Courses of Study

  • Master of Arts in International Economics and Finance
  • Master of Science in Finance
  • Master of Business Administration
  • Doctor of Philosophy

Sections

Brandeis International Business School

Last updated: August 17, 2018 at 2:56 p.m.

Established in 1994, Brandeis International Business School is a professional school dedicated to the study of the global economy through rigorous teaching and research in business, finance and economics.

The school prepares individuals from around the globe to become principled professionals in companies and public institutions worldwide, immersing them in international experiences and connecting them to best practices in business and policy. Its programs address the complex challenges decision-makers face in the global economy in varied business and policy-making environments.

The school's faculty consists of a body of highly renowned researchers and seasoned practitioners with extensive real-world experience. Their expertise ranges widely, embracing topics as diverse as municipal finance, global trade, cross-cultural fluency, monetary policy and central banking, strategic alliances, corporate governance, state-owned enterprises, entrepreneurial finance, initial public offerings, consumer judgment and decision making, leadership and identity in organizations, and the impacts of taxation, regulation and market structure on financial markets.

Centers and Initiatives

The school's centers and initiatives provide a springboard for the study of the global economy.

The Asia-Pacific Center for Economics and Business
The Asia-Pacific Center for Economics and Business conducts research, teaching and outreach on business and economic issues in the Asia Pacific region and on US-Asia Pacific relations. Its activities include faculty research projects, conferences, seminars, graduate and undergraduate courses, and exchange programs with Asia-Pacific universities.

The Asper Center for Global Entrepreneurship
The Asper Center for Global Entrepreneurship serves as Brandeis IBS’ platform to examine and understand the key trends affecting entrepreneurship across cultures and borders. It provides a diverse range of learning experiences through courses, seminars and conferences, internships, business plan competitions, field visits, and meetings with global entrepreneurs. The Asper Center was established in 2006 by Leonard J. Asper '86.

The Steven M. Bunson ’82 Finance and Society Initiative
The Steven M. Bunson ’82 Finance and Society Initiative serves as a cornerstone of the IBS offerings in socially responsible business. It supports courses and programs that are closely aligned with our commitment to the social and environmental needs of the broader society. Experiential learning opportunities include internships, field trips, speakers and student club activities.

Hassenfeld Family Innovation Center
The Hassenfeld Family Innovation Center, founded in 2014, is overseen by Brandeis University’s Provost who will facilitate collaboration between the Office of Technology Licensing (OTL) and Brandeis International Business School. The Center builds upon the university’s reputation as one of the nation’s leading research institutions by supporting faculty research while catalyzing innovation on campus. It provides a platform for increased corporate outreach to innovative firms, provides new educational opportunities for Brandeis students, and leverages the experience of industry professionals to ensure that the societal impact of the university’s groundbreaking research is maximized. The Hassenfeld Center will also enhance efforts to bring Brandeis’ research and technology advances to commercial partners in sectors such as life sciences, clean energy and information technology. It will serve as a platform to identify potential relationships with like-minded academic institutions and corporations around the globe.

India Initiative
The India Initiative at Brandeis IBS is focused on further strengthening our relationships with India, which has historically accounted for a large number of students and alumni. India is not only a huge, rising economy, but it is an especially important partner driving innovation in today’s global economy. The India Initiative focuses on developing strong linkages between Brandeis and India that offer great opportunities for fostering innovation and developing partnerships with both Universities and the Indian Corporate sector. The India Initiative is designed to establish us as a leader in facilitating and championing the triangulation of innovative opportunities between the U.S., India, and Israel.

Latin American Initiative
The Latin American Initiative is a collaborative effort seeking to increase the visibility of Brandeis IBS in Central and South America, through establishing strong business and governmental relationships, university partnerships, and outreach to local communities. The Initiative aims to have a long-term positive impact on student recruitment, alumni engagement, fundraising, and the creation of professional opportunities for students and graduates.

The Perlmutter Institute for Global Business Leadership
Established by Brandeis Trustee Louis '56 and Barbara Perlmutter in 2008, the Perlmutter Institute focuses on the intersection of business, the global economy, government, and civil society. Using a multi-disciplinary, holistic approach, the Institute prepares students for leadership in a globally interdependent world, promoting the value of balancing profit and the public good.

The Rosenberg Institute of Global Finance
The Rosenberg Institute of Global Finance seeks to analyze and anticipate major trends in global financial markets, institutions and regulations, and to develop the information and ideas required to solve emerging problems. The Institute, founded in 2002, is named for Barbara C. Rosenberg '54 and Richard M. Rosenberg.

The degree programs are the academic heart of the school and focus on business, economics, and finance.

Master of Arts in International Economics and Finance Program
The Lemberg Master of Arts in International Economics and Finance (MA) is a two-year (four academic-year semesters) professional degree that integrates high-level conceptual analysis in economics and finance, on the one hand, with practical applications and a global economic perspective, on the other. The degree offers a strong focus on the analysis of economic phenomena and related issues, including economic modeling, forecasting and evaluation. The program is STEM-designated and prepares students for careers in finance, economic policy, consulting, multinational corporations, and international organizations.

Master of Business Administration Program
The MBA at IBS is a two-year (four academic-year semesters) professional degree, and offers in-depth preparation in all business and management functions. MBA students can customize their program by completing one of five optional concentrations: Finance, Marketing, Data Analytics, Real Estate, and Strategy and Innovation. The Data Analytics concentration is STEM-designated).

Master of Science in Finance Program
The Master of Science in Finance (MSF) is a STEM-designated 16-month full-time program with a curriculum grounded in financial theory, quantitative problem solving and solid financial analytics. The program provides MSF students with these essential applied skills in addition to a required practicum which prepares them to compete in the financial job market.

Master of Science in Business Analytics
The Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) is a STEM designated 11-month or 16-month program that prepares students to gain a better understanding of statistical, programming, data visualization and econometric methods of analyzing data in order to make well-informed economic, financial and business decisions.

PhD Program
The PhD in International Economics and Finance, offered in collaboration with the university's economics department, provides advanced training in economic theory, research techniques, and creative problem-solving in an integrated, global economic framework. This STEM-designated program prepares students for research, teaching, and policy making careers in business, government, and international agencies.

Combined BA/MA Programs
Brandeis and Wellesley College undergraduate students may apply for admission to a special BA/MA track within the Lemberg MA Program in the spring of their third year. They begin taking program courses in their fourth year of undergraduate study and satisfy the master's degree requirements in one additional year of study at the graduate level after receiving their BA.

Accelerated MA Program
The Accelerated MA Program allows undergraduate students studying economics or business in the United States to earn the MA degree in one additional year after completing their BA or BS. The Accelerated MA Program curriculum combines graduate business coursework and practical learning in both international economics and finance, providing students expanded knowledge across both subjects and enabling them to succeed in the global job market across a wide range of opportunities. Accelerated MA students follow the same academic requirements as the two year MA program.

Accelerated MBA Program
For students with previous master’s study in business, management, economics or finance and at least one year of work experience, this program can boost or re-direct careers with added training and an MBA degree. Up to one semester’s worth of courses may be transferred to Brandeis from a previous accredited graduate business program completed in the last 7 years. The Accelerated MBA can be completed in three or four semesters. This program offers the same courses, concentrations and degree as the two-year MBA.


Brandeis International Business School Admission Requirements


The school seeks outstanding candidates from around the world and from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences. Factors critical in the evaluation of applicants to all Brandeis IBS degree programs include academic achievement, aptitude for graduate study, motivation, leadership, and professional/internship experience. Specific application requirements can be found below and more detailed information about these requirements and application deadlines is available on the Brandeis IBS website and by contacting the Office of Admissions.

Application Requirements (MA, MBA, MSF, MSBA)

  • Transcripts from all post-secondary institutions attended
  • GMAT or GRE score
  • Essay
  • Video Essay
  • Resume (minimum of two years of full-time work experience required for MBA)
  • Letters of Recommendation (2)
  • TOEFL, IELTS or PTE Academic Score*

Application Requirements (Accelerated MA)

  • Transcripts from all post-secondary institutions attended
  • Essay
  • Video Essay
  • Resume
  • Letters of Recommendation (2)
  • TOEFL, IELTS or PTE Academic Score*

The PhD program enrolls every other year and the next intake will be Fall 2020.

*Applicants must submit a TOEFL, IELTS or PTE Academic score unless they meet either of the following conditions:
1. Will complete or have completed a bachelor's degree (equivalent to at least three years of study by the program start) in one of the countries listed below.
Or
2. Have completed at least one year of graduate study at the time the application is submitted in one of the countries listed below.

Antigua and Barbuda
Federated States of Micronesia
Norway
Australia
Grenada
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Bahamas
Guyana
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Barbados
Ireland
Trinidad and Tobago
Belize
Jamaica
Turks and Caicos Islands
Canada
Liberia
United Kingdom
Cayman Islands
Malta
United States
Dominica
New Zealand
The Gambia

A TOEFL (internet-based) score of 100, TOEFL (paper-based) score of 600, IELTS score of 7.0 or PTE Academic score of 68 is required for admission.

TOEFL, IELTS and PTE scores are valid for up to two years.


Registration


Every resident, post-resident, and continuation student must register at the beginning of each term, whether attending regular courses of study, carrying on research or independent reading, writing a thesis or dissertation, or utilizing any academic service or facility of the university. All students on semester abroad must register and enroll in ECON 290a for that semester.

Students enrolled in full time degree programs are required to enroll in and maintain a minimum academic load of 12 credits per semester, except for their last semester (see Residency Requirements section for further details). Eighteen credits per semester is the maximum load per semester allowed unless additional credits are authorized by a Brandeis IBS program administrator.

Please refer to the Academic Calendar for specific deadlines for adding and dropping courses. In order to drop a class after the end of the registration period, a student must receive permission from the instructor and Program Advisor by completing the Add/Drop form available from the Brandeis IBS Office of Academic Affairs and Student Experience. The completed form with all necessary signatures must be returned to the Office of the University Registrar, Kutz 121.


Auditing Courses


The privilege of auditing courses without paying a fee is extended to all regularly enrolled full-time graduate students except part-time or special students. Part-time or special students may audit courses by paying for them at the same rate as those taken for credit. No courses may be audited without the permission of the instructor. Auditors may not take examinations or expect evaluation from the instructor. No credit is given for an audited course.


Credits Per Semester


Full-time MA students will be limited to enrolling in 18 credits per semester. MSF and MSBA students will be limited to 18 credits in their first two semesters and 10 credits in their third semester. MBA students will be limited to 20 credits per semester. Enrollment limits can only be overridden by explicit permission of the student’s Program Advisor.


Course Exemptions


Students may request an exemption from one or more required courses, but all such requests must be made during a student's first semester.

For many required courses, exemption requires passing a test in September. Applied International Macroeconomics (ECON 202a), International Trade Policy and Institutions (ECON 260a), Managerial Economics (ECON 207a), Investments (FIN 201a), and Corporate Finance (FIN 202a) can only be exempted via an exemption exam. Acclerated MBA students can petition to transfer equivalent coursework to meet these requirements.

For other courses students must demonstrate that comparable academic work was done prior to beginning a Brandeis IBS program. The work must be relevant and relate closely with the material covered in the Brandeis IBS class, as determined by the program directors. The request must be in writing on a specific form -- the Petition for Exemption from Degree Requirement form. These may be obtained from the Brandeis IBS website. A course syllabus and transcript must accompany the completed form.

Obtaining an exemption from a required course does not reduce the number of courses needed to complete the program; rather, exempted courses need to be replaced with electives.


Incompletes


A student who will not complete the research or written work for a course may file for an extension. The approval of the instructor and advisor are required.  Examples of conditions for which such an extension may be granted are serious illness, or family emergency.  The instructor specifies on the form the due date for all outstanding work, and submits a temporary EI (Excused Incomplete) grade for the student.  A final permanent grade must be submitted to the Office of the University Registrar by the incomplete grade deadline from the Brandeis Academic Calendar.  After the deadline, if the grade is still outstanding, the EI will be converted to a grade of I (Permanent Incomplete) or E (Fail) at the instructor’s discretion.
 
A student who cannot take a final examination as scheduled during Finals Week may, with the permission of the instructor, file for a make-up exam by contacting his or her Program Advisor. The exam may be taken at a time mutually agreeable to the student and instructor.  If a mutually agreeable arrangement cannot be identified, the make-up exam will be administered by the Office of the University Registrar according to university policy.  A make-up examination may not take place prior to the scheduled exam.
 
A temporary grade of EA (Excused Absence) will show on the student’s transcript until the final grade for the course has been determined.  The exam must be completed no later than is allowed by the university Registrar’s make-up exam schedule.  Failing to do so will result in a failing grade on the exam. 

Residence Requirements


Residence requirements vary by program and can be found in a later section of this Bulletin.

During all semesters other than the final semester of their program, students must take at least 12 credits and pay full tuition to satisfy the residency requirement. However, students must take a minimum of two credits and pay full tuition to satisfy the final semester residency requirement. These two credits cannot be internship credits. Only students who have front-loaded their coursework will be eligible for a reduced course load in the final semester. As such, these students have taken their allotted credits early and therefore must still pay full-semester tuition. By paying full tuition, any scholarship they receive will still be applied.

Accelerated MAs, Partner BA/MAs, Accelerated MBAs: If students do not complete their program in three semesters, under usual circumstances they must fulfill the residency requirement of the normal four-semester MA or MBA program. This will result in the student being charged a full semester tuition for their fourth semester. Scholarships will not be applied to the fourth semester.


Academic Standing Committee


The Academic Standing Committee (ASC) serves as the academic review board for Brandeis International Business School students. The committee evaluates student records at the end of each semester to determine academic standing. Academic standing refers to whether a student has a satisfactory or unsatisfactory academic record (see the Academic Status section below for further details).

The committee also hears all cases of required withdrawal from Brandeis International Business School.

The committee consists of the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Student Experience, who serves as chair, and the Senior Associate Dean and the program directors. Also in attendance as nonvoting members are the program advisors.

A student deemed to have an unsatisfactory record may petition the committee through his/her program adviser, who will present the student's written petition to the committee. The ASC may ask the program adviser for clarification or additional information as necessary. The ASC determines by majority vote whether to approve or deny the petition. The ASC may, at its discretion, defer its decision and require additional information in support of the petition. The decision that the ASC reaches is communicated to the student by the program adviser.

A student may appeal a decision by the ASC under certain circumstances. In cases of required withdrawal from the university, the student may appeal the committee's decision to the dean of Brandeis International Business School. The decision of the dean is final and no further appeals are possible.

In all other cases, students may request reconsideration by petition to the ASC only under the following circumstances: where the student has new evidence, not previously available, which could have materially affected the decision of the ASC; or evidence of procedural error.


Academic Standing


Students are in good academic standing when they earn a grade point average of at least 2.67 and have not received a non-credit bearing grade for the semester, and have maintained satisfactory progress toward their degree (see 3. below).

Probation is an official notation that a student is not in good academic standing. Students will be placed on probation under any one of the following circumstances:

  1. Their semester record contains one or more non-credit bearing grades. EA and EI grades do not result in probation.
  2. Their semester GPA falls below a 2.67.
  3. They are over 4 credits or more behind the natural progression toward the degree in the Accelerated MA program and 6 credits or more behind in all other academic programs.
  4. Earn less than 12 credits (full-time students) or 8 credits (first-year BA/MA students) in a semester.

Full-time students placed on probation due to 1-2 will normally be returned to good academic standing following a semester of satisfactory grades. Part-time students on probation due to 1-2 will be expected to maintain satisfactory grades for 12 credits to be returned to good academic standing.

Advising Alert is a category within good academic standing, but serves as an indicator to the student that they are not performing at the academic level expected by the university. Students who earn the maximum 8 credits of C+ coursework, or have a cumulative grade point average of 2.8 or below will also be placed on Advising Alert.

Degree eligibility normally requires a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.67.

The following chart defines academic standing:

Semester Record Cumulative GPA Less Than 2.67 Cumulative GPA 2.67 or Greater
All grades B- or better N/A Good Standing, unless cum. GPA is below 2.8, in which case Advising Alert
1 credit-bearing C+ Probation Good Standing, unless cum. GPA is below 2.8, in which case Advising Alert
Maximum 8 credits of C+s to count toward degree Probation Advising Alert
1 or more grades that do not receive credit Probation Probation

If a student receives more than one non-credit bearing grade in a single semester, earns a cumulative GPA of less than 2.3 in any one term or has had multiple semesters with unsatisfactory grades, the student may be required to withdraw from the business school because of a lack of academic progress. Satisfactory academic progress in a program also involves maintaining the professional and departmental standards expected in a particular discipline or program.

A student may be required to withdraw from the business school even if the student has not been on advising alert or probation in a prior semester. The business school may require a student to withdraw at any time, should the business school determine that the student's academic performance is so profoundly deficient as to suggest an inability to meet academic requirements. Brandeis University reserves the right to deny admission or permission to register or require the withdrawal of any student at any time for any reason it considers sufficient, including but not limited to character and personal conduct. Students are informed in writing of any change in academic status.

