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Spring 2018 Course Schedule | Thursday

Click here to view a PDF version of the Spring 2018 Course Catalog. 

Click here to view a sortable schedule of Spring 2018 courses. Sort by day, class period, duration (5 or 10 week), or category.

*Please note Who’s Afraid Of Edward Albee? Reading Selected Plays with Jyl Lynn Felman will NOT run this Spring.

To view the course schedule, click on each day of the week.

Spring 2018 courses will begin the week of March 5 and run through the week of May 14, with a break the week of April 2. There will be no courses on Patriot's Day, Monday, April 16. For the Spring 2018 schedule, click here.

If needed, make up classes will be held May 21-24

Please be sure to click on the name of the course to read the description before signing up.


Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday


Time Class

Period 1
9:30 a.m. to 10:55 a.m.

ART5-5a-Thur1   
Boston Skyline: Boom or Bust 
Mitch Fischman
5 Week Course - March 8 - April 12

FILM1-10-Thur1
The Golden Years of Foreign Films: The 50's and 60's
Naomi & Peter Schmidt
*This course will run during Periods 1 & 2.

H&G11-5a-Thur1 
An Introduction to Byzantium: the Art, History and Controversies of the Late Eastern Roman Empire
Michael St. Clair
 
5 Week Course - March 8 - April 12

H&G6-10-Thur1 
Old Settlers and New Immigrants: The Hispanic Presence in the United States
Gene Kupferschmid

H&G1-5b-Thur1 
Reflections on the Meaning of World War II
Walter Carter

Period 2
11:10 a.m. to 12:35 p.m.

FILM1-10-Thur1 
The Golden Years of Foreign Films: The 50's and 60's
Naomi & Peter Schmidt
*This course will run during Periods 1 & 2.

ART2-5b-Thur2 
Up Close and Personal: Edward Hopper 
Nancy Alimansky
5 Week Course - April 19 - May 17

LIT6-5b-Thur2 
A Life of Purpose in 20th-Century Russia
Fran Feldman
5 Week Course - April 19 - May 17

LIT14-5b-Thur2 
Great American Short Stories of the 20th Century
Edward Selig
5 Week Course - April 19 - May 24

SCI6-5a-Thur2 
What Drives Attraction? Neurobiology of Sexuality
Bradly Stone & Alyssa Fasset-Calman 
5 Week Course - March 8 - April 12

WRI2-5a-Thur2 
“You Can’t Make This Stuff Up!” Crafting Dynamic Creative Nonfiction
Sue Wurster
5 Week Course - March 8 - April 12

12:35 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Lunch, Learning, and Social Life

Period 3
2:10 p.m. to 3:35 p.m.

ART6-5a-Thur3 
Framing an Image: Art in the American Colonies
Miriam Goldman
5 Week Course - March 8 - April 12

LIT11-10-Thur3 
Moral Imagination: A Guide to the Complex
Michael Kaufman

SOC4-10-Thur3 
Sex and Gender: The Liberation Movements of the Late 20th and Early 21st Centuries
Sarah Pearlman

WRI3-5b-Thur3 
“You Can’t Make This Stuff Up!” Crafting Dynamic Creative Nonfiction
Sue Wurster 
5 Week Course - April 19 - May 17


ART5-5a-Thur1 Boston Skyline: Boom or Bust 

Leader  –  Mitch Fischman

Thursday – Course Period 1 – 9:30 am to 10:55 am
5 Week Course - March 8 - April 12
(No Class April 5 for Spring Break)

Description   Boston is currently sustaining a real estate development boom not seen in over 50 years. This course will survey Boston’s 18th and 19th century expansions; discuss mid-20thcentury urban renewal including the demolition of Boston’s West End and Scollay Square neighborhoods; consider the construction of the new Government Center and City Hall and the redevelopment of Back Bay, Prudential Center and Mass Turnpike Boston Extension; and review the design and impact of I. M. Pei’s John Hancock Building. There will be a field trip to Boston City Hall to view the Boston Planning and Development Agency (former Boston Redevelopment Authority) scale model of the Downtown, Seaport, and the Back Bay with the guidance of a BPDA planner or urban designer, and discuss the 1960’s design competition for the new city hall and plaza. During the final fifth class, we will examine 21st Century architectural trends and feature a guest speaker with Boston design or master plan expertise. Maybe you remember what Boston looked like when you were growing up. Who did you know who was active on the Boston development/architectural scene? What happened to downtown real estate during the various boom/bust periods? How did people and neighborhoods react to increasing development pressures? Each week discussion questions will be provided to serve as a study guide for discussion of that week’s readings. Individual class reports will be encouraged.

Readings   Some articles will be provided by email and there will also be a course packet and a text. The text is Boston Architecture 1975-1990 by Naomi Miller and Keith Morgan. Any edition should be fine. A Handout will be provided to each class member at the first class at a $15-20 fee, and the first week’s assignments in the handout will be sent to the class member list before the first class. 

Preparation Time  2- hrs and hopefully class members viewing some of the Boston buildings being discussed in the course.

