States. In this course, you will learn how to understand and predict the effects of public expenditures, taxes, and regulations. We will examine these issues at the federal, state, and local levels. The course will explore the political concerns around public finance decision-making and related issues of equality and social justice. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Kuttner

HS 280f Microenterprise: Development and Finance
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Covers a broad range of background and operational issues related to design, implementation, and evaluation of microfinance initiatives reflecting a range of methods and approaches. Students learn about microfinance models, principles of effective program design and management, and how to move a program from low to high performance. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Ashe and Mr. Parmeshwar

HS 281f International Advocacy in Action
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Introduces concepts and methods to strengthen program planning and influence public policy and looks at how policy is shaped and changed in the real world. Students examine the experience of noted NGOs, learn to conceptualize and plan advocacy campaigns, become familiar with the many tools available to the advocate, and discuss how to monitor government compliance with agreed-upon policy changes. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Arena-DeRosa

HS 282f Environmental Impact Assessment
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Provides students with a working knowledge of the purpose and process of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). EIA is examined as a planning tool that can anticipate negative environmental and social impacts; increasing benefits, social acceptance, and durability of development projects while reducing their cost to budgets, communities, and the environment. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Boyer or Mr. Olson

HS 283a Legitimizing (In)equality: Attitudes, Beliefs, and Social Policy
Examines attitudes and beliefs about poverty, wealth, mobility, and inequality and their relationship to institutional practices and social policy. We will explore the forces that shape U.S. beliefs, attitudes, and opinions, how these views are expressed in the public sphere and policy discourse, and the processes by which attitudes are measured and inform policy decisions. Reading broadly from the social science literature, we will explore the legitimizing functions of beliefs about inequality and work together to develop strategies for challenging hierarchy enhancing perceptions and relationships. Usually offered every year.
Staff

HS 283f Gender and Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines politics and policies of international development from a gender-sensitive perspective. Concepts of "development" and “gender” are framed within historical and political contexts. Students examine how development affects women and men differently according to class, ethnicity, geography, age, and seniority. Ways in which gender asymmetries have been addressed in development and approaches to mainstreaming gender are explored. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Espinosa or Ms. Ready

HS 284a Transitional Justice
Introduces the concept and practices of transitional justice. We review the various mechanisms of transitional justice, including: criminal prosecution; purges and lustrations; truth and reconciliation commissions; reparations and compensation schemes; revisions of national-historical narratives; official apologies; and, public commemoration. Our focus will be on understanding the nature of the political and moral dilemmas encountered by countries that consider and apply these mechanisms. We will consider broad theoretical questions as well as specific examples. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Hirsch

HS 284f Gender Analysis
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines recent concepts and methods of gender analysis as an integral factor in program planning across cultures. Students are introduced to gender analysis frameworks, examine tools like gender budgeting and auditing, and analyze case studies that take an integrated approach to gender analysis. Students also learn how to use these tools in different settings and to address various issues. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Ready or Ms. Espinosa

HS 285a Marketing
An overview of marketing with a focus on how to formulate marketing strategies and identify and evaluate strategy-based tactics in order to achieve organizational marketing goals. Topics include strategic market planning, market research and analysis; consumer behavior; market segmentation, targeting, and positioning; social marketing; and the marketing mix-product, price, distribution, promotion, and marketing communications. Usually offered every summer.
Ms. Goldstein

HS 286f Civil Society and Non-Governmental Organizations
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
The phenomenal growth in non-governmental organizations throughout the world in the past two decades has transformed the delivery of development assistance and relationships between the north and south. This course examines the nature of civil society, types of and relationships among NGOs, and NGO relationships with the state, multilateral and bilateral organizations, and community organizations.
Staff

HS 287f Land Poverty and Reform
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines the evolution of land reform theory and practice around the world. Land inequality and land poverty pose fundamental obstacles to rural development and development more broadly. Students explore problems of land inequality and land poverty, historical and current models of land reform, tools for evaluating different approaches in different contexts, and the need to integrate land policies into larger development visions. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Simon

HS 288f Shifting Development Paradigms
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Introduces students to the history and different paradigms that have dominated and challenged mainstream development institutions and interventions – including the sustainable development paradigm. Students critically review assumptions, implications, advantages and limitations of development approaches. Through this process, students begin to develop their own development theories based on informed review and critical understanding. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Espinosa

HS 289f Demographics of Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Looks at the interrelationship of demographic variables and development policies and outcomes. Starting with demographic variables and concepts related to birth, death, and migration, it moves on to examine how changes in population size, density, age structure, and other variables interact with poverty, economic growth, and the environment. Usually offered every year.
Staff

HS 290a Economic Analysis for Managers
Open to Tufts MD/MBA and MBS/MBA students only.
Introduces economic approaches to managerial and policy decision making. Covers supply and demand, market structures, pricing and market failure, as well as useful tools such as optimization and game theory. Concepts are reinforced with case analyses and examples from the health and human services sectors. Some calculus required.
Mr. Friedman

HS 291f Development in Conflict Situations
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Explores trends of humanitarian action in relation to conflict evolution and transformation, as well as the connections between the concepts of development and humanitarian activities. The course approach is multidisciplinary, using a mix of academic analysis and practical experience to reflect upon working in armed conflict, as well as on the wider context of international development systems. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Quintiliani

HS 292f Critical Thinking and Advanced Professional Writing
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Develops advanced critical thinking skills, models of logical argumentation and debate, reading comprehension and advanced writing skills geared for professionals and practitioners in foundations, NGOS, government sectors and civil society organizations. Although we will focus on needs of sustainable international development, professionals and practitioners from other fields are most welcome, namely public policy, social policy and coexistence and conflict. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Sampath

HS 293f Religion and Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Explores the world’s different faith traditions and how they define and treat the problem of poverty. The class takes a critical look at conditions by which religion provides a source of liberation from human suffering and strategies for sustainable development. Students also examine how power is transformed along gender, class, racial, ethnic, and national lines when religions confront one another. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Sampath

HS 295f Economics of Natural Resource Planning
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Brings students up to date with economic theories, findings, and methods related to management and conservation of natural resources in developing nations. It gives students a broad way of thinking about the topic that goes beyond use of natural resources and forces students to look at other sectors of the economy and highlight practical applications of economic theory to conservation. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Godoy