The academic standing of students who earn unsatisfactory grades will be reviewed at the end of each semester by the Academic Standing Committee according to the above stated definitions.

A student with an unsatisfactory record who either voluntarily withdraws from the business school or who is required to withdraw from the business school may petition to return to the university. The ASC will consider petitions for readmission. The student is expected to spend a minimum of one year away from the business school.

Primary considerations in making readmission decisions are evidence of sustained and productive activity during the period of absence from the campus, evidence of serious academic purpose and pertinent letters of recommendation attesting to the candidate's readiness to resume formal study.

Courses taken for academic credit while on voluntary or involuntary withdrawal from the business school are not eligible for transfer toward the Brandeis degree. Petitions for readmission for a fall semester must be received no later than May 1 and petitions for readmission for a spring semester must be received no later than Nov. 1.


Grading


Graduate students are graded on a scale from A+ to E. The lowest grade that will earn credit at IBS is a B–, with the exception that students in the MA, MSBA, MBA, MSF and Exchange Program are permitted a total of two courses with C+ (total of 8 credits) over the course of their program of study. Any C+ grade or lower beyond this exception will not earn credit. This policy does not apply to the PhD program, which requires a minimum of a B- in all courses to earn credit.


Grade Appeal


A student who has a question about his or her grade in courses is strongly encouraged to meet with the instructor and discuss how the instructor came to the student’s final grade. If the student continues to have concerns about his or her grade, the student may appeal in writing to the student’s Program Director. The Program Director will review the petition based on the faculty rationale for the grade, the course syllabus information on grading and the student petition. If a student is not satisfied with the result of the appeal, the student may petition the Dean for a final ruling.


Extended Master Students


In special situations a Master's student who has completed residence requirements may be permitted to remain at the university while completing degree requirements. Such an "extended Master student" should register for the appropriate courses required to complete his/her program. and will be permitted to utilize the full range of academic services and university facilities. Please refer to "Fees and Expenses" below for extended master tuition information.


Continuation Students


A doctoral student who has completed all degree requirements except the dissertation is eligible for continuation status. A student in this category enrolls on a full-time basis, and is eligible for university health insurance, borrowing privileges in the Library, a computer account, use of gym facilities, and purchase of a parking sticker. They are not normally eligible for fellowships or for leaves of absence, except for health reasons.

A student must be registered and enrolled in the term(s) in which the dissertation is defended.

Continuation students must enroll before the end of registration period each semester in CONT 500a (Graduate Research). For questions regarding these enrollments, please contact the Office of the University Registrar.


Special Students


Properly qualified applicants who wish to take courses without pursuing a degree may be admitted as Special Students. Special Students may enroll in courses on a space available basis, and are not eligible for university loans, scholarships, fellowships, or teaching or research assistantships. Should a Special Student wish to enroll in a degree program, the student needs to submit a full application by the application deadline for the term in which he/she wishes to enroll as a degree-seeking student. Special Students interested in enrolling in degree programs must have an undergraduate degree conferred from an accredited university prior to submitting an application to Brandeis IBS. Special Students are allowed to complete up to eight credits in non-degree status in the Master of Arts in International Economics and Finance (MA), Master of Business Administration (MBA) or Master of Science in Finance (MSF) program. Any courses completed as a Special Student will only apply to the degree program if the student has earned a minimum grade of “B” in the course.


Leave of Absence


A student who wishes to take a leave of absence from Brandeis International Business School (IBS) must meet with his/her Program Advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs and Student Experience to understand the full implications of his/her leave, develop a plan for reintegration into his/her academic program, and submit a Leave of Absence form to the Office of Academic Affairs and Student Experience. The Leave of Absence form must be submitted prior to the first day of the term for which the student wishes to begin his/her leave. If a student takes a leave of absence and returns to the program, the student may be subject to any curriculum changes that have taken place in the interim that apply to the corresponding graduating cohort.

Leaves of absence of up to one year will normally be granted to students in good academic standing. Returns from a leave will be subject to conditions established at the inception of the leave. If for any reason a student must extend a leave of absence, he or she must request such an extension in writing before the leave of absence expires. A student may only extend a leave for one additional year. Students who do not return after their approved leave period will be withdrawn from Brandeis IBS.

Students on a medical leave of absence who have course incompletes are not expected to complete assignments while away. As a result they are not bound by the incomplete deadlines listed on the Academic Calendar in the subsequent semester but rather the deadlines listed in the semester in which they return. Students requesting a medical leave of absence must indicate it as such on the Brandeis IBS change of status petition and must submit a Health Care Provider Report before they will be returned to active status.

Time spent on a leave of absence will be counted toward the maximum time permitted to complete the student’s degree requirements. A student who is receiving financial aid should contact the Office of Student Financial Services to discuss the potential impact of his/her leave on his/her financial aid package. A student who exercises a leave of absence while on Academic Probation must complete his/her probationary semester once he/she returns to the University.

A student who does not return for the term specified on his/her Leave of Absence form is considered to have withdrawn from the University. A student who absents himself/herself from the University without filing a Leave of Absence form will be withdrawn during the first term of the absence. If a student in this case wishes to return to his/her program, he/she must reapply to the program.


Withdrawal


A student who wishes to withdraw voluntarily from IBS during a semester must do so in writing to the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Student Experience or to the student's Program Advisor. Failure to notify in writing of a withdrawal may subject the student to loss of eligibility for refunds in accordance with the refund schedule outlined in the "Fees and Expenses" section. Permission to withdraw voluntarily will not be granted if the student has not discharged all financial obligations to the university or has not made financial arrangements satisfactory to the bursar. When a student withdraws after a certain date each semester, course enrollments are not expunged from his or her record; rather, a grade of W ("withdrawn") is entered for each course.

Students who are obliged to register and fail to do so by the appropriate deadline or who fail to pay their bill will be administratively withdrawn. They may be readmitted (see below) for study in a subsequent term, but not for the term in which they were withdrawn for failure to register. Belatedly fulfilling financial obligations will not negate the effects of administrative withdrawal. Additionally, a student may be administratively withdrawn due to unacceptable academic performance, violations of academic integrity, or violations of the University's Rights and Responsibilities.

A student who wishes to voluntarily withdraw from his/her Brandeis IBS program must meet with his/her Program Advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs and Student Experience to discuss the consequences of withdrawal upon the student’s academic future at Brandeis IBS and/or other universities, as well as submit a Withdrawal form to the Office of Academic Affairs and Student Experience. The Withdrawal form must be submitted prior to the last day of instruction in a term. Failure to notify in writing of a withdrawal may subject the student to loss of eligibility for refunds in accordance with the refund schedule outlined in the "Fees and Expenses" section. When a student withdraws after the open add/drop period, enrollments are not expunged from his/her record; rather, a grade of "W" ("dropped") is entered for each course.

Permission to withdraw voluntarily will not be granted if the student has not discharged all financial obligations to the University or has not made financial arrangements satisfactory to the Office of Student Financial Services. A student who is expected to register and fails to do so by the appropriate deadline or who fails to pay his/her bill by the appropriate deadline will be administratively withdrawn. If a student in this case wishes to return to his/her program, he/she must reapply to the program. They may be readmitted for a subsequent term, but not for the term in which he/she was withdrawn for failure to register. Belatedly fulfilling financial obligations will not negate the effects of administrative withdrawal.


Time Limit for Degree


The time limitation for completing all of the requirements for all Brandeis IBS master’s degree programs is five years. Students typically complete the PhD program within five years, but must complete the program in eight years. Time is counted from the beginning of a student’s program, regardless of any leave of absence taken.


Readmission


A Readmission applicant is any student previously enrolled in a Brandeis IBS graduate program based on the categories set forth below. Please note that Brandeis IBS graduate coursework will only apply toward the degree if the coursework was completed within five years of the term for which the student is applying for readmission.

Category A:
Students in good academic standing who, within the past five years, have withdrawn from the University, left the University without filing for a Leave of Absence, or whose Leave of Absence expired.

Applicant Requirements for Category A:

Application
Résumé
Reapplication Essay: Please describe all circumstances contributing to your previous withdrawal from the graduate program. This essay must state all reasons which, in the opinion of the applicant, should cause the Admissions Committee to conclude that you are now sufficiently able to complete the program.
Transcript(s): Readmission applicants need only supply transcripts of coursework they have completed outside of Brandeis IBS since leaving.

Category B:
Students who were previously enrolled in a graduate program and were unable to meet the required minimum degree completion of five years.

Applicant Requirements for Category B:

Application
Application fee of $100
Résumé
Letter of Recommendation (1)
Reapplication Essay: Please describe all circumstances contributing to your previous withdrawal from the graduate program. This essay must state all reasons which, in the opinion of the applicant, should cause the Admissions Committee to conclude that you are now sufficiently able to complete the program.
Transcript(s): Readmission applicants need only supply transcripts of coursework they have completed outside of Brandeis IBS since leaving.
GMAT or GRE score (GMAT or GRE is waived for applicants who left the program in good academic standing with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.67or higher).

Category C:
Students who were academically dismissed may be eligible to reapply after one full academic year.

Applicant Requirements for Category C:

Application
Application fee of $100
Résumé
Letter of Recommendation (1)
Reapplication Essay: Please describe all circumstances contributing to your previous withdrawal from the graduate program. This essay must state all reasons which, in the opinion of the applicant, should cause the Admissions Committee to conclude that you are now sufficiently able to complete the program.
Transcript(s): Readmission applicants need only supply transcripts of coursework they have completed outside of Brandeis IBS since leaving.
GMAT or GRE score


Brandeis Courses Outside of Brandeis International Business School


Students are only permitted to take courses for credit outside the business school (graduate or undergraduate) with permission from their program advisors, and must complete a petition to do so. Any non-IBS coursework taken for credit while enrolled in a degree program will be counted toward the student's degree GPA. Students may audit non-IBS courses without credit, with instructor permission.


Graduate Cross-Registration


A full-time graduate student at Brandeis may enroll in one graduate course each term at Boston College, Boston University, Tufts University (excluding the Fletcher School), Bentley University, or Babson College. Information on available courses for cross-registration is available at the graduate school office of each institution.

A student at Brandeis who wishes to enroll in a graduate course at one of the host institutions must obtain a cross-registration form from the Office of the University Registrar and secure the approval via signature of the Brandeis IBS academic advisor, the instructor of the course, and both the Brandeis and host registrar's office.

Due to differences in academic calendars among the colleges in the consortium, it is not advisable for degree candidates to enroll in a cross-registered course in their final semester.


Academic Honors


At graduation, Brandeis will grant the honor of "Graduating with Distinction" to Brandeis IBS MA, MBA, MSBA, and MSF graduates whose cumulative GPA is a 3.70 or higher.

At the end of two semesters, Brandeis will grant the honor of "First-Year Distinction" to Brandeis IBS MA and MBA students whose cumulative GPA is a 3.70 pr higher.

These honors will be recorded on the official Brandeis transcript of each recipient.


Tuition and Fees


Tuition
Tuition for MA, MBA, BA/MA and PhD full-time resident students for the 2018-2019 academic year is $52,750. The same tuition rate applies if studying abroad while participating in the Brandeis IBS exchange program. Tuition for first year MSF students is $59,728 for the academic year and summer and $13,187 for MSF students in their final fall semester. Full-time MSF students who take more than 44 credits will be charged the current FT per credit rate for additional credits. The 2018-2019 total program cost for Accelerated MA and Accelerated MBA students is $65,491. The 2018-2019 total program cost for MSBA students is $65,936. Tuition rates typically increase 3-4% each year.

Payment of tuition and other fees is due on August 3, 2018, for the fall semester and December 14, 2018, for the spring semester. A student who has not paid such fees by the first day of registration will be refused the privilege of registration. A late fee will be assessed to all student accounts with outstanding balances after the stated due date. The amount of the late fee will be $100, or 2 percent of the outstanding balance, whichever is greater.

Extended Master
If a 2-year MA, 2-year MBA, or full-time MSF student does not complete all degree requirements by the end of their residency, any courses he or she takes to complete his or her degree are then charged at the current per-credit tuition rate as established by the University.

Returned Check Fee: $30 per incident
A bank service fee will be charged to a student's account if a payment or a check negotiated through Brandeis is returned by the bank for any reason.

Transcript Fee
Current and former students should request official transcripts of their records from the Office of the University Registrar. At this time, students can order official paper transcripts free of charge. Brandeis University has partnered with the National Student Clearinghouse to allow current and former students to obtain official electronic transcripts to be sent to themselves or a third party in a secure manner. The fee for an electronic transcript is $2.25 - $4.00. This fee is payable directly to the National Student Clearinghouse. Official transcripts will be issued only to those students whose financial records with the university are in order.

Orientation Fee: $75
Assessed once to incoming full-time students.

Graduate Activity Fee: $88 per year
Assessed yearly to all full-time students.

Student Health Insurance Plan (single coverage): $3,477 per year 
All three-quarter or full-time students are required by state law to show certification of health insurance. Students without insurance of their own must purchase the Student Health Insurance Plan through the university. All international students at Brandeis University are automatically enrolled in the Student Health Insurance. The fee is payable prior to registration and no portion is refundable. Student insurance is optional for special students. Additional insurance options, including family coverage, are described in A Guide to University Health Services, which is available from Health Services. The Insurance Plan fee will include the ability to use student health services.

Parking Fee: $60 - $250 per year
Payable annually at fall registration for the privilege of parking an automobile on campus. Fee varies with assigned parking area.

Late Fees
A late fee of $100, or 2 percent of the outstanding balance, whichever is greater, is charged to any student’s account that is not paid by the due date.

Financial Regulations
A student who defaults in the payment of indebtedness to the university shall be subject to suspension, dismissal and refusal of a transfer of credits or issuance of an official transcript. Brandeis University may refer delinquent accounts to a collection agency. Students are responsible for paying the collection agency fee, which may be based on a percentage at a maximum of 40 percent of any delinquent account, together with all costs and expenses, including reasonable attorney’s fees, necessary for the collection of any delinquent account. Delinquent accounts may be reported to one or more of the national credit bureaus.

Such indebtedness includes, but is not limited to, delinquency of a borrower in repaying a loan administered by the student loan office and the inability of that office to collect such a loan because the borrower has discharged the indebtedness through bankruptcy proceedings. If the student is a degree, certificate, or diploma candidate, his or her name will be stricken from the rolls.

A student who has been suspended or dismissed for nonpayment of indebtedness to the university may not be reinstated until such indebtedness is paid in full.

Every student is required to complete a Financial Responsibility Agreement each semester. Any student who fails to complete this agreement prior to the start of classes will be denied the privileges of attending classes and using university facilities.

Final Doctoral Fee: $235
This fee covers all costs for the year in which the PhD degree will be conferred, including the costs for the full publishing services for the dissertation; publication of the abstract of the dissertation in Dissertation Abstracts; issuance of a Library of Congress number, appropriate library cards, and deposit of the dissertation in digital format at the Library of Congress; binding four copies of the dissertation—one hardbound for the author, and three xerographic softbound copies (for the author, IBS, and Library); and a microfiche for the Brandeis Library. The final doctoral fee covers the rental expenses for academic robes for graduation and the cost of the diploma.

Note: All candidates for the PhD degree must pay the $235 final doctoral fee at the Office of Student Financial Services before they file the application for their degree with the Office of the University Registrar.

Refunds


The only fee that may be refundable, in part, is the tuition fee. No refund of the tuition fee will be made because of illness, absence, or dismissal during the academic semester. A student who is withdrawing must notify Brandeis IBS in writing; refunds will be based on the date of notification and calculated in accordance with the following:

1. Tuition

Withdrawal

Before the opening day of instruction: 100 percent of the term's tuition.

On or before the second Friday following the opening day of instruction: 75 percent of the term's tuition.

On or before the fifth Friday following the opening day of instruction: 50 percent of the term's tuition.

After the fifth Friday following the opening day of instruction: no refund.

Requests for refunds should be addressed to the Office of Student Financial Services.

2. Scholarship

In the case of a scholarship student who withdraws, the student's account will be refunded consistent with the proportion of tuition paid. Of the total tuition paid, 100 percent will be reimbursed if the student leaves before the first day of instruction, 75 percent will be reimbursed if the student leaves on or before the second Friday; 50 percent on or before the fifth Friday, and no refund thereafter.

3. Stafford Loans

In compliance with federal law, special refund arrangements apply to students receiving aid under Title IV. Contact the Brandeis IBS financial aid officer for additional information.

4. Tuition Assistance Funds

In compliance with federal law, special refund arrangements apply to students receiving Department of Defense Tuition Assistance funds. Contact the Brandeis IBS financial aid officer for additional information.

5. Refund Policy for Dropped Courses

A student who drops courses on the per-course tuition-charge basis is allowed a refund following this schedule:

1. Full semester-long courses

Before the opening day of instruction through the last day of the registration period (see the Academic Calendar): 100 percent of the dropped course’s tuition fee.

On or before the fifth Friday following the opening day of instruction: 50 percent of the dropped course’s tuition fee.

After the fifth Friday following the opening day of instruction: no refund.

2. Module courses

On or before the 10th day of instruction for the module session: 100 percent of the dropped course's tuition fee. See the Academic Calendar page on the Registrar's site includes a link to the list of class meeting dates for a module session.

After the 10th day of instruction for the module session: no refund.


Housing


Nine-month living expenses in the Waltham area for a single individual on an economical budget are estimated to range from $9,000 to $14,490. Limited housing is available in the university's graduate residence halls and is usually reserved for exchange students during the fall semester. Costs for on-campus housing range from approximately $4,745 to $6,175 per semester for a single person. Graduate housing includes kitchen facilities, but students may also purchase university meal plans.


Financial Aid


To be considered for need-based financial aid through federal loan programs, U.S. residents and eligible Permanent Residents must submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. For more information about available loans, please contact Student Financial Services.


Scholarships


Committed to enrolling a highly qualified student body, the school awards competitive merit-based scholarships to qualified applicants. Domestic and international students are automatically considered for scholarships during the admissions process and are notified at the time of admission if they have received a scholarship. A complete list of available scholarships and criteria can be found here: www.brandeis.edu/global/admissions/financial-aid.html.

A scholarship recipient must maintain full-time enrollment and a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in order to retain his/her scholarship for the duration of the program. If a student withdraws from the program, fails to satisfactorily complete the required credits each semester or fails to maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0, his/her scholarship will be permanently forfeited.


Assistantships


A limited number of research and teaching assistantships are available for qualified students.


Loans


The Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan is available to graduate students as a financing option. Applicants must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid to be eligible for this loan. Graduate students may borrow up to a maximum of $20,500 a year, not to exceed the cost of attendance minus scholarship and any other aid received, with an aggregate maximum of $138,500. For the 18-19 academic year, the interest rate on the Stafford Loan will be a fixed rate of 6.595 percent and the origination fee will be 1.066 percent.

Repayment of a Stafford Loan begins six months after the borrower ceases to be enrolled at least half-time (six credits) in a degree program. The standard repayment period is 10 years, while interest is charged. (For more information about alternative repayment plans, please go to www.studentloans.gov.) Students are required to pay the interest during the in-school period, or have it deferred and capitalized.

The terms for the above loan programs are subject to federal legislation, regulations and other guidance, and may change. Additional current information is available from the Graduate School. Students wishing to apply for loans should contact IBS for application materials.

The Graduate PLUS Loan is a federal loan that allows graduate students to borrow up to their total cost of attendance minus any financial aid received. The student must pass an independent credit review. For the 18-19 academic year, the PLUS Loan will have an interest rate of 7.595 percent and an origination fee of 4.264 percent. Go to www.studentloans.gov to apply for this loan.

Borrowers of the Federal Direct Stafford Loan, and the Federal Direct Graduate PLUS Loan must complete the required promissory notes and entrance counseling online at the beginning of their entering semester upon receipt of correspondence from the Office of Student Financial Services. Anticipated credits on a student's account will be cancelled if all required steps are not completed.

A limited amount of University loans are also available to international students. This Graduate Brandeis Loan is a low-interest (5%) student loan. Loan capital is provided by the university. Repayment of both the interest and principal is deferred while the student is enrolled in school. Once the student ceases to be enrolled or graduates, a grace period of nine months will begin. Repayment must commence at the conclusion of the grace period. Students who are awarded this loan must obtain and complete the required promissory note, as well as any supplemental loan forms, at the beginning of each academic year. Loan funds will be tentatively credited to the billing statement pending the completion of the documents mentioned above. Anticipated credits on a student's account will be canceled if all the required forms are not complete.

Hamza Aburezak
Corporate finance. Investment management. Risk management. Hedge funds.

Brenda Anderson
Accounting and financial analysis.

Robert Angell
Accounting. Business planning. Entrepreneurship. Financial management. Operations. Strategic planning.

John Ballantine
Political economy. Mergers and acquisitions. Energy and climate.

Edward Bayone
Credit risk. Real estate. Country risk. Leveraged finance.

Daniel Bergstresser
Municipal finance. Corporate governance. Household financial behavior.

Elizabeth Brainerd
Labor economics. Economic demography. Health economics, health and fertility in post-socialist countries.

Linda Bui
Environmental economics. Industrial organization. Public economics.

Rob Carver
Business Analytics, Data Management, Applied Quantitative Methods, Statistics Education.

Stephen Cecchetti
Monetary policy. Financial stability policy. Central bank cooperation.

Sandra Cha
Leadership. Identity in organizations. Organizational behavior.

H. Michael Coiner
Economics of Higher Education, International Economics.

Judith Dean
International economics. Economic development. Econometrics.

Jane Ebert
Consumer judgment and decision-making. Temporal discounting. Health promotion.

Benjamin Gomes-Casseres
Strategy. Mergers and acquisitions. Alliance management. Innovation.

Kathryn Graddy
Applied microeconomics. Empirical industrial organization. Economics of the arts.

George Hall
Macroeconomics.

Alice Hsiaw
Behavioral Economics. Applied Microeconomic Theory.

Gary Jefferson
China. Technical progress. Open economy macroeconomics. Transition economics.

Blake LeBaron
International finance. Exchange rates. Artificial stock markets.

Ricardo Lopez
International Trade. Development Economics. Productivity Analysis. Latin America.

Michael McKay
Private equity. Public markets investing.

Nidhiya Menon
Development economics. Applied microeconomics.

Andrew Molinsky
Cross-cultural interaction. Organizational behavior.

Brad Morrison
System dynamics. Behavioral operations, healthcare operations, and operations management. Supply chain management. Medical decision making and patient safety.

Aldo Musacchio
Business Strategy in Emerging Markets. Technology Firms. Social Enterprises.

Ahmad Namini
Data Analytics. Quantitative Finance.

Debarshi Nandy
Corporate Finance. Financial Intermediation. Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Finance.

Carol Osler
Currency market microstructure. Exchange rates. Behavioral finance.

Peter Petri
International trade and investment. Asia-Pacific trade policy. Asian economic development.

Davide Pettenuzzo
Time-series econometrics. Bayesian econometrics. Forecasting. Financial markets.

Bhoomija Ranjan
New product entry. Consumer and retailer learning. Consumer search. Supply-side dynamics. Assortment and pricing decisions. Quantitative marketing and structural modeling.

Charles Reed
Entrepreneurship. General management. International marketing.

Scott Redenius
Economic History. The Economics of Financial Institutions.

Robert R. Reitano
Enterprise risk management. Financial derivatives pricing and hedging applications. Quantitative finance.

Anna Scherbina
Investment Management. Capital Markets. Behavioral Finance. Real Estate. Empirical Asset Pricing. Corporate Finance. Cybersecurity.

Raphael Schoenle
International Macroeconomics. Macro- and Monetary Economics. International Trade.

Benjamin Shiller
Empirical Industrial Organization. Economics of Information. Pricing.

Linda Stoller
Real estate. Finance. Financial accounting.

Detlev Suderow
Strategic HR Management. Leadership. Organization Behavior.

Yang Sun
Financial Institutions. Corporate Finance. Household Finance. Applied Microeconomics.

Hagit Weihs
Financial Accounting. Managerial Accounting. Financial Statement Analysis.

Qingxi Steve Xia
Investments, Portfolio Management. Fixed Income Securities. Asset allocation and Derivatives.

Grace Zimmerman
Marketing. Sales. Strategy. Entrepreneurship.

Other distinguished practitioners and educators serve as adjunct professors. An up-to-date list is available on the school's website, www.brandeis.edu/global.


Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts in International Economics and Finance (MAief)


Program of Study
Students must successfully complete an approved schedule of at least sixteen semester-length courses (or the equivalent), a total of 64 credits, during their four semesters of residency at Brandeis IBS. All students must take courses in Accounting, Investments, Corporate Finance, Managerial Economics, International Trade, International Macroeconomics and Applied Econometrics. Students take a capstone course for the degree that either relates to Economics or Finance or their concentration. Students may concentrate in one of five areas: Applied Economic Analysis, Data Analytics, Financial Economics, Marketing or Real Estate Finance. Otherwise students select from a list of electives in Finance, Economics, and Business. Four semester-length courses (or the equivalent) may be completed during a semester abroad. While enrolled in the program a student may petition to take courses in a field related to a student's professional interests (e.g.:math, computer science, public health ) that are deemed relevant to the MA degree. Courses taken without permission will not be counted toward the student’s 64-credit degree requirement. Students may exempt from all required courses except the Capstone and Applied Econometrics requirements.

Core Requirements (34 credits):

A. ECON 202a Applied International Macro (4 credits)

B. ECON 207a Managerial Economics (4 credits)

C. ECON 213a Applied Econometrics with R (4 credits)

D. FIN 201a Investments (4 credits)

E. FIN 202a Corporate Finance (4 credits)

F. FIN 212a Accounting and Financial Analysis or FIN 213a Intermediate Accounting (4 credits)

G. BUS 224g Launching Your Global Career (1 credit)

H. ECON 260a International Trade Policy and Institutions (4 credits) - Students who pursue a concentration in Data Analytics, Financial Economics, Marketing or Real Estate Finance may substitute a concentration elective course for ECON 260a, International Trade Policy.

J. A capstone course. Students who do not concentrate can choose between ECON 281f Challenges in the Global Economy: International Trade and Development (2 credits) or ECON 282f Challenges in the Global Economy: Macroeconomics Policy and Finance (2 credits). Concentration specific capstone courses are listed below.

Practicum Requirement (2 credits):
Any internship, field project or directed research (2 credits) The Capstone courses in Data Analytics, Marketing and Real Estate Finance satisfy this requirement

Residence Requirement
The program requires two years (four semesters) of consecutive full-time residence. One of these may be a semester spent at a foreign university associated with the program.

Concentration Requirements

Applied Economic Analysis

Group 1 Required Courses (4 credits): 
BUS 212a Big Data II (4 credits)
ECON 261a Empirical Analysis of Trade Policy (4 credits)
ECON/FIN 250a Forecasting in Finance and Economics (4 credits)

Group 2 Core Applied Economic Analysis (4 credits required): 
ECON 241a Antitrust and Regulation (4 credits)
ECON 270a Economic Development Strategies (4 credits)
FIN 247a Transfer Pricing Theory and Practice (4 credits)
or any course from groups 1 not taken to satisfy those requirements

Group 3 Applied Economic Electives (8 credits required): 
BUS 211f Big Data I (2 credits)
BUS 253a Marketing Research (4 credits)
BUS 260a Competition and Strategy (4 credits)
BUS 262a Alliance, Acquisition, and Divestment Strategy (4 credits)
BUS 263a Strategy and Innovation (4 credits)
BUS 272a Operations Management (4 credits)
BUS 279f Corporate Fraud: Detection and Prevention (2 credits)
BUS/FIN 241f Machine Learning and Data Analytics for Business and Finance (2 credits)
ECON 217f Game Theory and Business Strategy (2 credits)
ECON 235a Central Banking (4 credits)
ECON 252f Economy of China (2 credits)
ECON 253a Asia: Center of the World Economy (4 credits)
ECON/BUS 265a Business and Economic Strategies in Emerging Markets (4 credits)
ECON/FIN 209a Behavioral Economics and Finance (4 credits)
FIN 254a Modern Finance, Fintech and Beyond (4 credits)
or any course from groups 1 and 2 not taken to satisfy those requirements
*qualified students may take these courses with instructor permission

Data Analytics

Group 1 Required Courses (4 credits): 
BUS 211f Analyzing Big Data I (2 credits)
BUS 215f Python and Applications to Business Analytics (2 credits)

Group 2 Quantitative Courses (4 credits required): 
BUS 240f Information Visualization (2 credits)
BUS 256a Marketing Analytics (4 credits)
BUS 259f Digital Marketing (2 credits)
BUS 276a Business Dynamics (4 credits)
BUS/FIN 241f Machine Learning and Data Analysis for Business and Finance (2 credits)
ECON/FIN 250a Forecasting in Finance and Economics (4 credits)

Group 3 Electives (at least 10 credits required): 
BUS 212a Analyzing Big Data II (4 credits)
BUS 253a Marketing Research (4 credits)
BUS 274f Supply Chain Analytics (2 credits)
ECON 261a Empirical Analysis of Trade Policy (4 credits)
ECON 311a Advanced Econometrics (4 credits)
FIN 280a Financial Risk Management (4 credits)
FIN 285a Computer Simulation & Risk Analysis (4 credits)
FIN 288a Corporate Financial Engineering (4 credits)
or any course in group 2 not used to satisfy that requirement

Capstone (4 credits):
BUS 294a Data Analytics Field Project (4 credits) or BUS 286a Applications of System Dynamics (4 credits).

Financial Economics

Group 1 Required Course (4 credits): 
Fin 270a Options and Derivatives (4 credits)

Group 2 Core Courses (8 credits required): 
ECON 235a Central Banking (4 credits)
ECON/FIN 209a Behavioral Economics and Finance (4 credits)
ECON/FIN 250a Forecasting in Economics and Finance (4 credits)
FIN 217f Corporate Financial Modeling (2 credits)
FIN 218f Portfolio Financial Modeling (2 credits)
FIN 254a Modern Finance, Fintech and Beyond (4 credits)
FIN 261a Fixed Income Securities (4 credits)
FIN 271a Options and Derivatives II (4 credits)
FIN 279a Applied Risk Management (4 credits)

Group 3 Financial Electives (8 credits required): 
BUS/FIN 241f Machine Learning and Data Analytics for Business and Finance
ECON 260a International Trade Policy and Institutions (4 credits)
FIN 230a Trading and Exchanges (4 credits)
FIN 231f Private Equity (2 credits)
FIN 232a Mergers and Acquisitions (4 credits)
FIN 235a Investing in Energy (4 credits)
FIN 237f Security Analysis (2 credits)
FIN 242f Credit Risk Analysis (2 credits)
FIN 247a Transfer Pricing Theory and Practice (4 credits)
FIN 285a Computer Simulation and Risk Analysis (4 credits)
FIN 288a Corporate Financial Engineering (4 credits)
or any course in group 2 not used to satisfy that requirement

Capstone (at least 2 credits):
ECON 281f Challenges in the Global Economy: International Trade and Development (2 credits) or ECON 282f Challenges in the Global Economy: Macroeconomics Policy and Finance (2 credits).

Marketing

Group 1 Core Courses (8 credits): 
BUS 252a Marketing Management (4 credits)
BUS 253a Marketing Research (4 credits)

Group 2 Marketing Electives (8 credits required): 
BUS 254a Branding Strategy (4 credits)
BUS 255a Consumer Behavior (4 credits)
BUS 256a Marketing Analytics (4 credits)
BUS 257f Social Media & Analytics (2 credits)
BUS 258f Sales and Sales Management (2 credits)
BUS 259f Digital Marketing (2 credits)
BUS/FIN 241f Machine Learning and Data Analytics for Business and Finance

Group 3 Electives (4 credits required):
BUS 211f Big Data I (2 credits)
BUS 212a Big Data II (4 credits)
BUS 240f Information Visualization (2 credits)
BUS 260a Competition and Strategy (4 credits)
BUS 263a Strategy and Innovation (4 credits)
BUS/ECON 265a Business and Economics Strategies in Emerging Markets (4 credits)
or any course in group 2 not used to satisfy that requirement

Capstone: (4 credits):
BUS 292a Marketing Field Project (4 credits)
BUS 295a Projects (4 credits)

Real Estate Finance

Group 1 Required Courses (6 credits required): 
BUS 235f Real Estate Fundamentals (2 credits)
FIN 225f Real Estate Finance (2 credits)
FIN 242f Credit Risk Analysis I (2 credits)

Group 2 International Real Estate (2 credits required): 
BUS 236f International Real Estate in Emerging Markets (2 credits)
BUS 237f International Real Estate in Mature Markets (2 credits)

Group 3 Electives (10 credits required): 
BUS 211f Big Data I (2 credits)
BUS 212a Big Data II (4 credits)
BUS 252a Marketing Management (4 credits)
FIN 216f Financial Statement Analysis (2 credits)
FIN 261a Fixed Income Securities (4 credits)

Capstone: 
Bus 293a Real Estate Field Project (4 credits)


Combined BA/MA Program


IBS offers a BA/MA for qualified Brandeis or Wellesley College undergraduates who wish to earn the Master of Arts in International Economics and Finance (MAief) with one year of post-BA study.

BA/MA students begin taking IBS courses in their final year of undergraduate study and finish the master's degree with one additional year of study after receiving their BA. BA/MA students are considered undergraduates until they have successfully satisfied all of the requirements for the BA. Interested students apply in their junior year. Deadlines are listed on the IBS website. Applications may be made online through the IBS website.