HS 297a Field Project
Prerequisite: Two semesters as master's student in coexistence and conflict or permission of program director.
Offers students an opportunity to apply the theories and key themes covered in the core courses in a real-life setting. Requires completion of at least three months of a paid or unpaid internship or field project approved and monitored by a faculty adviser. The project could involve a research or consulting assignment or a structured internship in the fields of coexistence and conflict. Offered every year.
Staff

HS 297f Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
A primer for non-specialists on Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and its capabilities as a tool for planning and monitoring. Students learn how to determine an organization’s GIS requirements, focus on those requirements during planning, and apply the requirements to assess the size and scope of the system needed. Includes a computer lab. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

HS 298a Independent Study
Staff

HS 298f Independent Study
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Staff

HS 299b Team Consulting Project
A capstone educational experience for students nearing the end of the MBA program. Working under the supervision of a faculty adviser, teams of three to five MBA and Heller/Hornstein students provide management consulting services to nonprofit, community-based health and human services agencies. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Bailis and Ms. Carlson

HS 299f NGOs: Strategic Planning
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Introduces concepts, techniques, and skills related to organizational strategy; and strategic action, management, and planning for civil society and non-governmental development organizations Concepts considered include elements of strategic planning; assessing environmental factors; clarifying organizational values, vision, mission, and goals; and developing programs and services to achieve organizational goals. Usually offered every year.
Staff

HS 300f Integrated Conservation and Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Focuses on how to reconcile priorities of biodiversity conservation with socioeconomic development. The course looks at a number of case studies to identify and examine recent field methods of community-based conservation, ecosystem-based management, and protected area alternatives to achieve conservation, sustainable use, and equity while advancing social, environmental, and economic justice. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Howard

HS 301f Sustainable International Development Advanced Study Seminar
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. Open to second-year SID students.
Supports development practitioners in becoming stronger critical thinkers and scholarly writers, develop reading comprehension, and build professional skills to turn researched results into narrative documents that disseminate or lead to concrete development action. Students enhance skills learned to meet rigorous standards of professional writing, particularly suited for scholarly articles and case studies about development policy and practice. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Sampath

HS 303a Historical and Contemporary Developments in Social Welfare
Examines the development of social welfare over time by reviewing policy arguments within a historical context and using an analytic framework centered on eligibility, benefits, administration, financing, and behavioral incentives to assess perennial issues in social welfare and analyze contemporary challenges. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Doonan

HS 304f Reproductive and Sexual Health and Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
This course examines how the relationship between reproductive & sexual health and development is made clear in the Millennium Development Goals. Students explore, from a gendered perspective, development approaches beginning with family planning and moving through the shift to reproductive rights; acquiring a critical perspective to conceptualize and evaluate development initiatives in the area of reproductive & sexual health. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Ready

HS 306f Survey Design and Data Analysis for Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Provides students with an introduction to survey design and applied principles of data analysis in development. Topics include research design (hypothesis formulation, model building), data collection (principles of survey design, definition and measurement of variables, cross-sectional and panel surveys, focus groups and pilot tests), and data analysis (statistical and social significance; univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analysis). Usually offered every year.
Mr. Godoy

HS 307f Human Development and Capabilities Approach in Practice
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Explores the theoretical and practical perspectives underpinning capabilities approach and the work of Amartya Sen. Students look at the way human capability functions as a force in political-economic systems and at the enhancement of individual, institutional, and communal capabilities as a force for sustainable development goals such as poverty alleviation, environmental protection, gender parity, and education. Not offered in 2014-2015.
Mr. Sampath

HS 309f International Law for Development Practitioners
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
An introduction to the basic principles of international law for non-lawyer professionals working in international development. Covers core terminology of international law that development practitioners are likely to encounter, explains how international agreements such as treaties are created and implemented, and examines how international disputes, on issues ranging from environmental laws to the use of force, are resolved. Also provides an overview, in an international law context, of the roles of international institutions such as the United Nations and the World Court and of private actors like corporations and NGOs. Usually offered every year.
Staff

HS 310f Introduction to Education and Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines how governments, NGOs, and other institutions can create and support educational systems that foster development, leadership, and opportunities. Students look at comparative research, teaching, and learning in varied national contexts, roles of parents and communities, and methods to measure the effectiveness of diverse approaches in enabling people to lift themselves out of poverty. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Burchfield

HS 312f National and International Perspectives on Youth Policy and Programs
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Young people (10-24 years of age) account for 29 percent of the population in low- and middle-income countries. Over 100 countries have a significant bulge in their youth populations and vulnerability in terms of literacy, employability, skill training, life skills, and more. Of special interest in this course are the subset of policies and programs that aim to connect young people to the economic and education mainstream. It is these programs that will be the special but not exclusive focus of this course. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Hahn

HS 313f Indigenous Peoples and Development: Challenges and Synergies
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Explores conflicts between development, conservation, and indigenous peoples and how this relation has evolved. Students look at fundamental dilemmas and potential synergies that exist between indigenous peoples and development agendas, how ethnic conflicts threaten sustainable development, structural and cultural roots of such conflicts, and the role of ethnic exclusion in maintaining and distributing poverty within countries. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Espinosa

HS 314f Applied Data Analysis for Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. May not be taken by students who took HS 314b.
Geared toward those students with little or no background in statistics but with a strong desire to learn the topic. Students focus on principles of applied multivariate regression analysis in development and econometric analysis of data. The course teaches students to use applied regression analysis, experimental research design, and STATA 10, a software to do applied statistical analysis. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Godoy

HS 315f Advanced Monitoring and Evaluation Issues in Practice
Prerequisite: HS 278f Monitoring & Development or permission of the instructor. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
In this course monitoring and evaluation are approached from a strategic perspective. Students focus on knowledge and field methods to co-strategize how best to institutionalize good M&E practices that make a real difference in the effectiveness of development outcomes. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Roper