Students must submit a completed application, official undergraduate transcripts, three letters of recommendation, essays, and a resume. An interview is required but the GRE or GMAT is not required. Admission is announced in mid-April for the fall semester. A student's preparation for the MA Program should include the following Brandeis undergraduate courses (or equivalent courses for Wellesley College students): Introduction to Economics (ECON 10a and 20a) and Statistics (ECON 83a). Students are recommended to take Macroeconomic Theory (Econ 82b) and Econometrics (Econ 184b).

Brandeis IBS Scholars

For those students admitted to the BA/MA at the time of their undergraduate admission to Brandeis, the following requirements must be met in order to join the program in their senior year:

  1. Minimum GPA of 3.0 at the end of the junior year.
  2. "B" grade or better in each of the following required courses, to be completed by the end of the junior year: Introduction to Microeconomics (Econ 10a), Introduction to Macroeconomics (Econ 20a), and Statistics for Economic Analysis (Econ 83a).
  3. Completion of undergraduate degree in four years.

Program of Study
Although some course substitutions are permitted, BA/MA students at Brandeis IBS have to meet the same requirements as two-year MA students and can refer to the MA course requirements for a general overview.

BA/MA students must take sixteen semester courses in their “field of study” (64 credits) and must get credit for all required courses. All IBS BUS, ECON and FIN courses (200 and 300 level) are relevant for credit towards this requirement, as are 100-level electives in ECON and BUS. Credit will be given for some or all of these courses taken prior to admission to the BA/MA program. Courses taken prior to admission to the BA/MA program will not reduce the sixty-four credits required during residency (see "Residency" below).

Some undergraduate ECON and BUS classes can fulfill MA program requirements. A detailed description of all acceptable substitutions for required courses can be found on the Brandeis IBS website and in the Brandeis IBS BA/MA Program Guide. Students should plan their four semesters of study upon admission to the program. While enrolled in the program a student petition to take courses in a field related to a student's professional interests (e.g.:math, computer science, public health ) that are deemed relevant to the MA degree. Courses taken without permission will not be counted toward the students 64-credit degree requirement.

BA/MA students are to gain graduate degree credit for a minimum of two Brandeis IBS courses (8 credits) in their final undergraduate year after being accepted into the program. Any shortfall could result in a termination of the student’s MA degree candidacy.

For information on specializations please see the Degree of Master of Arts section of the Bulletin.

Residence Requirement
The BA/MA program requires three semesters of residency at Brandeis from the semester students begin the program. The one to two semesters of a student’s undergraduate senior year followed by two semesters as a graduate student constitute the four semester residency requirement. One of these may be a semester spent at a foreign university associated with the program.* During these four semesters students need to complete sixteen courses (64 credits) even if they have taken elective or required courses before they begin the program. The number of credits transferred from a student's BA to the MA degree program will not exceed the number of total credits taken by the student in their senior year. If a student earned only 24 credits in their senior year, for example, s/he would need to complete 40 credits in their 5th and final year of the program. The residency requirement may not be waived or reduced.

*Note: Since BA/MA students are required to pass at least two Brandeis IBS courses in both the fall and spring of their final undergraduate year, study abroad is generally precluded until their second year of graduate work.


Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Finance (MSF)


Program of Study
Students must successfully complete an approved schedule of 22 credits in required core courses in Accounting, Investments, Advanced Corporate Finance, Fixed Income, Options and Derivatives, and Financial Modelling. Students must also complete 4 credits of practicum experience (Internship, Consulting Field Project or Directed Research). Students are then required to complete the remaining 18 of the total 44 credits within one of the 4 concentration areas or complete the MSF without a concentration. The concentration areas are structured towards career outcomes in the following 4 fields: Asset Management, Corporate Finance, Risk Management, and Valuation and Transfer Pricing.

Core Requirements (22 credits):

A. FIN 201a Investments (4 credits)

B. FIN 204a Advanced Corporate Finance Theory and Practice (4 credits)

C. FIN 212a Accounting and Financial Analysis or FIN 213a Intermediate Accounting (4 credits)

D. FIN 217f Corporate Financial Modeling (2 credits)

E. FIN 261a Fixed Income Securities (4 credits)

F. FIN 270a Options and Derivatives (4 credits)

Work Practicum Requirement (4 credits):
FIN 292a Internship (4 credits)
FIN 293a Field Project in Finance (4 credits)
FIN 294a Directed Research (4 credits)

Residence Requirement
The residency requirement is three academic semesters. Students are expected to complete their degree within sixteen months. In special situations, students may apply for a leave of absence for a one year period and multiples thereof.

Concentration Requirements
Students may choose to complete the MSF degree requirements within one of four concentrations, which are geared towards careers in the following four fields: Asset Management, Corporate Finance, Risk Management or Valuation and Transfer Pricing. Students may only declare one concentration.

Asset Management

Group 1 Required Courses (4 credits):
FIN 263a International Portfolio Management (4 credits)

Group 2 8 credits minimum required:
BUS 211f Analyzing Big Data I (2 credits)
FIN 218f Portfolio Financial Modeling (2 credits)
FIN 230a Trading and Exchanges (4 credits)
FIN 237f Security Analysis (2 credits)
FIN 242f Credit Risk Analysis (2 credits)
FIN 254a Modern Finance, Fintech and Beyond (4 credits)
FIN 271a Options and Derivatives II (4 credits)

Group 3 4 credits maximum:
BUS 212a Analyzing Big Data II (4 credits)
FIN 231f Private Equity (2 credits)
FIN 232a Mergers and Acquisitions (4 credits)
FIN 236f Technical Analysis (2 credits)
FIN 240a Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Finance (4 credits)
FIN 285a Computer Simulation and Risk (4 credits)
Or any course in group 2 not used to satisfy that requirement

Additional Finance or General Elective 2 credits maximum:
BUS 297a Internship (in Asset Management) (2 credits)
Or any FIN, BUS (except BUS 249f), or ECON course offered at IBS (including, but not limited to the courses listed above, if not used to fulfill another requirement)

Corporate Finance

Group 1 Required Courses (4 credits):
FIN 214a Managerial Accounting (4 credits)

Group 2 8 credits minimum required:
BUS 211f Analyzing Big Data I (2 credits)
ECON/FIN 250a Forecasting in Finance and Economics (4 credits)
FIN 216f Financial Statement Analysis (2 credits)
FIN 231f Private Equity (2 credits)
FIN 232a Mergers and Acquisitions (4 credits)
FIN 240a Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Finance (4 credits)
FIN 242f Credit Risk Analysis I (2 credits)
FIN 288a Corporate Financial Engineering (4 credits)

Group 3 6 credits maximum:
BUS 212a Analyzing Big Data II (4 credits)
BUS 235f Real Estate Fundamentals (2 credits)
BUS 260a Competition and Strategy (4 credits)
BUS 297a Internship (in Corporate Finance) (2 credits)
ECON 213a Applied Econometrics with R (4 credits)
FIN 225f Real Estate Finance (2 credits)
FIN 254a Modern Finance, Fintech and Beyond
Or any course in Group 2 not taken to satisfy that requirement

Risk Management

Group 1 Required Courses (8 credits):
FIN 285a Computer Simulation and Risk (4 credits)
FIN 279a Applied Risk Management (4 credits)

Group 2 (6 credits):
BUS 211f Analyzing Big Data I (2 credits)
BUS 212a Analyzing Big Data II (4 credits)
BUS 280f Operational Risk Management (2 credits)
BUS 297a Approved Internship in Risk Management (2 credits)
FIN 218f Portfolio Financial Modeling (2 credits)
FIN 242f Credit Risk Analysis I (2 credits)
FIN 254a Modern Finance, Fintech and Beyond (4 credits)
FIN 271a Options and Derivatives II (4 credits)
FIN 288a Corporate Financial Engineering (4 credits)

Group 4 (4 credits):
BUS 278f Corporate Governance (2 credits)
BUS 279f Corporate Fraud (2 credits)
FIN 280a Financial Risk Management (4 credits)

Transfer Pricing and Valuation

Group 1 Required Courses (8 credits):
FIN 214a Managerial Accounting (4 credits)
FIN 247a Transfer Pricing Theory and Practice (4 credits)

Group 2 6 credits minimum required:
BUS 211f Analyzing Big Data I (2 credits)
FIN 216f Financial Statement Analysis (2 credits)
FIN 218f Portfolio Financial Modeling (2 credits)
FIN 231f Private Equity (2 credits)
FIN 232a Mergers and Acquisitions (4 credits)
FIN 242f Credit Risk Analysis I (2 credits)
ECON 213a Applied Econometrics with R (4 credits)
ECON/FIN 250a Forecasting in Finance and Economics (4 credits)

Group 3 4 credits maximum:
BUS 212a Analyzing Big Data II (4 credits)
BUS 235f Real Estate Fundamentals (2 credits)
BUS 278f Corporate Governance (2 credits)
BUS 297a Approved Internship in Transfer Pricing (2 credits)
FIN 225f Real Estate Finance (2 credits)
FIN 254a Modern Finance, Fintech and Beyond (4 credits)
Or any course in Group 2 not taken to satisfy that requirement

Students who choose not to complete a concentration, may complete the MSF degree requirements by following the additional general finance requirements outlined below.

General Finance

Finance Electives 16 credits minimum required:
BUS 211f Analyzing Big Data I (2 credits)
BUS 235f Real Estate Fundamentals (2 credits)
FIN 214a Managerial Accounting (4 credits)
FIN 216f Financial Statement Analysis (2 credits)
FIN 230a Trading and Exchanges (4 credits)
FIN 232a Mergers and Acquisitions (4 credits)
FIN 236f Technical Analysis (2 credits)
FIN 237f Security Analysis (2 credits)
FIN 242f Credit Risk Analysis I (2 credits)
FIN 254a Modern Finance, Fintech and Beyond (4 credits)
FIN 263a International Portfolio Management (4 credits)
FIN 271a Options and Derivatives II (4 credits)
FIN 279a Applied Risk Management (4 credits)
FIN 280a Financial Risk Management (4 credits)
FIN 288a Corporate Financial Engineering (4 credits)
ECON 213a Applied Econometrics with R (4 credits)
ECON/FIN 250a Forecasting in Finance and Economics (4 credits)
FIN 213a Intermediate Financial Accounting (4 credits) if not used to fulfill the core requirement

Additional Finance or General Elective 2 credits maximum:
BUS 297a Internship (in any area of Finance) (2 credits)
Or any FIN, BUS, or ECON course offered at IBS except BUS 249f (including, but not limited to the courses listed above, if not used to fulfill another requirement)


Requirements for the Degree of Master of Business Administration (MBA)


Program of Study
There are two MBA Program options. The first is a 2 year MBA that requires a minimum of 2 years work experience. The second is an Accelerated MBA that is three semesters long and intended for students with previous study in Business, Management, Finance or Economics. It requires a minimum of 1 year of work experience. Up to one semester of coursework may be transferred to Brandeis from an accredited graduate business program completed within the last seven years. In the 2-year program, students must successfully complete a minimum of sixteen semester-length courses (64 credits) during their four terms of residency at Brandeis IBS. In both programs, at least eight and one-half semester-course credits must be taken within a required set of subjects (in the areas of business analytics, accounting, finance, marketing, operations, organizational behavior, management communication, and strategy) and the remaining courses must be selected from a list of approved electives. Four semester-length courses (or the equivalent) may be completed during an optional semester abroad.

Foundational Courses:
Prior to enrollment, students should have had a course in economics and one in statistics, which may be approved online courses.

Core Requirements (34 credits):

A. Accounting: FIN 212a Accounting and Financial Analysis (4 credits) or FIN 213a Intermediate Accounting (4 credits)

B. Finance: FIN 203a Financial Management (4 credits). May be substituted with FIN 201 and FIN 202a which is recommended for MBAs concentrating in Finance.

C. Economic Environment (4 credits):
BUS/ECON 265a Business and Economic Strategies in Emerging Markets (4 credits) or ECON 207a Managerial Economics (4 credits) or FIN 235a Investing in Energy (4 credits)

D. Organizational Behavior:
BUS 219f Fundamentals of Organizational Behavior (2 credits) plus one of the following: BUS 222f Global Dexterity (2 credits), BUS 226f Managing Global Human Capital (2 credits), BUS 227a Influence, Power and Identity (4 credits)

E. Management Communication: BUS 228f Management Communication (2 credits)

F. Marketing: BUS 252a Marketing Management (4 credits)

G. Strategy: BUS 260a Competition and Strategy (4 credits)

H. Operations: BUS 272a Operations Management (4 credits)

I. Business Analytics:
4 credits from the following courses: BUS 211f Analyzing Big Data I (2 credits), BUS 212a Analyzing Big Data II (4 credits), BUS 253a Marketing Research and Design (4 credits), ECON 213a Applied Econometrics with R (4 credits), FIN 217f Corporate Financial Modeling (2 credits), FIN 218f Portfolio Financial Modeling (2 credits)

Residence Requirement
Two years (four semesters) of full-time residence are required for the 2-year program. One semester may be spent at a foreign university associated with the program. For candidates in the Accelerated MBA degree program, three semesters in residence at Brandeis IBS as a graduate student are required.

Concentrations
Requirements to complete the concentrations can be found below.


Requirements for the Concentrations for the Master of Business Administration


Concentration Requirements
MBA students may complete one or two concentrations in the fields of Finance, Marketing, Data Analytics, Strategy and Innovation and Real Estate. Each concentration requires some credits in foundational courses and some in electives. Courses may be double-counted between concentrations.

MBA Concentration in Finance

22 credits are required beyond the finance course taken in the MBA core. These credits may also be counted towards fulfillment of other concentrations or of the MBA Core requirements. Excess credits in Foundation courses are counted towards the Electives requirement.

Foundation 6 credits required:
FIN 201a Investments (4 credits)
FIN 217f Corporate Financial Modeling (2 credits)

Elective Courses 16 credits required:
BUS 262a Alliance, Acquisition and Divestment Strategies (4 credits)
BUS 278f Corporate Governance (2 credits)
BUS 279f Corporate Fraud: Detection and Prevention (2 credits)
BUS 295a Field Projects (4 credits)
BUS 297c Leadership Internships in Social Impact Organizations (4 credits)
FIN 213a Intermediate Financial Accounting (4 credits)
FIN 214a Managerial Accounting (4 credits)
FIN 216f Financial Statement Analysis (2 credits)
FIN 218f Portfolio Financial Modeling (2 credits)
FIN 231f Private Equity (2 credits)
FIN 237f Security Analysis (2 credits)
FIN 241f Financial Planning and Control (2 credits)
FIN 232a Mergers & Acquisitions (4 credits)
FIN 240a Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Finance (4 credits)
FIN 242f Credit Risk Analysis (2 credits)
FIN 244f Credit Risk Analysis II (2 credits)
FIN 248f Advanced Corporate Finance (2 credits)
FIN 252f Banking, Central Banking & International Financial Systems (2 credits)
FIN 254a Modern Finance, Fintech and Beyond (4 credits)
FIN 261a Fixed Income Securities (4 credits)
FIN 263a International Portfolio Management (4 credits)
FIN 270a Options & Derivatives (4 credits)
FIN 279a Applied Risk Management (4 credits)
FIN 293a Field Project in Finance (4 credits)
FIN 280a Financial Risk Management (4 credits)
FIN 285a Computer Simulations and Risk Assessment (4 credits)
FIN 288a Corporate Financial Engineering (4 credits)

BUS 295a and FIN 293a are Field Project courses – only one can be counted towards this concentration. BUS 297c is a one year Internship experience and can only be counted once towards this concentration.

FIN 201a is a prerequisite for FIN 261a, FIN 263a, FIN 270a, and FIN 280a.

MBA Concentration in Marketing

20 credits are required. These credits may also be counted towards fulfillment of other concentrations or of the MBA Core requirements. Excess credits in Foundation courses are counted towards the Electives requirement.

Foundation 4 credits required:
BUS 253a Marketing Research (4 credits)

Elective Courses 16 credits required:
BUS 211f Analyzing Big Data I (2 credits)
BUS 212a Analyzing Big Data II (4 credits)
BUS 254a Branding Strategy (4 credits)
BUS 255a Consumer Behavior (4 credits)
BUS 256a Marketing Analytics (4 credits)
BUS 257f Social Media and Advertising (2 credits)
BUS 258f Sales and Sales Management (2 credits)
BUS 259f Digital Marketing (2 credits)
BUS 292a Marketing Field Project (4 credits)
BUS 295c Field Projects: Social Innovation Impact (4 credits)
BUS 297c Leadership Internships n Social Impact Organizations (4 credits)

BUS 292a and BUS 295c are Field Project courses – only one can be counted toward this concentration. BUS 297c is a one year Internship experience and can only be counted once towards this concentration.

MBA Concentration in Data Analytics

20 credits are required. These credits may also be counted towards fulfillment of other concentrations or of the MBA Core requirements. Excess credits in Foundation courses are counted towards the Electives requirement.

Foundation 8 credits required:
BUS 211f Analyzing Big Data I (2 credits)
BUS 212a Analyzing Big Data II (4 credits)
BUS 240f Information Visualization (2 credits)

Elective Courses 12 credits required:
BUS 215f Python and Applications to Business Analytics (2 credits)
BUS 253a Marketing Research (4 credits)
BUS 256a Marketing Analytics (4 credits)
BUS 274a Supply Chain Analytics (4 credits)
BUS 276a Business Dynamics (4 credits)
BUS 286a Applications of System Dynamics (4 credits)
BUS 297c Leadership Internships in Social Impact Organizations (4 credits)
BUS 294a Data Analytics Field Project (4 credits)
BUS 295a Field Projects (4 credits)
ECON 213a Applied Econometrics with R (4 credits)
BUS/FIN 241f Machine Learning and Data Analysis for Business & Finance (2 credits)
FIN 217f Corporate Financial Modeling (2 credits)
FIN 218f Portfolio Financial Modeling (2 credits)
ECON/FIN 250a Forecasting in Finance and Economics (4 credits)
FIN 280a Financial Risk Management (4 credits)
FIN 285a Computer Simulation & Risk Analysis (4 credits)
FIN 288a Corporate Financial Engineering (4 credits)

BUS 294a and BUS 295a are Field Projects - only one can be counted toward this concentration. BUS 297c is a one year Internship experience and can only be counted once towards this concentration.

FIN 201a is a prerequisite for FIN 218f, FIN 280a, and FIN 285a.

MBA Concentration in Real Estate

20 credits are required. These credits may also be counted towards fulfillment of other concentrations or of the MBA Core requirements. Excess credits in Foundation courses are counted towards the Electives requirement.

Foundation 10 credits required:
BUS 235f Real Estate Fundamentals (2 credits)
FIN 225f Real Estate Finance (2 credits)
FIN 242f Credit Risk Analysis I (2 credits)
BUS 293a Real Estate Field Project (4 credits)
BUS 295a Field Projects (4 credits)
BUS 297c Leadership Internships in Social Impact Organizations (4 credits)

Elective and Allied Courses 10 credits required:
BUS 211f Analyzing Big Data I (2 credits)
BUS 212a Analyzing Big Data II (4 credits)
BUS 236f International Real Estate: The Emerging Markets (2 credits)
BUS 237f International Real Estate: The Mature Markets (2 credits)
BUS 253a Marketing Research (4 credits)
FIN 226f Real Estate Capital Markets (2 credits)
FIN 261a Fixed Income Securities (4 credits)

BUS 293a and BUS 295a are Field Projects - only one can be counted toward this Concentration. BUS 297c is a one year Internship experience and can only be counted once towards this concentration.

MBA Concentration in Strategy and Innovation

20 credits are required beyond the strategy course taken in the MBA core. These credits may also be counted towards fulfillment of other concentrations or of the MBA Core requirements. Excess credits in Foundation courses are counted towards the Electives requirement.

Foundation in Strategy 4 credits required:
BUS 276a Business Dynamics: Managing in a Complex World (4 credits)
BUS/ECON 265a Business and Economic Strategies in Emerging Markets (4 credits)

Foundation in Innovation 4 credits required:
BUS 231a Entrepreneurial Finance and Business Plans (4 credits)
BUS 261a Managing Technology and Innovation (4 credits)
FIN 240a Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Finance (4 credits)

Elective Courses 12 credits required:
BUS 211f Analyzing Big Data I (2 credits)
BUS 212a Analyzing Big Data II (4 credits)
BUS 226f Managing Global Human Capital (2 credits)
BUS 230a Entrepreneurship (4 credits)
BUS 249f Business in Global Markets (2 credits)
BUS 254a Branding Strategy (2 credits)
BUS 262a Alliance, Acquisition and Divestment Strategy (4 credits)
BUS 269f Building Sustainable Business (2 credits)
BUS 278f Corporate Governance: From Colossal Failures to Best Practices (2 credits)
BUS 280f Operational Risk Management (2 credits)
BUS 286a Applications of Systems Dynamics (4 credits)
BUS 291g General Education Seminar (1 credit)
BUS 292a Marketing Field Project (4 credits)
BUS 295a Field Projects (4 credits)
BUS 297c Leadership Internships in Social Impact Organizations (4 credits)
ECON 207a Managerial Economics (4 credits)
ECON 241a Antitrust Economics: Regulating Competition (4 credits)
FIN 214a Managerial Accounting (4 credits)
FIN 231f Private Equity (2 credits)
FIN 232a Mergers & Acquisitions Analysis (4 credits)
FIN 235a Investing in Energy: Fossil Fuels to Cleaner Energy (4 credits)
FIN 247a Transfer Pricing Theory and Practice (4 credits)
HS 244a Responsible Negotiation (4 credits)
HS 257b Conflict Resolution by Negotiation (4 credits)
HS 270a Business Law and Ethics for Managers (4 credits)
HS 518a Management of Health Care Organizations (4 credits)
RPJM 113 Negotiating and Conflict Resolution (3 credits)

BUS 292a and BUS 295a are Field Projects - only one can be counted toward this Concentration. BUS 297c is a one year Internship experience and can only be counted once towards this concentration.


Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA)


Program of Study
The Master's in Business Analytics equips students to analyze data. This includes both theoretical and hands-on instruction in major elements of regression analysis, big data analytics, and related computational techniques, as well as the applications of these tools in financial and marketing analytics, as well as business dynamics. Students will learn data management and pre-processing, management-oriented visualization, data structures and analysis, selected machine learning methods, and predictive modeling. Through the use of widely adopted software tools, students will build models and execute analyses to address current needs of businesses. All students will take part in an experiential-learning field project, internship, or directed research. Program will include 40 credits.

Core Requirements 16 credits:
BUS 215f Python and Applications to Business Analytics (2 credits)
BUS 211f Analyzing Big Data I (2 credits)
BUS 212a Analyzing Big Data II (4 credits)
BUS 240f Information Visualization (2 credits)
BUS/FIN 241f Machine Learning and Data Analysis for Business and Finance (2 credits)
ECON 213a Applied Econometrics with R (4 credits)

Group 1 Electives 4 credits required:
BUS 256a Marketing Analytics (4 credits)
ECON/FIN 250a Forecasting in Finance and Economics (4 credits)
BUS 276a Business Dynamics (4 credits)

Group 2 Electives 8 credits required:
FIN 285a Computer Simulation and Risk Analysis (4 credits)
BUS 253a Marketing Research (4 credits)
BUS 257f Social Media and Advertising (2 credits)
BUS 259f Digital Marketing (2 credits)
BUS 272a Operations Management (4 credits)
ECON 311a Advanced Econometrics (4 credits)
BUS 297a Internship in Business Analytics (2 credits)
FIN 201a Investments (4 credits)
FIN 217f Corporate Financial Modeling (2 credits)
FIN 218f Portfolio Financial Modeling (2 credits)
BUS 274f Supply Chain Analytics (2 credits)
RPJM 101 Foundations of Project Management (3 credits)
May include any course from Group 1.

Group 3 Electives 8 credits required.

Capstone 4 credits required.

Residence Requirement
The residency requirement is three academic semesters (normally Fall-Spring-Fall), however students may accelerate the program by substituting a summer term for the final semester.


Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy


Program of Study
Requirements include successful completion of formal course work (14 course requirement), outstanding performance in both comprehensive and field examinations, completion of a third year paper, and completion of a thesis that represents substantial original research. Students are required to complete core courses (microeconomics, macroeconomics, and econometrics) and must also complete courses in applied methods and in one of the following fields:

1. International Economics

2. International Development

3. International Business

4. Finance

After core and field examination requirements are substantially completed, students are required to enroll in ECON 399a (Dissertation Workshop). This workshop provides opportunities for students to hear research presentations by faculty members and visitors, present work in progress, and define thesis objectives.

Residence Requirement
Three years of full-time residence are normally required. However, for most students it takes four or more years of full-time study to complete the degree.

Core and Field Examinations
Each candidate for the PhD must pass a written examination, offered every other year, covering the core required subjects in microeconomics and macroeconomics. Students must also pass written examinations in applied methods, which will include comprehensive testing on econometric methods as well as advanced topics. An exam is also required in a major field (see above) to demonstrate competence in a broad specialty. Field examinations are offered as required.

Third Year Paper
All students are required to complete a research paper during their third year. The paper must be an original and substantive piece of independent research (not co-authored).

Dissertation and Defense
All candidates for the PhD will submit a dissertation in a form approved by his or her dissertation director and by a committee appointed by the director of the PhD program. The student will defend the dissertation at a final oral examination.

Listed on the following pages are graduate courses of instruction for Brandeis IBS. Courses meet for three hours a week unless otherwise specified.

Most courses are available to all students qualified to take them. Access to some courses is governed by the signature of the instructor. Other courses impose a numerical limit to preserve environmental conditions suitable to the pedagogy the instructor employs; students increase their chances of gaining enrollment in such courses by participating in early registration.

Generally, a course is offered with the frequency indicated at the end of its description. The frequency may be designated as every semester, every year, every second year, every third year, or every fourth year.

Courses numbered 100-199 are for undergraduate and graduate students; courses numbered 200 and above are primarily for graduate students. Undergraduates may not enroll in courses numbered 200 or above without the written permission of the instructor.

Brandeis IBS degree programs are structured with the assumption that all students will be taking their required courses at their first opportunity and as outlined in the program guide. While some electives may be taken concurrently to these required courses, most electives assume that the student has already mastered the core content of their program. Prerequisites are noted in the following course descriptions.

Students wishing to exempt from a course requirement based on earlier studies are expected to submit a Petition for Exemption in their first semester. Students are not to assume that an exemption will be granted. 

Course abbreviations are as follows:

BUS Business
BUS/ECON Business and Economics
BUS/FIN Business and Finance
CONT Continuation
ECON Economics
ECON/FIN Economics and Finance
FIN Finance

Suffixes after course numbers have the following meanings:

A or B Semester course
F Half-semester course, half-course credit
G Quarter-course credit

A semester course carries one semester course credit (four semester-hour credits). Exceptions are noted under the individual course descriptions. Certain courses do not count for rate of work and do not carry course credit toward graduation. 

The university reserves the right to make any changes in the offerings without prior notice.

(200 and above) Primarily for Graduate Students

BUS 200a Work Practicum
Open only to IBS BA/MA IEF students who are entering their final year of graduate study.
Allows students to enroll on a full-time basis during the summer semester in conjunction with a required internship course. Students will be concurrently enrolled in an internship course. Usually offered every year.
Staff

BUS 211f Analyzing Big Data I
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Surveys quantitative techniques and computer tools in management information systems including database manipulation. Objective of the course is to help students acquire advanced computer skills through cases and hands-on applications. Usually offered every semester.
Bharantendra Rai and Bhoomija Ranjan

BUS 212a Analyzing Big Data II
Prerequisite: BUS 211f. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 212f in prior years.
Teaches theory and best practices of modern business analytics, with particular attention to business intelligence, predictive, and prescriptive modeling. We continue with data preparation and visualization introduced in BUS 211f, and provide hands-on experience with major methods of data mining and machine learning. In addition to working with RStudio and R packages, students will become experienced in methods of reproducible research, professional communication of analytic results and creation of data products. Significant use of case studies. Usually offered every year.
Robert Carver and Ahmad Namini

BUS 215f Python and Applications to Business Analytics
Designed to be relevant to any business student that wishes to build a skillset that can harness the power of the computer, computer science, and data analysis to various applications in business analytics. A set of these applications in business analytics that are relevant is data analysis (statistics, machine learning), data visualization (charting), algorithms (optimization, numerical methods, linear algebra), and forecasting (time series analytics, stochastic methods). Usually offered every semester.
Ahmad Namini

BUS 219f Fundamentals of Organizational Behavior
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 220a in prior years.
Covers the fundamentals of organizational behavior, including the topics of leadership, work motivation, organizational culture, organizational structure, group dynamics, perception, decision-making, and cross-cultural interaction. Final project includes analysis of cultural differences in organizational behavior concepts. Usually offered every year.
Andrew Molinsky

BUS 222f Global Dexterity
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
To be a global worker and a true "citizen of the world" today means you are able to adapt your behavior to conform to new cultural contexts without losing your authentic self in the process. Work on developing "global dexterity" skills to accomplish this. Not offered in 2018-2019.
Andrew Molinsky

BUS 224g Launching Your Global Career
Offered exclusively on a credit/no credit basis. Meets for one-quarter semester and yields quarter-course credit. Formerly offered as BUS 224f.
The goal of this course is to equip students with the career management skills essential to surviving and excelling in today's global labor market. Provides graduate students with a foundation and necessary tools for identifying target positions; conducting an effective and efficient job search; building career-planning and job-search skills that will be useful throughout their careers. Usually offered every year.
Marcia Katz

BUS 226f Managing Global Human Capital
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
An introduction to the strategic role international human resource management plays in creating competitive advantages for firms. Topics include global strategies for Employment, Compensation, Leadership Development, and Policies and Procedures. Students will learn the nuances of managing human capital in multinational firms. Usually offered every year.
Detlev Suderow

BUS 227a Influence, Power and Identity
Examines how many aspects of your career—landing a job, a promotion, or a new client—require you to influence other people and to affect how they think, feel and behave. Students will explore and apply the latest research on successful influence strategies. Usually offered every year.
Sandra Cha

BUS 228f Management Communication
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
This course helps students improve their business communication skills. It focuses on how to present ideas, facts, and analyses more clearly and concisely, so as to have impact on management decisions. Usually offered every year.
Staff

BUS 230a Entrepreneurship
Addresses the fundamentals of starting and growing a business, including entrepreneurial finance and financial management. Covers theory and practice and includes presentations by speakers engaged in entrepreneurship, underwriting, and venture capital. The major assignment is a team project to construct a business plan for a startup company using actual data. Usually offered every year.
Charles Reed

BUS 231a Entrepreneurial Finances and Business Plans
Open only to IBS students.
Introduces techniques for preparing business plans and explores the process of using a business plan to acquire funding. Requires students to prepare a business plan for a new venture and to present this plan in front of a critical audience. Usually offered every year.
Charles Reed

BUS 235f Real Estate Fundamentals
Prerequisite: FIN 212a (can be taken concurrently). Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Introduction to the analysis, financing, and management of income-producing real property. Explores how investors and developers identify projects, determine value, design marketing strategies, and obtain financing in the debt and equity markets. Usually offered every semester.
Shaw Lupton

BUS 236f International Real Estate: The Emerging Markets
Prerequisite: BUS 235f. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
The course looks at the analysis, financing, and management of income-producing real property in the Emerging Markets. Using case discussion, we will explore how developers and investors identify projects, determine value, design marketing strategies, and obtain financing in their various markets. Usually offered every second year.
Edward Bayone

BUS 237f International Real Estate: The Mature Markets
Prerequisite: BUS 235f. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Building on BUS 235f, this course looks at the analysis, financing, and management of income-producing real property in mature markets abroad. Using case discussion, it explores how developers and investors identify projects, determine value, design marketing strategies, and obtain financing in their debt and equity markets. Usually offered every second year.
Edward Bayone

BUS 239f Sustainable Real Estate: Profiting from Green Building
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Introduces principles and elements of sustainable development. Covers strategies and technologies that are being applied around the world to construct buildings and manage real estate development projects in ways that are simultaneously good for the financial bottom line and good for the environment. Not offered in 2018-2019.
Staff

BUS 240f Information Visualization
Prerequisite: BUS 211f, or the equivalent. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Modern computer graphics provide many ways to tame "big data," allowing users not only to view multidimensional information, but to interactively explore, combine, and interpret massive volumes of information using software tools including R, Microstrategy and Tableau. Usually offered every year.
Robert Carver

BUS 248b Business in Global Markets
Noncredit.
Usually offered every year.
Staff

BUS 249f Immersion Experience
Prerequisite: BUS 248b. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. Meets in a country with a dynamic business and economic environment. Consult the program administrator for details regarding special costs and meeting times.
Provides analysis of the host country's business, economy, markets, and institutions, in the broader context of its history, politics, culture, and society. Explores their relationship with broader global trends in business. In-country program consists of academic lectures, field trips to companies and other institutions, and group discussion. Preparatory lectures at Brandeis in advance of visit. Usually offered every year.
Staff

BUS 252a Marketing Management
An in-depth exploration and practical application of the basic marketing tools of product policy, pricing, promotion, distribution, sales management, customer segmentation, and retention in order to analyze marketing opportunities and develop marketing programs for a variety of management situations. Usually offered every year.
Grace Zimmerman

BUS 253a Marketing Research: Design and Analysis
A practical exploration of a broad sampling of market research techniques to compile, analyze, and apply consumer, product, and market intelligence to strategic and marketing decisions concerning market segmentation, targeting, positioning, product design, and demand forecast. Usually offered every year.
Jane Ebert

BUS 254a Branding Strategy
Prerequisite: BUS 252a.
Examines the value of building, sustaining, and communicating a company's brand and its value proposition through promotional activities and channels of distribution. A competitive, online simulation is used to enhance case studies. Usually offered every year.
Grace Zimmerman