HS 316b International Health Policy
Examines major current issues in health policy and global governance shaping our world in the 21st century. There is increasing recognition of the development threats from health problems – from emerging infectious diseases to the recognition that global climate change is contributing to new or re emerging health threats. The recent WHO Commission on Social Determinants for Health outlined an ambitious agenda for research on health determinants, systems, and financing and new global institutions are promoting greater evidence-based research for health policy making that incorporate a wider array of inputs and stakeholders. Usually offered every year.
Staff

HS 318f Practices and Economic Tools for Sustainable Forestry
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Sustainable management of forests for wood and other products is important to secure income and resources while simultaneously protecting biodiversity and watersheds, as well as helping mitigate and adapt to climate change. Students explore ecological concepts and logistics of forest management and also examine the theory and practice of cutting edge economic tools for forest conservation and carbon sequestration, such as payment for ecosystem services (PES) and REDD+. Usually offered ever year.
Mr. Ellsworth

HS 319f Ethics, Rights, and Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Explores philosophical and ethical foundations of human rights as related to development studies, policy, and practice. Students look at complex political, economic, and cultural conditions to apply rights to advance sustainable development. Contemporary debates on human rights as a tool to define and realize justice and alleviate human suffering - such as poverty, hunger, and other detriments to health and environment - are examined. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Sampath

HS 320f The American Gay Rights Movement: Social Justice and Social Policy
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
This course is about the last forty years (1969-2009) of social justice and social policy in the American Gay Rights Movement. It is about the development of social justice and social policy in America that is inclusive of sexual orientation and gender identity. And, it is about policy development, and human behavior, in America that reflects the full civil, political, legal and moral equality of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered people. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Curnan

HS 321f Implementing Policy and Practice Change in Health and Social Systems
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Begins with definitions of policy and how policy is made from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Examines several frameworks for analyzing policy implementation and for planning implementation strategies. Several sessions will focus on the management skills and tools useful to planning and managing the implementation of policy change. Students will have the opportunity to bring conceptual knowledge and skills together in analysis of several case studies. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Huff-Rousselle

HS 322b Sociological Inquiry
Introduces students to the basic research literature on social stratification, social mobility, and inequality. The theme of this seminar is an analysis of rising inequality worldwide, placing the United States in this context. An examination of the sources for this phenomenon includes globalization, economic restructuring, public policy, and social mobility. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Shapiro

HS 322f The Global Economy and National Democracy
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Takes stock of the several ways that globalization complicates political democracy and efforts to manage capitalism. These include all major policy areas where democratic states attempt to temper markets, including: taxation and regulation, labor market policy, trade, finance, economic development, energy and the environment, social provision and redistribution, as well as the impact of globalization on politics and political power. A particular emphasis will be on social policy and social justice. The course will explore these questions from the perspective of both wealthy nations and developing ones. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Kuttner

HS 323f Participatory Action Research
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Participatory Action Research (PAR) with its inherent emphasis on equalizing power relationships between the researcher and the researched emphasizes the importance of respecting the situated knowledge of research participants. It is large based in Paulo Freire's pedagogical framework for liberatory education which seeks to help marginalized peoples to empower themselves through research and knowledge production for the purposes of political action. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Brown

HS 324a Social Experimentation in Child, Youth and Family Policymaking
Builds the skills necessary to critically assess the policy content, design, results and recommendations of (quasi) experimental research that examines the effects of social policies aimed at improving the lives of vulnerable children, youth and families. The focus is on providing a graduate-level introduction to the use of social experimentation methods in policy research. We examine four substantive policy areas as case studies: (1) early childhood education; (2) home visitation; (3) income incentives and supplements; and (4) housing. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Acevedo-Garcia

HS 324f Globalization, Development and Governance
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Explores philosophical and policy debates concerning the benefits, costs, and different approaches to expanded global commerce and economic development both in economics and politics. Instruction and materials will place current debates about economic development and governance or globalization in a context that reflects both history and theory from the perspective of diverse nations, cultures and regions. Learning outcomes are an enhanced ability to assess arguments regarding development and globalization and to cogently analyze, speak, and write about them. Students are expected to actively participate in teaching and learning with written and verbal presentations. Usually offered ever year.
Mr. Kuttner

HS 325f The Right to Water
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Explores practical applications of the human right to clean drinking water and adequate sanitation from a science and policy perspective. It takes an interdisciplinary perspective to issues of water, focusing on geography, social arrangements, and government choices that impact access to water at the household level. Modes of decision-making with regard to water policy are examined from technical and rights perspectives. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Olson and Ms. Papa

HS 326f Introduction to Stata® Programming and Data Management
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Introduces students to basic programming in Stata and provides guidance on data management strategies. The course will cover creating simple datasets and accessing existing ones, modifying and managing data, and performing simple statistical analysis. Data management strategies will be woven into each lecture and will be emphasized throughout the course itself. This course is intended for students who have little to no experience using this statistical software program. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Torres and Ms. Acevedo

HS 327f Using Health Information for Health System Improvement
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
To achieve delivery of quality health services and subsequently sustainable health of the target populations, the World Health Organization (WHO) promotes strengthening the six major building blocks of the health system: (1) governance and policy; (2) service delivery; (3) human resources; (4) health commodities; (5) health financing; and (6) health information systems (HIS). HIS remains the backbone for providing information to track progress for improving the different health system components and monitor the achievement of the health related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). This course will follow the structure of the Health Metrics Network Framework to review and better understand the health information systems that guide decision-making, leading to better health. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Lippeveld

HS 328f Humanitarian Response Elements of the Future
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Explores trends, history, and influences on the humanitarian sector and looks for new ways forward, with particular emphasis on how the humanitarian system can change to better serve the most vulnerable and provide new means to save lives, reduce risk, and strengthen resilience. The course links community organization for disaster preparedness and resiliency building to government policies and the global system. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Delaney

HS 329f Epidemiology
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Introduces the basic concepts of epidemiology applied to public health problems. Emphasis is placed on the principles and methods of epidemiologic investigation, the use of classical statistical approaches to describe the health of populations, and the application of epidemiological approaches to policy evaluation and health services research. The key topics include the dynamics of disease; methods of measuring disease burden; and epidemiologic study designs; and criteria for evaluating causal associations between risk factors and disease outcomes. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Zeng