BUS 255a Consumer Behavior
Focuses on fundamental theories and concepts in consumer psychology and exciting new findings to enhance students' understanding of how and why people choose, use and evaluate goods and services the way they do. This knowledge will come from lectures, readings and discussions in class, but also from hands-on experiential learning through involvement in a semester-long group project. Not offered in 2018-2019.
Jane Ebert

BUS 256a Marketing Analytics
Prerequisite: Statistics. Corequisite: BUS 211f.
Provides experience with applications of business analytics to marketing decisions. We begin each topic with a representative case study, practicing the skills of framing questions and decisions in ways that can be answered with available data. We study a group of widely-used statistical models to support and/or automate marketing decisions. Usually offered every year.
Bhoomija Ranjan

BUS 257f Social Media and Advertising
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Explores the activities a company undertakes to educate, engage and prompt to action its various target customer segments. Topics include advertising, promotions, event sponsorship, internet marketing, social media marketing, corporate blogs, word-of-mouth advertising, and marketing communications for social initiatives. Usually offered every year.
David Shaby

BUS 258f Sales and Sales Management
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Explores concepts and techniques for professional sales and sales management. Includes strategies for maximizing revenue and customer satisfaction while optimizing costs to sell, service and maintain customer relationships. Usually offered every year.
Grace Zimmerman

BUS 259f Digital Marketing
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Introduces students to important concepts and techniques of online marketing, such as search engine optimization (SEO), paid search marketing (search and display ads), web analytics, and monetization models (sales funnel and email campaigns). Students will have first-hand experience applying these concepts and techniques by building a website themselves to market a product or service. Usually offered every year.
David Shaby

BUS 260a Competition and Strategy
Introduces frameworks for analyzing industries and firm competitive advantage and reviews key concepts in business strategy. Uses case method to practice strategic thinking and team projects to practice business research. Core for MBA students and recommended for other business students. Usually offered every year.
Benjamin Gomes-Casseres

BUS 261a Managing Technology and Innovation
Focuses on skills and strategies needed to develop businesses based on new technologies. Through discussion of cases and concepts, the course explores innovation and technology management, strategy, marketing, financing, and performance of new ventures in entrepreneurial or existing firms. Usually offered every year.
Benjamin Gomes-Casseres

BUS 262a Alliance, Acquisition, and Divestment Strategy
Formerly offered as BUS 262f.
Business combinations are central to competitive strategy. Inter-firm alliances of various sorts (e.g., joint ventures) are particularly valuable in rapidly changing industries and in unfamiliar markets. Mergers and acquisitions can add value when scale and scope are keys to success. Surveys the strategic and organizational issues involved in business combinations. Discusses ideas from research, and applies them to managerial decisions using case studies and projects. Jointly taught by researcher and experienced consultant. Usually offered every year.
Benjamin Gomes-Casseres

BUS 263a Strategy and Innovation
Prerequisites: Knowledge of microeconomics and business studies, and ability to analyze financial statements. May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 260a in prior years.
Fast-moving and intensive study of the most important concepts and techniques in business strategy, with special emphasis on the process of innovation. The course is organized in three parts. First, we study fundamental frameworks in competitive strategy, and apply these to classic cases. Second, we examine how businesses create new value by combining assets in M&A and partnerships. Third, we use the ideas from both of these sections to explore how business and industries innovate. Usually offered every year.
Benjamin Gomes-Casseres

BUS 269f Building Sustainable Business
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
A commitment to corporate sustainability affects business practices, values, and culture. This survey course examines the influence of corporate sustainability on internal operations, supply chain management, employee engagement, product development, market communications, strategic planning, corporate compliance, and investor relations. Highly recommended as an introduction to the field. Usually offered every year.
Mitch Tyson

BUS 272a Operations Management
Explores how different business strategies require different business processes, and, conversely, how different operational capabilities support different strategies to gain competitive advantage. Topics may include inventory management, cycle time management, supply chain management, quality management, and process management and improvement, as well as recent developments such as lean or world-class manufacturing, just-in-time operations, time-based competition, and business reengineering. Usually offered every year.
Brad Morrison

BUS 274f Supply Chain Analytics
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Instructs students how to optimize supply chain processes so that they can achieve a company's strategic goal of either efficiency or responsiveness. The course will cover supply chain metrics, production planning, inventory control and supply chain coordination. We will also investigate global supply chain design, logistics, and outsourcing. Usually offered every year.
Lawrence Strauss

BUS 276a Business Dynamics: Managing in a Complex World
A study of why so many business strategies generate disappointing results or outright failure. Case studies include successful applications of system dynamics in growth strategy, management of technology, operations, project management, and implementation of improvement programs. Usually offered every year.
Brad Morrison

BUS 278f Corporate Governance: From Colossal Failures to Best Practices
Prerequisite: FIN 212a or FIN 213a. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
How the board of directors, management, shareholders, and an external auditor should work. How individual goals and external pressures influence individuals, and how their decisions impact a corporation's failure or success. Focuses on the United States with comparisons to Europe and Asia. Usually offered every year.
Erich Schumann

BUS 279f Corporate Fraud: Detection and Prevention
Prerequisite: FIN 212a. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Exposes students to the problem of fraudulent financial reporting, including its causes, impact, and practical, cost-effective responses. Using actual and simulated case material, students will acquire skills needed to identify, investigate, and report findings on corporate fraud. Usually offered every year.
Erich Schumann

BUS 280f Operational Risk Management
Prerequisite: FIN 212a or FIN 213a. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Today's managers must be able to assess the risk profile of their business and respond to issues as they arise. Examines how companies are dealing with massive changes in legislation that have made executives in the U.S. and abroad fully accountable for effective operational risk management and how they are using the Enterprise Risk Management framework of COSO and COBIT, and the Balanced Scorecard. Usually offered every year.
Erich Schumann

BUS 291g General Education Seminar
Open only to IBS students. Enrollment is limited. Yields one-fourth course credit (one credit). May be repeated for credit as the seminar topic varies.
Addresses a narrow, important topic and is taught jointly by an IBS faculty member and a prominent outside expert. Each seminar involves nine hours of structured learning and discussion. Usually offered every year.
Staff

BUS 292a Marketing Field Project
Prerequisite: BUS 252a or permission of the instructor. Open to IBS MAief and MBA students only. May be repeated once for credit.
Students work in teams on marketing projects for external sponsors. This course provides an opportunity for students to apply their skills and knowledge to solving real-world problems under the supervision of a faculty member. The course culminates in a final presentation to the sponsor before the end of the semester in which it is undertaken. Field Projects serve as a transition point for students from education to professional practice. Requires a strong foundation in marketing, along with good presentation and teamwork skills. Usually offered every year.
Sharon Thomas

BUS 293a Real Estate Field Project
Prerequisite: BUS 235f or permission of the instructor. Open to IBS MAief and MBA students only. May be repeated once for credit.
Students work in teams on real estate projects for external sponsors. This course provides an opportunity for students to apply their skills and knowledge to solving real-world problems under the supervision of a faculty member. The course culminates in a final presentation to the sponsor before the end of the semester in which it is undertaken. Field Projects serve as a transition point for students from education to professional practice. Requires a strong foundation in real estate, along with good presentation and teamwork skills. Usually offered every year.
Linda Stoller

BUS 294a Data Analytics Field Project
Prerequisite: BUS 211f or permission of the instructor. Open to IBS MAief and MBA students only. May be repeated once for credit.
Students work in teams on data analytics projects for external sponsors. This course provides an opportunity for students to apply their skills and knowledge to solving real-world problems under the supervision of a faculty member. The course culminates in a final presentation to the sponsor before the end of the semester in which it is undertaken. Field Projects serve as a transition point for students from education to professional practice. Requires a strong foundation in data analytics, along with good presentation and teamwork skills. Usually offered year.
Ahmad Namini

BUS 295a Field Projects
May be repeated for a total of 8 credits in BUS 295a and BUS 295f with permission of Program Director.
Students work in teams on projects for external sponsors. This course provides an opportunity for students to apply their skills and knowledge to solving real-world problems under the supervision of a faculty member. The course culminates in a final presentation to the sponsor before the end of the semester in which it is undertaken. Field Projects serve as a transition point for students from education to professional practice. Requires a strong foundation in business, along with good presentation and teamwork skills. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

BUS 295c Field Projects: Social Innovation Impact
Yields half-course credit.
Provides the opportunity to advance the students' strategic, tactical, and personal leadership capabilities. Central to this class, students assume a high stakes assignment for social impact organization that will include board level engagement. Usually offered every year.
Staff

BUS 295f Field Projects
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. May be repeated for a total of 8 credits in BUS 295a and BUS 295f with permission of Program Director.
Students work in teams on projects for external sponsors. This course provides an opportunity for students to apply their skills and knowledge to solving real-world problems under the supervision of a faculty member. The course culminates in a final presentation to the sponsor before the end of the semester in which it is undertaken. Field Projects serve as a transition point for students from education to professional practice. Requires a strong foundation in business, along with good presentation and teamwork skills. Enrollment by permission of instructor. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

BUS 297a Internship
Prerequisite: Two semesters at IBS or permission of program director. Yields half-course credit. May be repeated for credit up to 3 times (6 credits) for IBS MAief and MBA students only. MSF students may take only once.
Offers students an opportunity to apply the theories and key themes covered in the core courses in a real-life setting. Requires completion of at least six weeks of a paid or unpaid internship approved and monitored by a faculty advisor. The project could involve a research or consulting assignment or a structured internship in the school's fields. Interested students should consult the guidelines established by the school. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

BUS 297c Leadership Internships in Social Impact Organizations
Yields half-course credit per semester. Both semesters are required.
Provides an opportunity for students to individually assume high level strategic, tactical and/or leadership assignments in social impact organizations. Students may become a non-voting board fellow as part of their assignment and/or may be providing board level strategic and tactical consulting, depending on the nature of the host organization and the scope of each student's particular assignment. All opportunities will provide a forum for students to develop and amplify their own unique brand of high stakes contributions to real world social impact organizations. Usually offered every year.
Gene Miller

BUS 297g Internship
Prerequisite: Two semesters at IBS or permission of program director. Yields quarter-course credit. This course may be repeated twice for credit.
Offers students an opportunity to apply the theories and key themes covered in the core courses in a real-life setting. Requires completion of at least six weeks of a paid or unpaid internship approved and monitored by a faculty advisor. The project could involve a research or consulting assignment or a structured internship in the school's fields. Interested students should consult the guidelines established by the school. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

BUS 298a Independent Study
Normally available for a student who wishes to pursue advanced reading on research in a subject or field not available in the department's course listings. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

BUS 298f Independent Study
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
See BUS 298a for course description.
Staff

BUS 299a Master's Project
Prerequisite: Two semesters at IBS or permission of program director.
A student wishing to complete a master's project under the guidance of a faculty advisor may enroll in this course during his or her second year in the master's program. Projects may involve a short analytical thesis, the solution of an applied problem, or a report on work completed in an appropriate internship. In exceptional cases a student may undertake a master’s thesis so demanding that it requires two semesters. In such cases, with careful consideration of the faculty adviser and the program director, the student may enroll in this course for his/her two final semesters. Usually offered every year.
Staff

BUS 398a Independent Study
Normally available for a PhD student who wishes to pursue advanced reading under the direction of a faculty member. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

BUS/ECON 265a Business and Economic Strategies in Emerging Markets
Formerly offered as BUS 265a.
Studies the economic strategies followed by emerging markets and examines the differences in the business environment in emerging and developed markets. We then zoom in and study the strategies of firms that successfully (and unsuccessfully) do business in emerging markets. We analyze strategy in large and small entrepreneurial firms, particularly social enterprises that target the base of the pyramid. Usually offered every year.
Aldo Musacchio

BUS/FIN 241f Machine Learning and Data Analysis for Business and Finance
Prerequisites: ECON 184a or ECON 213a and working knowledge of the Python computer language, calculus, basic matrix algebra and Excel.
Offers a general topics course on machine learning tools, and their implementation through Python and Scikit Learn. Students will finish the class with a basic understanding of how to execute predictive analytic algorithms in both cross sectional and time series environments. They will also have a good sense for how to evaluate and test the predictive models. Usually offered every year.
Blake LeBaron

ECON 201a Global Economic Environment
Open to IBS students only.
A look at global economic environments from the perspective of all stakeholders, including governments, businesses, consumers, labor, rich, and poor. Takes a multidisciplinary approach drawing on international politics, economy, finance, and business management. The course is divided in two major themes: the economic finance dimension and the political social dimension. Not offered in 2018-2019.
John Ballantine

ECON 202a Applied International Macroeconomics
Using countries to illustrate, this course covers domestic and international macroeconomics. Topics include the goals and functioning of monetary authorities, financial crises, international competitiveness and PPP, exchange rate regimes, hyperinflation, and the sustainability of government finances. Students also master basic skills for manipulating and presenting macroeconomic information. Usually offered every year.
Carol Osler

ECON 206f Microeconomics for Business
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Introduces the essentials of microeconomic concepts with an emphasis on managerial relevance for decision-making. Topics include the analysis of market demand, firm's production decisions, and optimal pricing strategy under various market conditions such as monopoly and oligopoly. Not offered in 2018-2019.
Staff

ECON 207a Managerial Economics
Teaches students to apply basic microeconomic concepts to business and management decision-making. Key concepts include consumer behavior, properties of market supply and demand, firm's production decisions, market structures, government interventions in the markets, and optimal pricing strategy under various market conditions such as monopoly and oligopoly. Usually offered every year.
Alice Hsiaw

ECON 210f Foundations of Statistics
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Intended for students with little or no prior coursework in statistics. Introduction to statistical thinking and analytic methods, emphasizing business decision-making. Considerable use of statistical software (Stata), readings, cases, and projects permits focus on concepts, models, and interpretation of results. Topics include descriptive statistics, financial models, estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis. Not offered in 2018-2019.
Staff

ECON 213a Applied Econometrics with R
May not be taken for credit by students who took ECON 184b.
Aims at introducing econometric models and empirical techniques that are useful to conduct economic research with data. The course covers linear regression models, discrete choice models, time series models, and panel data models. We will devote significant space to empirical applications, and give the students the opportunity to gain hands-on experience on how to conduct empirical work in econometrics using the R programming language. Usually offered every year.
Benjamin Koskinen and Davide Pettenuzzo

ECON 217f Game Theory and Business Strategy
Prerequisites: ECON 207a or an intermediate microeconomics course. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
In economics, a "game" is a situation in which the best course of action depends on what others choose to do. This course studies game theory as a form of strategic analysis that can be applied to a myriad of business settings, the foremost of which is economic competition. Not offered in 2018-2019.
Benjamin Koskinen

ECON 235a Central Banking Seminar
Prerequisites: ECON 82b or ECON 202a.
Studies the origins of banks and central banks; old and new debates about monetary policy including inflation targeting: sophisticated questions such as whether central banks should pay interest on reserves; and finally the appropriate policies for central banks in a financially turbulent world. Each week students read a substantial amount and synthesize it in a short paper. Class is devoted to discussion. Each student makes two presentations. Usually offered every year.
Lynn Browne

ECON 241a Antitrust Economics: Regulating Competition
Prerequisites: ECON 80a or ECON 207a.
Studies antitrust economics and economic regulation. The first part of the course will introduce the student to the economics of antitrust and to the economic theories and tools needed to understand and conduct antitrust policy analysis. The second part of the course will focus on economic regulation and introduce the student to the theory and practice of economic regulation involving the basics of natural monopoly regulation as applied to public utilities such as electricity, gas, water and telecommunications. Usually offered every year.
Agustin Ros

ECON 252f The Economy of China
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Provides an analytical overview of China's economic transformation, emphasizing the period since 1980. Topics covered include the reform process, the role of institutions, including the financial and fiscal sectors, corporate governance reform, trade and foreign direct investment, science and technology, regional and income disparities, and the changing laws, practice, and culture that define the role of business within China. Not offered in 2018-2019.
Staff

ECON 253a Asia: Center of World Economy
With half of the world's population, one quarter of its output, and twice its growth rate, Asia is emerging as the center of the world economy. This course examines Asia's economic dynamism and the companies, investments, and policies that are shaping its future. Not offered in 2018-2019.
Peter Petri

ECON 260a International Trade Policy and Institutions
Prerequisite: Intermediate Microeconomics or ECON 207a.
Develops the fundamental economic theories behind the various policies that regulate and interfere with international trade. Examines the predominant national and international institutions that are charged with administering these policies as well as the scope and process for potential reform. Not offered in 2018-2019.
Judith Dean

ECON 261a Empirical Analysis of Trade Policy
Prerequisites: One semester of econometrics, at either the undergraduate or graduate level, and one semester of international trade, at either the undergraduate or graduate level.
Explores contemporary trade policy issues, with a focus on emerging markets, while helping students learn advanced econometric techniques. Students read professional empirical studies to learn what we know and carry out their own original research on a policy issue, from data collection to econometric testing and evaluation. Usually offered every year.
Judith Dean

ECON 270a Economic Development Strategies
Prerequisites: At least one semester of undergraduate microeconomics and one semester of undergraduate macroeconomics, or the equivalent.
Discusses the current situation of developing countries and the main theories of development and underdevelopment. Introduces the field and tools of development economics, explores the theoretical and policy debates around developing economies, and looks at alternative development strategies. Not offered in 2018-2019.
Staff

ECON 281f Challenges in the Global Economy: International Trade and Development
Prerequisites: ECON 202a and ECON 260a. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Focuses on the current challenges in trade policy and economic development. Students will apply tools and concepts from international trade, microeconomics, development and statistics to analyze key issues facing policymakers and international organizations. Usually offered every year.
Judith Dean

ECON 282f Challenges in the Global Economy: Macroeconomic Policy and Finance
Prerequisite: ECON 202a, ECON 207a, ECON 213a, FIN 201a, and FIN 212a or FIN 213a. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Focuses on current challenges in growth, monetary, fiscal and regulatory policy. Students will apply tools and concepts from international macroeconomic, finance, accounting and statistics to analyze key issues facing policymakers and international organizations. Usually offered every year.
Stephen Cecchetti

ECON 297a Internship
Prerequisite: Two semesters at IBS or permission of program director. This course yields half-course credit. May be repeated for credit up to 3 times (6 credits) for IBS MAief and MBA students only. MSF students may take only once.
Offers students an opportunity to apply the theories and key themes covered in the core courses in a real-life setting. Requires completion of at least six weeks of a paid or unpaid internship approved and monitored by a faculty advisor. The project could involve a research or consulting assignment or a structured internship in the school's fields. Interested students should consult the guidelines established by the school. Usually offered every year.
Staff

ECON 297g Internship
Prerequisite: Two semesters at IBS or permission of program director. This course yields quarter-course credit. This course may be repeated twice for credit.
Offers students an opportunity to apply the theories and key themes covered in the core courses in a real-life setting. Requires completion of at least six weeks of a paid or unpaid internship approved and monitored by a faculty advisor. The project could involve a research or consulting assignment or a structured internship in the school's fields. Interested students should consult the guidelines established by the school. Usually offered every year.
Staff

ECON 298a Independent Study
Normally available for a student who wishes to pursue advanced reading or research in a subject or field not available in the department's course listings. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

ECON 298f Independent Study
Open only to IBS students. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Normally available for a student who wishes to pursue advanced reading on research in a subject or field not available in the department's course listings. Usually offered every year.
Staff

ECON 299a Master's Project
Prerequisite: Two semesters at IBS or permission of program director.
A student wishing to complete a master's project under the guidance of a faculty advisor may enroll in this course during his or her second year in the master's program. Projects may involve a short analytical thesis, the solution of an applied problem, or a report on work completed in an appropriate internship. In exceptional cases a student may undertake a master’s thesis so demanding that it requires two semesters. In such cases, with careful consideration of the faculty adviser and the program director, the student may enroll in this course for his/her two final semesters. Usually offered every year.
Staff

ECON 301a Advanced Microeconomics I
Prerequisites: Microeconomics and math.
Study of the theories of microeconomics, including optimization, theory of the firm, theory of the consumer, duality theory, general equilibrium, welfare economics, public goods, and externalities. Usually offered every second year.
Linda Bui

ECON 302a Advanced Microeconomics II
Prerequisites: ECON 301a.
This course will focus on game theory with specific emphasis on its application to firm behavior, information economics, and the study of market organization including auctions. Important contributions of behavioral economics will also be address in this course. A strong emphasis will be placed on acquiring the tools that are required for economic research. Usually offered every second year.
Maya Eden

ECON 303a Advanced Macroeconomics I
Prerequisites: course work in microeconomics and mathematics.
Study of modern theories of short-run and long-run determination of aggregate income. Topics include private consumption and investment behavior, fiscal policy, the current account and exchange rates, economic growth, and stochastic dynamic programming with applications to macroeconomics. Usually offered every second year.
George Hall

ECON 304a Advanced Macroeconomics II
Prerequisite: ECON 303a.
Current research issues in macroeconomics, such as the impact of supply shocks, real demand shocks, and monetary shocks on output, interest rates, and exchange rates. Empirical studies and testing of competing macroeconomic theories. Usually offered every second year.
Jean-Paul L'Huillier

ECON 307f Empirical Methods for Dynamic Economic Models
Prerequisite: ECON 304a. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
An advanced topics course on contemporary methods to solve, estimate, and evaluate structural models. Usually offered every second year.
George Hall

ECON 311a Advanced Econometrics I
Prerequisites: Statistics and math.
Econometric theory and applications. Discusses the statistical theory of regression modeling and associated hypothesis testing, with emphasis on the construction, interpretation, and use of econometric models. Usually offered every second year.
Tymon Słoczyński

ECON 312a Advanced Econometrics II
Prerequisite: ECON 311a or consent of instructor.
Examines the models and statistical techniques used to study time series data. Topics will include linear and non-linear univariate as well as multivariate econometric models. One objective of the course is to provide the students with a good understanding of econometric models for time series data. These models are widely used in the empirical literature, and a good understanding of these models is crucial for the second objective of the course: to provide the students with the ability to evaluate recent empirical studies. The third objective of the course is to develop practical skills, which are necessary to perform independent research using real world data. A theme throughout the course is the use of computational methods for analyzing the material covered in class, and throughout the course we will rely heavily on examples and applications with Matlab. Usually offered every second year.
Davide Pettenuzzo

ECON 330a International Macroeconomics
Prerequisite: ECON 304a.
Applications of macroeconomic theory to open economies. Topics include international parity theorems, models of exchange rate determination, and central bank management of the exchange-rate. Usually offered every year.
Raphael Schoenle

ECON 340a Empirical Industrial Organization
Prerequisite: ECON 302a.
Examines the theoretical and empirical methods that are used in the study of firm and industry behavior. Topics include price discrimination, oligopoly behavior, product differentiation, auctions, and market structure. The course places a strong focus on the questions that are being asked, the empirical and theoretical methodology used to address these questions, and the sources of data. A primary purpose of this course is to prepare students for the thesis process and for presenting thesis work. Usually offered every second year.
Benjamin Shiller

ECON 360a International Trade Theory
Open only to IBS students.
Analyzes the economic issues involved in the integration into world markets of trade in consulting and professional services, investment, financial and banking services, telecommunications, and transportation. Also addresses the tradeoffs in regulating services trade through the WTO's General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), regional initiatives, as well as conflict areas and dispute settlement. Usually offered every second year.
Judith Dean

ECON 370a Development Economics
Prerequisite: ECON 302a.
Reviews neoclassical and endogenous growth theory as it relates to the experience of developing countries. Also examines recent applied work relating to household fertility, natural resource depletion, technology, and sustainable growth, and various political economy issues, including the link between inequality and growth, the interaction between economic growth and political systems, and a range of issues that engage the new institutional economics. Usually offered every second year.
Gary Jefferson

ECON 398a Independent Study
Normally available for a PhD student who wishes to pursue advanced reading under the direction of a faculty member. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

ECON 399a Dissertation Workshop
Prerequisites: ECON 302a and ECON 304a.
Involves invited lectures by Brandeis faculty and other researchers. Presentation and discussion of dissertation topics and work in progress. Usually offered every year.
Linda Bui

ECON/FIN 209a Behavioral Finance and Economics
Prerequisites: ECON 207a or intermediate microeconomics and statistics. May not be taken for credit by students who took ECON/FIN 209f in prior years.
How do economic agents make decisions? Though economists historically assumed that decisions are made "rationally," the evidence suggests otherwise. Examines evidence on human decision-making processes culled from many disciplines. Students investigate how those processes can explain observed patterns in economic and financial behavior. They also analyze how such behavior can explain observed market phenomena that would not emerge if agents were "personally rational." Not offered in 2018-2019.
Alice Hsiaw

ECON/FIN 250a Forecasting in Finance and Economics
Prerequisites: FIN 201a or FIN 203a and ECON 213a.
Covers the basics of forecasting and time series analysis as used in finance and economics. Time series topics will include linear regression, ARMA models, trend modeling, seasonal adjustments, and volatility modeling. We will also cover more unusual topics such as bootstrapping, and technical trading rules. Students will leave the course with a good introduction to many of the tools used in modern time series forecasting and quantitative finance. Usually offered every semester.
Blake LeBaron

ECON/FIN 291g Quant Lab Seminar
Offered exclusively on a credit/no credit basis. Open only to IBS students. Enrollment is limited; signature of the instructor is required. Yields one-fourth course credit. May be repeated for credit as the seminar topic varies.
Students will learn the basics of a programming language and its applications for data analytics in economics, business and finance. The course is graded on the basis of a final project that requires original coding to solve a particular problem or to analyze an original data set. Students are expected to attend class, watch tutorial videos, complete problem sets and work on the final project. Usually offered every year.
Staff

FIN 201a Investments
Prerequisite: Statistics. May not be taken for credit by students who have taken Econ 171a.
Covers topics related to financial economics, including investors' attitudes toward risk, capital allocation, portfolio selection, asset pricing models (Capital Asset Pricing Model and the Arbitrage Pricing Theory), the efficient market hypothesis, fixed income markets, equity valuation, and options and futures markets. Usually offered every semester.
John Ballantine, Patrick Herb, and Anna Scherbina

FIN 202a Corporate Finance
Prerequisite: FIN 201a and FIN 212a.
Focuses on how companies make their investment, financing, and dividend decisions in a global environment. Examines the theory and practices of firms through a combination of current articles, problems in the text, and case analysis. Students will have a firm understanding of how companies create value through their decisions. Usually offered every semester.
Hamza Abdurezak and Yang Sun

FIN 203a Financial Management
May not be taken for credit by students who took BUS 71a, ECON 171a, FIN 201a, or FIN 202a in prior years.
Aims to develop the financial skills and logical thought processes necessary to make and implement business decisions in a global environment. The main objective is to analyze how financial managers make decisions within a framework which emphasizes the time value of money and the relationship between expected return and risk. The course also examines different techniques used by financial managers to evaluate feasibility of undertaking new projects (i.e., capital budgeting). Usually offered every year.
Jean Claude Makolo

FIN 203f International Financial Management
Prerequisites: FIN 201a, FIN 202a, FIN 212a. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Explores the characteristics of international financial markets and evaluates associated risks and benefits. Addresses the distinct risks multinationals face, the financial tools they use to manage these risks, their tax and working capital management, and their financing and investment decisions. Not offered in 2018-2019.
Staff

FIN 204a Advanced Corporate Finance Theory and Practice
Open to Master of Science in Finance (MSF) students only.
Develops depth of financial skills and logical thought processes necessary to formulate and implement corporate finance decisions in a competitive environment. Usually offered every year.
Robert Podorefsky and Anna Scherbina

FIN 212a Accounting and Financial Analysis
Develops a fundamental understanding of financial accounting and corporate reporting issues. Students will be exposed to a variety of real world applications involving for profit financial statements. More specifically, students will acquire skills allowing them to read, interpret and analyze the income statement, balance sheet and the statement of cash flows. This course will primarily address accounting standards employed in the US (GAAP) but will acquaint students with international standards (IFRS) used by other countries in numerous accounting areas. Further, issues related to the project on the convergence of standards currently being conducted by the FASB and IASB will be discussed. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on interpreting financial statements to understand how accounting information, in a variety of decision settings, can be utilized by managers. Usually offered every semester.
Brenda Anderson

FIN 213a Intermediate Financial Accounting
Prerequisite: FIN 212a or an approved an introductory course in the area of financial accounting.
Students should be familiar with the formal financial statements, transaction analysis, income measurement and accrual accounting. This course provides an extensive expansion of the introductory accounting course. Additional topics include revenue recognition, long term construction contracts, deferred taxes, capital leases, pensions, inventory valuation, dollar value LIFO, earnings per share and share based compensation. Usually offered every year.
Robert Angell

FIN 214a Managerial Accounting
Prerequisite: FIN 212a or FIN 213a.
Provides a general introduction to the concepts, problems and issues related to managerial accounting. Managerial accounting predominantly addresses the internal use of economic information regarding the resources used in the process of producing goods and providing services. Internal users of accounting information are all of those individuals that are involved in the business decision-making process of the economic entity. In the course, you will become acquainted with some of the conventional methods of internal reporting used in planning, control and decision-making. Fundamental aspects of cost behavior and cost accounting will also be discussed, but always from the perspective of the manager who must make decisions rather than the accountant who prepares the information. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Anderson

FIN 216f Financial Statement Analysis
Prerequisite: FIN 212a or FIN 213a. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Presents techniques of financial statement analysis that deepen the understanding of financial statements and the economic and strategic information they provide. Exposes students to the financial reporting environment and practices of U.S. companies. The course does not cover equity valuation. Usually offered every semester.
Matthew Petit

FIN 217f Corporate Financial Modeling
Prerequisite or corequisite: FIN 202a, FIN 203a, or FIN 204a and FIN 212a. Corequisite may be taken during module 2. Students are expected to know basic excel. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Develops skill sets required for an integrated corporate financial modeling. The course takes an approach of first developing the building blocks of financial models and integrate them into pro forma financial statements forecasting from which cash flows can be built for valuation, scenarios and sensitivity analysis. The course starts out with a quick review of critical excel skills required for this module, followed by developing coherent frameworks for financial modeling and valuation. The course culminates with students applying these modeling frameworks to real company of financial modeling project and presentation. Usually offered every semester.
Hamza Abdurezak

FIN 218f Portfolio Financial Modeling
Prerequisite or corequisite: FIN 201a or FIN 203a. Corequisite may be taken during module 2. Students are expected to know basic excel. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Introduces fundamental methods and frameworks for portfolio financial modeling. Topics covered include mean-variance- covariance portfolio optimization, Black-Litterman approach to portfolio optimization and other portfolio models. The course is designed to be hands-on implementation of these models using real data and hence requires solid understanding of matrix and array functions and how to implement them in excel or any computational software. Usually offered every semester.
Hamza Abdurezak

FIN 223f Project Finance
Prerequisites: FIN 202a or FIN 204a and FIN 217f. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines the financial, economic, political, and technological factors that affect very large, capital-intensive projects. Looks at how they are combined into a coherent structure and financed via a combination of non-recourse debt and equity. Not offered in 2018-2019.
Staff

FIN 225f Real Estate Finance
Prerequisite: BUS 235f. FIN 202a is strongly recommended. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Focuses on debt and equity financing of income-producing real property, primarily in the U.S. market. Considers real estate finance from the perspective of the users of capital (developers and property owners) and the sources of capital (lenders and equity investors). Usually offered every year.
Sara Shank

FIN 230a Trading and Exchanges
Prerequisites: FIN 201a or FIN 203a, basic statistics.
The microeconomics of financial markets, with special focus on the foreign exchange market. Topics include market structure, transparency, determination of bid-ask spreads, price discovery, common trading strategies, currency market efficiency. Usually offered every year.
Carol Osler

FIN 231f Private Equity
Prerequisites: FIN 202a, FIN 203a or FIN 204a. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Explores the history, structure, players and adjacent industries of Private Equity; the kinds of companies that make attractive candidates for investment; how PE firms add value; what they do when things go wrong; and how they create successful exits. Usually offered every semester.
Michael McKay

FIN 232a Mergers and Acquisitions Analysis
Prerequisites: FIN 201a or FIN 203f and FIN 202a or FIN 204a (may be taken concurrently).
Reviews the core concepts involved in mergers and acquisitions; value, negotiation, deal structuring, corporate strategy and valued added, financing, and tax consequences. Usually offered every semester.
Tibor Toth

FIN 235a Investing in Energy: Fossil Fuels to Cleaner Energy
How do energy companies and investors make investment decisions in our current economic/political environment? How do investors assess the risks and the long term opportunities, and what are the potential returns? And how do companies manage energy projects and implement new technologies across many markets and countries? To evaluate energy investments students need to acquire the background knowledge, the technical skills, and an appreciation of the politics of energy policy. This course will establish a broad framework of analysis and it will also let students analyze the economic viability of a specific energy project. Not offered in 2018-2019.
John Ballantine

FIN 236f Technical Analysis
Prerequisite: FIN 201a. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
From FX to equity indexes to real estate futures markets, traders rely on technically-derived signals to enter speculative positions, set protective orders, and time their exits. Provides an introduction to technical analysis and familiarizes students with strategies in common use. Usually offered every semester.
David Lundgren

FIN 237f Security Analysis
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. Prerequisites: FIN 201a and FIN 212a. FIN 216f is recommended.
Examines fundamental-based investment strategies that funds use to generate alpha or positive risk-adjusted returns, with a focus on long-short equity strategies used by hedge funds and 130/30 mutual funds. Usually offered every semester.
Michael McKay and Param Roychoudhury

FIN 240a Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Finance
Prerequisites: FIN 201a or FIN 203a and FIN 202a or FIN 204a.
Emphasizes financial decision making skills for entrepreneurs. The structure will follow the firm's life cycle, with modules on contracting, valuation, and financial planning in the entrepreneurial context, raising capital, security choice, and the structure and valuation of exit decisions in the presence of information uncertainty. Usually offered ever year.
Debarshi Nandy