HS 330f International Health Economics
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. May not be taken for credit by students who took HS 239b in prior years.
Prepares students with graduate-level knowledge in theories and research methods in the area of international health economics. The course aims at providing a rigorous economic framework that addresses both positive and normative issues in the economics of health in developing countries. Examples used to illustrate the economic theories have a developing country focus. Topics covered include: relationship between health outcomes and macro-economic performance; micro-economics of health care and insurance markets including demand for health care services, insurance, supply of physician services and other medical service; normative analysis for health policy and projects including market failure and public intervention. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Razavi

HS 331f Health and Development Frameworks
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Provides an overview of the relationships between health policy, economic policy and development policy. There are different ideas about the kinds of economic environments and economic policies which most effectively support ecnomic development for low income countries and the need for and requirements for social policies to improve health. We will examine the main economic and development theories shaping global policies and also examine the international institutions and political dynamics in health policy making, from the formation of the UN ( and the emergence of the WHO) in 1946. Usually offered every year.
Staff

HS 332a Research Methods and Evaluation
Prepares students to (1) thoroughly understand the rigorous conduct of research methods of public policy, with a particular emphasis on program evaluation and to (2) be sophisticated consumers of empirical of public policy research. A variety of class formats will be used throughout the semester including lectures, discussions, and seminars, depending upon the topic and readings. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Warfield

HS 333f Global Health Sector Reform
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Improved health status at a population level is recognized as an economic, political, and social good for countries at all income levels. This seminar will provide an opportunity to learn about the history and evolving rationale behind health sector reform. It will identify methods and tools that are used to assess and evaluate health systems, including determining the causes of problems. It will provide students with the conceptual and technical tools to develop innovative solutions that can be implemented with an aim to improving health system performance and equity. Since global health sector reform entails consultation from experts, this module will also provide information about this process. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Bhalotra

HS 334a Child and Family Policy: U.S. and Cross-Cultural Perspectives
Draws on a number of social science disciplines and women's studies to explore the construction of public policies that shape the lives of children and families. It will focus on material from the United States and will use examples from other countries for comparative purposes. The course will explore some of the key components of family policy as they have developed in the U.S. and provide a critical examination of the ways in which "the state" may alternately facilitate, control and constrain women's choices about whether and when to have children, and the conditions surrounding the employment and care of children and other family members. It will further consider the current economic and political context and how families strategize to combine jobs and family care. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Warfield

HS 335f Perspectives on Youth Policy, Program Management, and System Design
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
This seminar is offered to both deepen student understanding of one of the great challenges facing our nation and many developing countries and to explore emerging and best practices related to policy, management and systems/program design to address those challenges and create sustainable conditions for preparing youth for college, work, and life. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Curnan

HS 336a Heller MPP Capstone Seminar
Students will demonstrate the ability to define and diagnose public policy situations, collect relevant information, perform logical analysis, develop alternative, and make compelling recommendations; and to organize and communicate information clearly to a variety of audiences through formats including verbal presentations, policy briefs, and statistical charts, graphs, and tables. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Brolin

HS 337f Advanced Planning and Implementation: Issues in the Field
Prerequisite: HS 279a. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Explores the context of development projects and challenges faced by project managers, executing agencies, donors, partners, stakeholders, and beneficiaries. Values and priorities --including sustainability, participation, project ownership, accountability, and legitimacy – are examined in light of changing dynamics of power, procedures, and relationships in project management. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Howard

HS 338a Sustainable International Development Advanced Study Seminar
Open only to SID Advanced Study Students.
Focuses on methods to help advanced study and specialization students conduct research, write evidence-based professional papers, clarify frameworks of analysis for development case studies, and refine their use of evidence and academic literature to build strong arguments. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Brooks

HS 340a Aging Policies and Programs: U.S. and Global Perspectives
Covers a wide range of social policy issues related to aging individuals and societies. It views social policy broadly to include public policies at the national, regional/state, and local levels; policies of private organizations; and informal policies of families, religions, and racial and ethnic groups. The course lays a base of the historical and ideological antecedents of current policies in aging and presents and critiques alternatives for the future. It also covers the process of policy formation, including how aging plays out in the political sphere. The readings and discussions provide a comparative analysis of aging policies in the United States, other industrial countries, and developing countries. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Leutz

HS 340f Advanced International Health Economics
Prerequisite: HS 330f. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Prepares students to apply the theories and research methods in health economics in order to analyze the challenging real world questions and to formulate health policies that would address the most pressing challenges.
As an example the course analyzes the trends of healthcare costs in industrialized nations and offers a set of theories and evidence on the root causes of the cost increase. It will also cover the interplay between insurance, technology, and demand for health care and hence the risk of similar cost inflation in developing countries. Based on the lessons learned from industrialized world a series of evidence based advices for formulation of cost containment policies will follow.
Major abnormalities of health care market are discussed in this course. They improve the knowledge of students about the prevalent market failures and how to prevent or mitigate them. Additionally it will enhance students’ knowledge in those areas that ordinary theories of microeconomics and health economics have not been able to provide convincing answers to real world phenomena. For example consumer theory of microeconomics fails to fully explain the prevalence of underutilization of preventive care when the care is fully subsidized. Students will learn how the modern theories of Behavioral Economics are applied in order to modify health seeking behavior of consumers. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Razavi

HS 341a Public Finance and Budgeting
Utilizes facts and analytical tools to effectively make decisions about public finance and budgeting as a policymaker, policy advocate, policy analyst, scholar, reporter, and/ or citizen. Upon completion of this course, students will have a broad knowledge of why and how governments shape the economy; the extent of their intervention; and how and why government funds are currently allocated among competing uses. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Tannenwald

HS 342b Policy, Advocacy and Community Organizations
Provides students with an overview of the processes by which individuals and groups operating at the national, state, and local levels in the United States can effectively shape social policy. It will focus on two complementary sets of issues: 1) How knowledge is used to promote social justice, the barriers that face those who seek to use knowledge to change policy, and the kinds of strategies that have been and are likely to be effective in overcoming these barriers in the future, and 2) The strategies that advocacy organizations utilize in promoting policy changes that benefit different segments of society, especially those with relatively little economic or political power. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Bailis