FIN 241f Financial Planning and Control
Prerequisite: FIN 202a or FIN 204a (may be taken concurrently). Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines financial planning methodologies and tools as well as financial control mechanisms. Includes case studies using real-life examples, accounting, and financial objectives. Not offered in 2018-2019.
Staff

FIN 242f Credit Risk Analysis
Prerequisite: FIN 212a. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines credit risk (i.e., the possibility that an obligor will fail to perform as agreed) from the perspective of the commercial banker. Focuses on a sound understanding of the firm and its business plan and how the banker constructs the appropriate structure for the senior loan. Topics include asset-based, real estate, and cash flow lending. Usually offered every semester.
Edward Bayone and Robert Piepenburg

FIN 247a Transfer Pricing Theory and Practice
Prerequisites: FIN 202a, FIN 203a, or FIN 204a and FIN 212a.
Introduces the economics of transfer pricing (a "price setting" exercise adopted by multinational enterprises among divisions within an enterprise). This course draws upon students' multi-disciplinary training across accounting, economics, and finance and applies them to the theory and practice of transfer pricing. Usually offered every year.
Shanto Ghosh

FIN 248f Advanced Corporate Finance
Prerequisites: FIN 201a and FIN 202a. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. May not be taken for credit by students who have taken FIN 204a.
Develops the "art and science" of optimal strategic decision-making by applying corporate financial theory to cases of financial policy, financial instruments and valuation. The topic areas are: corporate restructuring with an international flavor; raising capital using hybrid securities; and IPO's and the market for corporate control. Not offered in 2018-2019.
Staff

FIN 252f Banking, Central Banking, and the International Finance System
Prerequisite: FIN 201a. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Examines the evolving architecture of the international financial system. Discusses the nature of international banking, including the role of shadow banks; central banking and the fragility of the financial system and why it is prone to crises; and finally, the government's involvement in the financial system, exploring the rationale and structure of regulation. Not offered in 2018-2019.
Staff

FIN 254a Modern Finance, Fintech and Beyond
Prerequisite: FIN 201a or FIN 203a.
Examines the modern financial system. First to be discussed is the nature of banking, including the role of shadow banks. We will then proceed to discuss financial regulation, why we need it and how it is changing followed by discussing central banking, examining the role of central banks in the economy. In the last part of the course, we bring the various strands together--banks, shadow banks, regulation and central banks--to examine the future of finance. Usually offered every year.
Stephen Cecchetti

FIN 255f World Financial Centers
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. Open only to students who completed FIN 255a in a prior semester.
Meets each summer in a financial center of global significance. Provides analysis of international financial markets, institutions, and regulatory systems in the host center. Explores their relationship with global financial trends and systems. Includes examining the microstructure of markets, equity trading, futures and options, mergers and acquisitions, banking and currencies, and regional issues of topical interest. Not offered in 2018-2019.
Staff

FIN 261a Fixed Income Securities
Prerequisites: FIN 201a or FIN 203a, or permission of the instructor.
Studies fixed income securities; cash flow structures, pricing risk measures; features of major fixed income sectors; valuation of fixed income securities with embedded options; portfolio management and performance measurement; interest rate derivatives and applications to asset/liability management. Usually offered every semester.
James Leu and Robert Podorefsky

FIN 263a International Portfolio Management
Prerequisite: FIN 201a or FIN 203a.
A blend of advanced theory and state-of-the-art practice with a two fold aim: to ground students in the theory of international portfolio investments and to immerse them in the application of global portfolio management in the real world. Usually offered every semester.
Christopher Alt and Jay Leu

FIN 270a Options and Derivatives
Prerequisites: FIN 201a, or permission of the instructor.
Introduces students, using a reasonably formal mathematical approach, to a broad range of topics related to the traded securities, markets, pricing, and applications of financial derivatives. Special focus is placed on how replication is used to price financial derivatives. Derivatives studied include those defined on commodities, currencies, equities and equity indexes, with an introduction to fixed income derivatives. Usually offered every semester.
Eric Nierenberg, Robert Reitano, and Qingxi Xia

FIN 271a Options & Derivatives II
Prerequisites: FIN 270a.
Focuses on numerical methods for pricing various kinds of financial derivatives, with the first third of the lectures focused on reviewing and deepening the understanding of the calculations and models introduced in Options and Derivatives (i.e., FIN 270a). The second third of the course will study Monte Carlo numerical methods for these and related derivatives as well as the pricing of credit derivatives. The final third of the course will focus on interest rate derivatives. The level of mathematics for this courses is the same as FIN 270a. Usually offered every year.
Robert Reitano

FIN 279a Applied Risk Management
Prerequisites: FIN 201a and FIN 212a.
Studies risk management in a variety of contexts as well as the applications of financial derivatives. Focuses on case studies from many industries which address risks related to commodities, weather, foreign exchange rates, interest rate, and credit, and also corporate governance matters and integrated risk management. Students will be expected to be able to analyze a corporate risk situation, work through examples and develop hedging strategies. Usually offered every year.
Robert Reitano

FIN 280a Financial Risk Management
Prerequisite: FIN 201a, FIN 270a or FIN 279a.
Introduces many of the approaches financial institutions (investment and commercial banks, hedge funds, insurance companies and pension plans) take to model, quantify, and manage risk. Types of risks covered include financial (equity, currency, interest rate, and credit), as well as operational. The Basel II and Solvency II regulatory frameworks to risk management will also be studied. Students will be expected to have good exposure to financial derivatives from the prerequisite courses as well as to the basic concepts from calculus and statistics. Usually offered every year.
Robert Reitano

FIN 285a Computer Simulations and Risk Assessment
Prerequisite: FIN 201a or FIN 203a.
Examines recent advances in computational methods for evaluation risk and decision making in risky situations. Emphasizes a common computational framework for solving many problems from business, finance, and economics using statistical methods, such as Monte Carlo and resampling. Usually offered every year.
Qingxi Xia

FIN 288a Corporate Financial Engineering
Prerequisite: FIN 201a. Corequisite: FIN 202a or FIN 204a.
Focuses on how financial engineering is used in firms to reduce their costs of financing, to alter their fundamental risk exposures and, in a handful of cases, to provide them with new ways to compete. Primarily intended for students who plan to serve in corporate roles that will involve significant interaction with financial markets and institutions. Usually offered every second year.
Hamza Abdurezak

FIN 291g General Education Seminar
Open only to IBS students. Enrollment is limited. Yields one-fourth course credit (one credit). May be repeated for credit as the seminar topic varies.
Addresses a narrow, important topic and is taught jointly by an IBS faculty member and a prominent outside expert. Each seminar involves nine hours of structured learning and discussion. Usually offered every year.
Staff

FIN 292a Internship
Prerequisite: Two full semesters of MSF coursework (at least 32 credits). Open to Master of Science in Finance (MSF) students only.
Provides an opportunity for MSF students to carry out a formal internship with a client organization under the supervision of a faculty member. The internship requires students to apply principles and frameworks from the MSF curriculum for a client organization seeking help with a management-related challenge. Along with FIN 293a, the Field Project in Finance, the internship serves as a transition point for students from education to professional practice. Usually offered every year.
Staff

FIN 293a Field Project in Finance
Prerequisite: One full semester of MSF coursework (at least 16 credits). Open to Master of Science in Finance (MSF) students only.
Provides a unique and valuable educational opportunity for MSF students to apply their skills and knowledge in a real world setting. Under the supervision of a faculty member, students will partner with a sponsoring firm to work deeply on a theme or question. The course culminates in a final presentation to the sponsor before the end of the semester in which it is undertaken. Each field projects team will consist of 4 to 5 students and an instructor. The primary student outcome is to gain experience evaluating and analyzing financial questions conduct in-depth and sophisticated analysis and market research and understand how financial decisions are taken in a corporation. Along with FIN 292a Internship, Field Project in Finance serves as a transition point for students from education to professional practice. Usually offered every year.
Staff

FIN 294a Directed Research
Prerequisite: Two full semesters of MSF coursework (at least 32 credits). Open to Master of Science in Finance (MSF) students only.
Provides an opportunity for MSF students to carry out a detailed directed research and independent study under the supervision of a faculty member. Directed Research requires students to apply principles and frameworks from the MSF curriculum to identify and analyze a financial question/puzzle that broadens the students understanding and knowledge on that particular issue and could potentially help the student in his/her job search. As Directed Research necessarily requires an advanced understanding of finance knowledge it is expected that students would have completed related coursework prior to undertaking this course. Usually offered every year.
Staff

FIN 297a Internship
Prerequisite: Two semesters at IBS or permission of program director. Yields half course-credit. May be repeated for credit up to 3 times (6 credits) for IBS MAief and MBA students only. MSF students may take only once.
Offers students an opportunity to apply the theories and key themes covered in the core courses in a real-life setting. Requires completion of at least six weeks of a paid or unpaid internship approved and monitored by a faculty advisor. The project could involve a research or consulting assignment or a structured internship in the school's fields. Interested students should consult the guidelines established by the school. Usually offered every year.
Staff

FIN 297b Field Project Internship
Prerequisite: Two semesters at IBS or permission of program director. Yields half-course credit. May not be repeated for credit.
Offers students an opportunity to apply the theories and key themes covered in the core courses in a real-life setting. Requires completion of at least six weeks of a paid or unpaid internship approved and monitored by a faculty advisor. The project could involve a research or consulting assignment or a structured internship in the school's fields. Interested students should consult the guidelines established by the school. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

FIN 297g Internship
Prerequisite: Two semesters at IBS or permission of program director. Yields quarter course-credit. May be repeated twice for credit.
Offers students an opportunity to apply the theories and key themes covered in the core courses in a real-life setting. Requires completion of at least six weeks of a paid or unpaid internship approved and monitored by a faculty advisor. The project could involve a research or consulting assignment or a structured internship in the school's fields. Interested students should consult the guidelines established by the school. Usually offered every year.
Staff

FIN 298a Independent Study
Normally available for a student who wishes to pursue advanced reading or research in a subject or field not available in the department's course listings. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

FIN 298b Independent Study
Course yields half-course credit.
Normally available for a student who wishes to pursue advanced reading on research in a subject or field not available in the department's course listings. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

FIN 298f Independent Study
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Normally available for a student who wishes to pursue advanced reading or research in a subject or field not available in the department's course listings. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

FIN 299a Master's Project
Prerequisite: Two semesters at IBS or permission of program director.
A student wishing to complete a master's project under the guidance of a faculty advisor may enroll in this course during his or her second year in the master's program. Projects may involve a short analytical thesis, the solution of an applied problem, or a report on work completed in an appropriate internship. In exceptional cases a student may undertake a master’s thesis so demanding that it requires two semesters. In such cases, with careful consideration of the faculty adviser and the program director, the student may enroll in this course for his/her two final semesters. Usually offered every year.
Staff

FIN 305f Asset Pricing
Prerequisite: ECON 301a. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
A course in asset pricing for PhD candidates. Topics include risk aversion and choice under uncertainty, no arbitrage and stochastic discount factor, mean variance analysis, factor models, and recent empirical puzzles. Focuses on theory and empirical applications. Usually offered every second year.
Blake LeBaron

FIN 306f Topics in Corporate Finance
Prerequisites: ECON 302a, ECON 304a, and ECON 184a or equivalent. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Equips students with some fundamental concepts in the field of Corporate Finance and to the tools commonly used to conduct empirical research in this field. This course exposes students to a few active research areas in empirical corporate finance and prominent papers in those areas, both to build a knowledge base and to learn to read and assess empirical research. It prepares students for producing their own high-quality, independent empirical research in corporate finance. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have developed an understanding on issues related to firm and project valuation, capital structure and security issuance decisions, payout policies, and venture capital financing. Usually offered every second year.
Debarshi Nandy

Courses of Related Interest

The following Heller courses may be taken by IBS MBA students only.

ECON 122b The Economics of the Middle East
[ nw ss ]
Prerequisite: ECON 2a or 10a or the equivalent. Does not count toward the upper-level elective requirement for the major in economics.
Examines the Middle East economies – past experiences, present situation, and future challenges – drawing on theories, policy formulations and empirical studies of economic growth, trade, poverty, income distribution, labor markets, finance and banking, government reforms, globalization, and Arab-Israeli political economy. Usually offered every year.
Nader Habibi

ECON 134b Public Sector Economics
[ ss ]
Prerequisites: ECON 80a and ECON 83a or permission of the instructor.
The effect of tax and expenditure policies on economic efficiency and equity. Topics include externalities and public goods, public choice, cost-benefit analysis, income redistribution, social security, and health care. Also discussion of U.S. tax system, public debt, and state and local finance. Usually offered every year.
Michael Coiner and Linda Bui

ECON 135a Industrial Organization
[ qr ss ]
Prerequisites: ECON 80a and ECON 83a or permission of the instructor.
Microeconomic analysis of firm behavior under alternative market structures and implications for market outcomes. Topics include strategic interaction, entry and exit, collusion, predation, price discrimination, product differentiation, vertical relations, imperfect information, advertising, and patents and innovation. Usually offered every year.
Kathryn Graddy and Benjamin Shiller

ECON 141b Economics of Innovation
[ ss ]
Prerequisites: ECON 80a and ECON 83a or permission of the instructor.
Studies the innovation and technological change as the central focus of modern economies. Topics include the sources of growth, economics of research and development, innovation, diffusion and technology transfer, appropriability, patents, information markets, productivity, institutional innovation, and global competitiveness. Usually offered every year.
Gary Jefferson

ECON 172b Money and Banking
[ ss ]
Prerequisites: ECON 82b and ECON 83a or permission of the instructor.
Examines the relationship of the financial system to real economic activity, focusing especially on banks and central banks. Topics include the monetary and payments systems; financial instruments and their pricing; the structure, management, and regulation of bank and nonbank financial intermediaries and the design and operations of central banks in a modern economy. Usually offered every year.
Scott Redenius

ECON 173a Central Banking: Theory and Policy
[ ss wi ]
Prerequisite: ECON 82b.
Studies the purposes and functions of central banks over time and the challenges they confront. Examines central banks' roles in the recent financial crisis and explores current debates over the policies that central banks are following in its aftermath. Usually offered every year.
Lynn Browne

ECON 175a Introduction to the Economics of Development
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: ECON 2a or 10a or permission of the instructor. Does not count toward the upper-level elective requirement for the major in economics.
An introduction to various models of economic growth and development and evaluation of these perspectives from the experience of developing and industrial countries. Usually offered every second year.
Nidhiya Menon

ECON 182a Topics in Advanced Macroeconomics
[ ss ]
Prerequisite: ECON 80a, 82b, and 83a.
Contemporary theories of economic growth, business cycles, monetary economics, and financial crises and their implications for monetary and fiscal policy. Emphasis on empirical work and computer modeling. Usually offered every year.
George Hall

ECON 184b Econometrics
[ qr ss ]
Prerequisites: ECON 83a. Corequisite: ECON 80a or permission of the instructor. Students must earn a C- or higher in MATH 10a, or otherwise satisfy the calculus requirement, to enroll in this course. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have previously taken or are currently enrolled in ECON 185a or ECON 311a.
An introduction to the theory of econometric regression and forecasting models, with applications to the analysis of business and economic data. Usually offered every year.
Elizabeth Brainerd, Linda Bui, and Davide Pettenuzzo

HS 244a Responsible Negotiation
Provides concepts, observations and suggestions to improve analytical and operational negotiation skills. Everyone negotiates on a daily basis, but what about doing it responsibly? Faced with projects, contracts, conflicts or crises, coping with people, problems and process, how can negotiators lever the right reflections and actions in the right direction? How can they optimize utility for themselves and for others? This course also addresses negotiation foundations on how to do first things first, i.e. how to make the right moves at the right time in order to reach the right decisions and to achieve ad hoc implementation. Usually offered every year.
Alain Lempereur

HS 257b Conflict Resolution by Negotiation
Develops in students an understanding of the nature, advantages, and limitations of negotiations as a conflict resolution tool. Provides a normative and practical framework for pursuing a negotiation strategy as a method of resolving disputes. Provides students with opportunities to apply this knowledge in a variety of simulated negotiation contexts. Finally, exposes students to feedback regarding their negotiation approaches via explicit instructor evaluation and via the impact of their actions on their teammates and opponents.
Jeffrey Prottas

HS 270a Business Law and Ethics for Managers
Provides a comprehensive introduction to U.S. legal concepts and issues with which contemporary managers should be acquainted as well as the broader ramifications of legal matters on the enterprise as a whole. Examines traditional topics such as contract law, employment law, product liability and legal structures of businesses. It will also include specialized topics such as intellectual property and internet law. Provides students with an understanding of legal issues guiding them with regard to appropriate legal treatment in a variety of settings and discusses ethical dilemmas that potentially present challenges to managers dealing with business and legal issues within organizations will be explored and discussed. Usually offered every year.
Jeffrey Rudin