HS 343f Entrepreneurship Boot Camp
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. Open only to Tufts MD/MBA Students.
Enables students to master the fundamentals of entrepreneurship. It explores how entrepreneurship has become a driving force in the healthcare sector, provides tools for developing and evaluating new ventures, and explores the blurring line between for profit and non-profit social initiatives. The course is designed to provide an intellectual and practical framework for combined degree MD/MBA students interested in exercising their entrepreneurial energy to solve problems in healthcare and will explore the process of launching a new venture, particularly in the healthcare sector. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Chilingerian and Mr. Jabre

HS 344a Health Law and Ethics
Introduces MBA students in health administration and management, to the legal issues that health care professionals confront in managing a health care organization. Begins with patient care (liability) issues and thereafter provides an overview of other health care delivery issues such as the legal structure of corporations, healthcare finance and managed care, intellectual property and healthcare entitlement programs such as Medicare and Medicaid. Students become familiar with the basic legal principles governing how health care institutions are operated and how legal doctrine are formulated. The course also familiarizes students with the emerging ethical issues in healthcare management. Usually offered every summer.
Ms. Noble

HS 345f 3D Security: Diplomacy, Development and Defense
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Focuses on developing an understanding of, and response to, the security needs of a changing world order. We will examine recent efforts at coordination of diplomacy, development and defense (3Ds) as part of a new strategic framework for security sector reform. Particular attention will be given to the new paradigm of human security in which people, rather than states, become the primary beneficiaries. The scope of the course will include examination of the whole timeline from pre-war to post-war and include assessment of both government and civil society roles. We will examine the goals, strategies and tactics, as well as the challenges facing each of the Ds - within both developed and developing countries. Specific attention will be given to the challenge of integrating a holistic approach to security. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on the implications for work in the fields of coexistence and sustainable international development. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Steele

HS 347a Healthcare Technology and Information Systems
Discusses the role of science and technology in health care settings. Through case studies of technology companies (pharmaceutical, biotech, medical device, and information technology), the class examines how firms manage the creation, development, adoption, and spread of medical innovations in the context of a cost-constrained marketplace. The class uses current academic literature and newspaper articles to discuss how hospitals, insurers, and federal agencies can affect technological progress. Usually offered every summer.
Mr. Zinner

HS 348f Advanced Practical Communication for International Development
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
The purpose of this course is to do what many good journalists do: help practitioners learn to identify and report the facts, analyze critically, and communicate the story effectively; all within the context and goals of sustainable development, social transformation, and enhancement of equity. The course focuses on new methods of communicating ideas, interview and presentation skills, and traditional and emerging technologies. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Martin

HS 349f Introduction to Health Economics
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Uses examples to illustrate the economic theories that have a developing country focus. Topics covered should prepare students to take on subjects in their more advanced courses such as microeconomics of health care and insurance markets, demand for health care services, demand for insurance, supply of physician services and other medical service. The normative analysis for international health policy and projects includes various aspects of market failure and government intervention and market regulation. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Razavi

HS 352f Learning Across Borders: Aligning Policy and Practice with Development Goals and Values
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. Open to second-year MA SID students or with permission of the instructor.
An experimental, inter-university course involving graduate students from the University for Development Studies in Ghana and Beijing Normal University in China. Through weekly ‘live’ discussions via video conferencing, the course fosters dialogue across borders about challenges to implementing policies and programs that achieve social justice and development goals. Priority is given to second year MA/SID students. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Lakshmikanthan

HS 353a Managing the Triple Bottom Line
Explores a new kind of “bottom line” developing for corporations which includes social and environmental returns as well as financial returns. How can we measure “Return on Responsibility?” What are the implications for stockholders, employees and consumers when it comes to social and environmental accountability in the corporate world? How do business decisions get made when financial considerations are not the only decisions central to continued growth and success? Through case studies and meetings with institutional decision makers, this course explores shifting strategies and developing programs in the rapidly changing landscape of the Triple Bottom Line. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Appell

HS 354a The Political Economy of the American Welfare State
Addresses the political and fiscal foundations of social outlays intended to promote opportunity, security, and equality. We will examine the tax as well as the spending side of the ledger. The course will explore the current politics of austerity as a remedy for budget imbalance and slow growth, and the impact on social spending. These welfare state programs include: retirement security, health, income-support, labor-market regulation and subsidy, the use of tax credits and incentives, and various programs to help children and their parents. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Kuttner

HS 357f Health Law and Ethics I
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Introduces students to patient care and liability issues within the context of the U.S. health care delivery system. The course will cover legal and ethical aspects of: 1.) the provider/patient relationship and liability; 2.) health care quality, cost, and access; 3.) relationships between physicians and organizations; 4.) insurance, health care delivery systems, regulation, and the Affordable Care Act. Usually offered every summer.
Ms. Noble

HS 358f Health Law and Ethics II
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Introduces students to patient care and liability issues within the context of the U.S. health care delivery system. The course will cover legal and ethical aspects of: 1.) the provider/patient relationship and liability; 2.) health care quality, cost, and access; 3.) relationships between physicians and organizations; 4.) insurance, health care delivery systems, regulation, and the Affordable Care Act; 5) health care management. Usually offered every summer.
Ms. Noble

HS 365a Physicians Executive Field Experience
Open only to Tufts/Heller MD/MBA students.
An introduction to the real and complex problems of management and systems changes. Teams of three or four students work under the supervision of a faculty coordinator, physician executives, and other administrative personnel on a mutually agreed upon project designed to further the mission of the specific sponsoring health care industry organization within the time and resource constraints of the course. Usually offered every summer.
Mr. Nelson

HS 367a Working with National Data Sets to Inform Policy Analysis and Recommendations
Building on the courses in Applied Regression Analysis, Econometrics, Research Methods, and concentration course work, this full semester course provides students in-depth and hands on experience using large national data sets to conduct policy analyses. The course will guide students through the each step of the process of developing and carrying out a research project. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Meschede

HS 372b Economic Theory and Social Policy
Prerequisite: A recent course in microeconomics.
Applies economic analysis to problems of importance to social policy. The particular applications may vary from year to year and may include such topics as unemployment and inflation, Social Security, and the economics of race and gender. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Friedman

HS 401b Research Methods
Prerequisite: Open only to PhD students who have completion of, or current enrollment in, a graduate-level statistics course.
Provides a basic foundation in social science research methods. Focuses on skills needed to understand and initiate policy-oriented social research. Theoretical as well as practical issues involved in the interpretation and conduct of social research are considered. The perspective is multidisciplinary and emphasizes investigations of substantive health, education, and social welfare problems. Students have the opportunity to review and redesign research in their own area of interest. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Perloff and Mr. Tompkins

HS 403b Qualitative Research
Open to PhD students only.
Acquaints students with the theory and practice of qualitative research. Readings and discussions focus on epistemological and theoretical foundations of qualitative research, how to conduct qualitative research, and its relevance for social policy. Provides students with experience in direct observation, participant observation, and interviewing, as well as in writing field notes, memoing, and transcribing. Qualitative research from study design to analysis and presentation is approached as an iterative and interconnected process. Ethical issues are addressed, with emphasis on requirements for institutional review board applications for projects involving qualitative research methods. Students planning to go on to HS 411b typically prepare an IRB application for a project of their own design Usually offered every year.
Ms. Kammerer

HS 404b Applied Regression Analysis
An applied course in multiple regression analysis. Emphasis placed on the assumptions underlying the regression model, how to test for violations, and corrections that can be made when violations are found. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Fournier

HS 405a Applied Econometrics
Prerequisite: HS 404b.
Focuses on applications of regression analysis and extensions to areas where the standard assumptions do not hold. Introduces applications of logit and its extensions, probit, corrections for censoring and sample selection bias, and simultaneous equations. Each student designs and carries out a research project. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Zeng

HS 406f Hierarchical Linear Modeling
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Aims at providing the foundation for understanding and using a class of models falling under the umbrella of Multilevel Modeling. Analysis of multilevel data will benefit from models which explicitly take into account their more complex structure. Multilevel data is nested in the sense that the units of analysis are at some lowest level (level one, e.g. nurses or students), which lie within units from the next level (level two, e.g. wards or classrooms), which possibly lie within yet another level (level three, e.g. hospitals or schools) and so on. Many types of well-known data are multilevel, including complex survey data (for example, with PSUs and SSUs) and panel or time series cross sectional data (for example, with repeated measures nested within subject). Usually offered every year.
Mr. Fournier and Mr. Ritter

HS 407b Survey Research Methods
Prerequisite: HS 404b or equivalent.
Focuses on processes and techniques of survey research methods. Special attention is devoted to different modes of questionnaire design, development, and administration. Implementation issues considered include interviewing strategies and other data collection procedures, field supervision, code book development, and documentation data management. Data analysis issues include scale and index construction, reliability and validity assessments, and general analysis strategies. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Saxe

HS 409a Advanced Econometrics
Prerequisites: HS 404b and HS 405a.
Builds on the econometrics course to further develop students' skills in using multivariate statistical techniques, particularly for time-series and longitudinal data. Based on examples from human service and health care research. Students read/critique papers using each technique studied and learn to apply it in the computer lab. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Hodgkin

HS 410a Applied Research Seminar: Quantitative
Prerequisites: HS 404b and HS 405a. Open only to PhD students.
Designed to provide students with a series of formal exercises simulating the major steps in the dissertation process. Students gain competency in manipulating data from a large, complex data set; summarizing the methodology of findings from previous studies; and synthesizing and communicating the results of data analysis-placing study objectives and results in the context of prior research. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Ritter

HS 411b Applied Research Seminar: Qualitative
Prerequisite: HS 403b or permission of instructor. Open only to PhD students.
Provides students with experience conducting qualitative research, with an emphasis on data analysis and presentation. Readings and discussions address study design, sampling, credibility, triangulation, note-taking, data storage, computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software, ethical issues, and the analysis and writing process. A series of exercises focuses on data analysis, including identifying themes, coding, and memoing. Each student completes a qualitative project, using data s/he collects or has permission to use, and presents work in progress. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Kammerer

HS 412b Substance Use and Societal Consequences
Provides an overview of the use and abuse of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs. Examines the consequences of abuse from a societal perspective and reviews types of policy approaches to dealing with the problems associated with substance abuse. Specific topics include an overview of biological and clinical aspects, theories of addictive behavior, epidemiology, medical and economic consequences, prevention and education, and policy approaches including taxation and regulation. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Horgan

HS 414f Ethical Issues in Social Science Research
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Provides students an opportunity to explore the ethical dimensions of social science research. Ethical considerations are an integral part of social science research because such research often involves the use of human participants from vulnerable populations. Although social science researchers are expected to have an understanding of the ethical issues associated with their discipline, few have the opportunity to develop this knowledge. In this course students examine different topics associated with research design, data collection, data interpretation, and publication of study findings. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Reif

HS 422f Cost-Effectiveness
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Addresses the application of the technique of cost-effectiveness analysis to evaluate health and other types of programs in the United States and in developing countries. Presents the theoretical foundations and applications of cost-effectiveness analysis. Uses interactive discussions and computer exercises where students learn to perform cost-effectiveness analyses and apply the technique to a problem of their choice. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Shepard

HS 425f Case Study Methodologies
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Provides students with the preliminary tools to conduct and critique case studies. Begins with an examination of the appropriateness, strengths, and weaknesses of this method. Threats to internal and external validity are examined along with techniques to properly collect and document data from multiple sources. Techniques are reviewed for case selection, data analysis, and study presentation. The final class is spent critiquing actual case studies. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Prottas

HS 426f Advanced Techniques of Cost-Effectiveness and Cost-Benefit Analysis
Prerequisite: HS 422f or permission of the instructor. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Provides students with advanced techniques to conduct or critically review cost-effective studies, both in the United States and internationally. Students learn how to present a research question, design a study, obtain and analyze relevant date, and analyze results. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Shepard

HS 432f Survey Research Methods
Prerequisites: Open only to PhD students who have completed HS 401b and one semester of graduate-level statistics. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
The goal of this course is to provide doctoral students in social policy with an understanding of the basic principles of survey research design, their application, and analysis. Survey research is increasingly important as a tool in social policy analysis and the course prepares students to design/manage survey research and to use the results of others’ surveys. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Saxe

HS 435b Development Theory and Social Policy
Open to all Ph.D. students and to a small number of master’s students by permission of the instructor.
The course begins with basic theories, models, and evolving concepts for sustainable human development and examines the contexts in which development takes place. It also looks at some of the issues constraining sustainable human development. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Simon

HS 448f Introduction to SAS® Programming and Data Management
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
The purpose of this module is to introduce students to basic programming in SAS® and to provide guidance on data management strategies. The course will cover creating simple datasets and accessing existing ones, modifying and managing data, and performing simple statistical analysis in both software packages. Data management strategies will be woven into each lecture and will emphasized throughout the course itself. This course is intended for students who have no, or minimal, experience using these statistical software programs. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Acevedo and Ms. Torres

HS 472b Policy and Program Implementation
Provides students with frameworks of use for the study of the implementation of public policies. Considers the implementation process in the United States from a broad perspective, ranging from the context of legislation and the role of courts to how the role of street-level bureaucrats can be studied. Political science, organizational theory, and sociological perspectives are used to develop frameworks for understanding the process through which public policy is realized and how it has an impact on institutions and individuals. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Prottas

HS 492a PhD Internship
Provides an opportunity for PhD students to carry out a formal internship with a client organization under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Allows students to apply principles from the PhD curriculum for a client organization. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

HS 492f PhD Internship
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Provides an opportunity for PhD students to carry out a formal internship with a client organization under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Allows students to apply principles from the PhD curriculum for a client organization. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

HS 501a Innovations in Health Systems
Open to doctoral students throughout The Heller School, and to Master’s students with permission from the instructor.
Building on The Heller School’s initiatives in health systems policy; behavioral health; assets and inequalities; children, youth and families; and organizational management, this course offers students didactic and experiential opportunities in transformational change concepts and activities supporting the redesign of care delivery, organizational cultural change, and innovations in care through positive relationships. The framework for this course will include a range of scientific approaches to understanding health care organizations, and real-world applications of delivery system innovations. This course implements and integrates (1) the science of clinical care including evidence-based practice, (2) the science of measurement and improvement including quality and efficiency improvement through lean and other methodologies, (3) the science of management including leadership, and (4) the social and positive relational sciences including relational coordination, relational coproduction, collaborative practices, and team-based service delivery. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Gittell

HS 502a Child, Youth, and Family Poverty: Research and Policy
Examines major trends and policy approaches related to poverty among children, youth and families. The term will open with an overview of the significance of poverty, critically examining how poverty is measured, identifying major effects of economic hardship on children and families, and exploring anti-poverty policy's accessibility and impact. Against this background, we will study specific poverty topics, based on student's interests. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Dodson and Ms. Rosenfeld

HS 503f Global Mental Health: Policy, Programs and Country Plans
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Global mental health (GMH) is a dynamic, emerging discipline founded on a body of distinguished interdisciplinary research and practice. The need for policy and program practitioners that are well-trained in GMH (inclusive of alcohol and drug abuse, dementia, and certain congenital conditions) is urgent. This class will introduce the student to important definitions, concepts, research practices, and policy and programmatic responses related to addressing mental health disorders using examples and theory important in a global context. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Larson

HS 504f Introduction to the Theory and Application of Performance Measurement with Data Envelopment Analysis
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
How can policymakers, managers, and researchers evaluate the performance of organizations such as schools, government agencies, hospitals, social welfare institutions, and the like? The performance multi-output organizations are difficult to measure because the production functions are unknown or indeterminate. This course introduces students to Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) as a method of comparative performance measurement for policy, management, and organizational studies. DEA utilizes mathematical programming techniques that can handle thousands of decision making units and a large number of variables. The extant DEA literature reports thousands of applications of DEA to address these critical policy and research questions regarding the measurement and identification of the best results observed in practice. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Chilingerian

HS 505f Quality and Performance Measurement in Health Care
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
A conceptual and analytic framework of the field of quality of health care, which includes quality improvement and performance measurement; understanding of the contemporary research and policy initiatives that relate to quality of health care; and insights into the ways that quality relates to issues of provider payment, organization of health care facilities, and costs and access to health care. By the end of the module, students should have an understanding of the centrality of quality of care issues in contemporary health services research, health care policy, and management of health care organizations. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Garnick

HS 506f Advanced Topics in Quality and Performance Measurement in Health Care
Prerequisite: HS 505f. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Builds on HS 505f which is focused on the centrality of quality of care issues in contemporary health services research, health care policy, and management of healthcare organizations. The first module, offered as an elective every year, introduces basic concepts and offers an overview of the field. This module is offered as an elective every other year.
Ms. Garnick

HS 507f State Health Policy
Prerequisite: HS 513a or permission of instructor. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines the role of the states in the U.S. health care system. Provides an overview of state activities in health, including state responsibilities for managing health programs and institutions. Models to understand the nature of policy making and politics in states are presented and discussed. Examines major state health programs such as Medicaid. Outlines and explores the policy and legislative processes. States' efforts to reform their health care systems are discussed with special attention to implementation issues, barriers, limits of state action, and prospects for the future of state health reform. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Rosman

HS 511b Contemporary Issues in the Management of Child, Youth, and Family Services
Managing human service systems and programs to benefit children, youth, and families in America today means managing people in a time of fiscal constraint and dramatic social, economic, and political change, and, on the other hand, in a time of great organizational and civic innovation. Builds on the analytic tools students have begun to hone in the master's program and helps them learn how to apply these tools to effectively implement policies and programs in the not-for-profit sector. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Curnan

HS 513a Issues in National Health Policy
An overview of the U.S. health care system is followed by a critical analysis of the major issues and trends in the health care field. Concentrates on the activities of federal and state governments and the private sector. Also explores likely future issues affecting our health system. Of special concern is the issue of the large number of Americans with no or inadequate health insurance. A related problem is the rising cost of medical care, which results in increases in the number of uninsured. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Altman and Mr. Wallack

HS 515a Race/Ethnicity and Gender in Health and Human Services Research
Explores theoretical and empirical approaches to race/ethnicity and gender as factors in health and human services practices, programs, and policies in the United States. Begins by examining current data on racial/ethnic and gender differences in health, mental health, functional status, and lifestyle. Attention then turns to alternative accounts of the causes of these differences. Although primary focus is on patterns of race/ethnicity and gender differences in health outcomes and services that have received the most comprehensive attention, the course offers perspectives on research methods and analytic frameworks that can be applied to other issues. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Nsiah-Jefferson

HS 518a Management of Health Care Organizations
Introduces students to the concepts, theories, and practical problems of managing people in health care organizations. Case material is drawn from hospital, HMO, group practice, public health agency, and for-profit company settings. Students gain a better understanding of the range of strategic and operational problems faced by managers, some of the analytic tools to diagnose problems, and the role of leadership (and management) in improving performance. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Chilingerian

HS 519a Health Economics
Prerequisite: An introductory microeconomics course.
Economic models of demand, production, and markets for goods and services can be used to analyze the key resource allocation questions in health care. Applies economic models to questions of demand concerning the utilization and distribution of health care and to questions of supply, encompassing issues of cost, efficiency, and accessibility of care. The incentives and behavior of consumers and producers of health care are considered using these models. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Bishop

HS 520a Payment and Financing of Health Care
Examines current payment practices to health care providers, the problems with current methods, and possible modifications. Focuses only upon hospital care, physician services, and managed care. Covers the different ways that managed care organizations are structured. The payment and performance of managed care organizations and how performance is related to organizational strategies are included. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Wallack

HS 521a Political and Organizational Analysis
Focuses on refining the analytical skills useful to students for understanding the political and organizational factors influencing public policy. Most readings were selected because they represent an innovative, interesting, or challenging piece of analysis. The goal of each class is to identify and critique the core arguments of the work, the conceptual categories and assumptions on which the argument is based, and the data presented in its support. There is a focus on the differences in making arguments from the point of view of science, policy-making and political choices. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Prottas

HS 526a Organizational Theory and Behavior
An introduction to organizational theory and behavior from a policy and management perspective. Examines a number of major perspectives on the nature and process of organization. The course objectives are: to develop an awareness of what organizational theory is and why it is important in providing analytical lenses to see (or ignore) phenomena which might be overlooked; to review how some theorists have analyzed organizations; to develop a critical attitude toward the literature; and to encourage the development of an integrative (and creative) point of view. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Gittell and Mr. Chilingerian

HS 527a Race, Ethnicity and Gender in Public Policy
Students will examine framing in public policy in general, and its relationship to challenges faced by communities of color. Further, we will address the topics of race and gender in health and health care; education, welfare policy, immigration, housing, and other issues. Students will hone their skills in policy analysis, political advocacy, communication, coalition building and networking as they relate to the policy process. Class discussion, essays/case studies, and in-class assignments are used. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Nsiah-Jefferson

HS 529a Diversity, Inclusion and Equity in Social Policy
Examines how social scientists and policymakers define “vulnerable” or “disadvantaged” population groups, how these constructions can shift or change over time, and how policies and programs address inequalities and serve the needs of diverse groups. We explore the causes, correlates, and consequences of inequalities across the lifespan, and consider how race, ethnicity, gender, disability, social class, sexual orientation, age, and their intersections shape lived experiences and well-being. The potential of social movements, institutional restructuring, and policy initiatives to reduce inequalities and promote inclusion, equality, and social justice are analyzed. Usually offered every year.
Staff

HS 532b Social Policy Analysis: Technique and Application
Examines approaches to policy analysis and assesses strength and limitations of various methods. Exposes students to a range of methods and theoretical frameworks for exploring and understanding contemporary social problems and policy challenges. Begins with an overview of the stages of policy process, including policy formulation, rule making, and implementation. Policy analysis will be defined and a distinction made with policy research. The course also focuses on the criteria for evaluating policy options, including efficiency, equity, security, and liberty. Ethics and the role of values in shaping analysis will be explored. Actual policy analysis is evaluated in the areas of children and family policy, health, and welfare policy. Students have the opportunity to write and present a policy analysis critique. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Doonan

HS 534b Assets and Social Policy
The class conducts a thorough and rigorous examination of the central features, assumptions, and implications of asset-based policy, focusing on four central aspects of asset-based policy. Explores the analytic features of an asset perspective, and determines whether such policies could make a significant difference. Reviews evidence regarding the impact of asset-based policies from demonstration projects just now becoming available. Also examines in detail the implications for social policy. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Boguslaw

HS 572a Economics of Behavioral Health
Applies economic analysis to policy and research issues in the mental health sector, including cost-effectiveness, managed care, benefit design, and adverse selection. Studies the impact of different approaches to financing treatment and paying providers in the public and private sectors. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Hodgkin

HS 586a Issues in Substance Abuse Treatment
Provides an overview of issues related to clinical prevention and treatment services for alcohol, tobacco, and other drug abuse. Examines the organization, delivery, and financing of abuse services. Specific topics include the structure of the treatment system, access to service, the process of treatment, and the effectiveness, cost, cost-effectiveness, and quality of treatment. Examines the impact of managed care on the way services are organized and delivered and on clinical outcome. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Horgan

HS 602c Children, Youth, and Families Doctoral Seminar
Staff

HS 603c Health Policy Doctoral Seminar
Staff

HS 604c Assets and Inequalities Doctoral Seminar
Staff

HS 605c Behavioral Health Doctoral Seminar
Staff

HS 606c Global Health and Development Doctoral Seminar
Staff

HS 777a Social Welfare Tutorial
Staff

HS 777f Social Welfare Tutorial
Staff

HS 800g Proseminar
Priority given to Heller students; other students may enroll with permission of the instructor. Yields one-quarter course credit (one credit). May be repeated for credit, as the seminar topic varies.
Usually offered every fall.
Staff

HS 801g Proseminar
Open only to Heller students. Yields one-quarter course credit (one credit). May be repeated for credit, as the seminar topic varies.
Usually offered every spring.
Staff