Biography   Mitch Fischman is a planning and development permitting consultant for Boston developers, assisting them in obtaining approvals for proposed real estate projects from the Boston Planning and Development Agency (former Boston Redevelopment Authority).  As BRA Project Manager and Neighborhood Planner for 15 years, Mitch managed city/developer approvals for Copley Place, 500 Boylston Street, Prudential Center, Copley Square and other prominent downtown and Back Bay projects.  He is an urban planner with a Masters degree from University of Pittsburgh, MBA from Northeastern, and served as an Alderman (City Councilor) in Newton for 12-years. He has been a BOLLI SGL or co-SGL for three courses and twice for this course in 2015.

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FILM1-10-Thur1 The Golden Years of Foreign Films: The 50's and 60's

Leaders  –  Naomi & Peter Schmidt

Thursday – Course Periods 1 & 2 – 9:30 am to 12:35 pm

Description   The years spanning 1950 to 1969 introduced the American movie-going public to the novelty of great foreign films, providing a contrast and alternative to the standard Hollywood fare.  We invite you to join us in viewing and discussing a selection of ten such films, some serious and others more light-hearted.  Our expectation is that each will be not only enjoyable, but also thought-provoking.  In each of ten class sessions (each a double period) we will view a film together and follow with discussion, the subjects ranging from artistry and technique to symbolism and meaning.  The films that we have chosen are from a variety of countries and in a number of languages: Rashomon, La Strada, The Seventh Seal, Hiroshima Mon Amour, I’m All Right Jack, Black Orpheus, Jules et Jim, Repulsion, Blow-Up, and Z

Readings    Readings will be provided by the SGLs as email attachments.

Preparation Time    Approximately one hour per week 

Biography    Naomi Schmidt was originally trained as a physicist, taught computer science at Brandeis in the 1970s and 1980s and then worked for 16 years at both Brandeis and MIT in the field of academic computing. A BOLLI member since 2003, she has been a Study Group Leader for “Invitation to the Dance” and “Science Fiction,” as well as co-leading “Who’s Afraid of 20th Century Music?” with Peter Schmidt and “The New York Experience,” “Utopianism,  “The 1920s,” and “The 1960s” with Tamara Chernow.

Peter Schmidt’s  professional careers were in physics and machine vision engineering. After retirement, he joined BOLLI in 2006 and, over the last ten years, has given a number of courses at lifelong learning organizations in a variety of subjects, some science-related (e.g., Five Physicists Who Changed the World View; Quantum Mechanics without a Wrench), and others not (e.g., Three Masterpieces: From Drama to Film and Opera; The Humanity of Heinrich Böll: Selected Short Stories).

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H&G11-5a-Thur1 An Introduction to Byzantium: the Art, History and Controversies of the Late Eastern Roman Empire

Leader  –  Michael St. Clair

Thursday – Course Period 1 – 9:30 am to 10:55 am
5 Week Course – March 8 – April 12
(No Class April 5 for Spring Break)

Description   Around the time of Emperor Constantine, who ruled from 306-337 CE, the Roman Empire split into two parts: the Western (largely Europe) and the Eastern (Greece and Asia Minor), which was known as the Byzantine Empire. This introductory course will present some of the key issues that the Byzantine Empire faced: struggles with Islam, religious and artistic controversies (Iconoclasm), the emergence of women leaders, fascination with sports heroes and sports riots (Nike riots), the consequences of the Crusades, and financial and sexual scandals (Theodora). The course also looks closely at the ancient city of Constantinople’s architecture (Santa Sophia, fortifications, aqueducts, etc.). The course will combine class discussion with SGL presentations showing relevant sites, art objects and surviving ruins.

Readings   Lars Brownworth, Lost to the West: The Forgotten Byzantine Empire that Rescued Western Civilization (New York: Three Rivers Press, 2009) paperback
Procopius, Secret History (Penguin Paperback) (any edition)

Preparation Time   2 hours, perhaps 100 pages 

Biography   Michael St. Clair is a professor emeritus from Emmanuel College, Boston. He has taught adult learners, undergraduates and graduate students. He has taught and published in areas of art, history and psychology. He has graduate degrees in Classical Languages, Philosophy, Theology and Psychology. He should have been a medieval prince, but unfortunately wasn’t.

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H&G6-10-Thur1 Old Settlers and New Immigrants: The Hispanic Presence in the United States

Leader  –  Gene Kupferschmid

Thursday – Course Period 1 – 9:30 am to 10:55 am

Description    Nearly a century before the Pilgrims arrived at Plymouth Rock, Spaniards and Mexicans had settled in Florida and the western part of what is now the United States. Today census figures tell us that the fastest growing population in the U.S. is Hispanic, a population composed of the descendants of those early settlers and millions of recent immigrants. After a brief review of historical antecedents, we will learn more about these immigrants, primarily from Mexico and Central America, their reasons for coming here, the political response to them, and their role in the U.S. economy. Other recent events also have drawn attention to the Hispanics in this country: our changing relationship with Cuba, Puerto Rico facing a grave economic and infrastructure crisis, and a president who threatens to build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico. Big changes and new developments are taking place, and it is time for us to take a closer look at them.

Readings   Harvest of Empire: A History of Latinos in America (Revised Edition) by Juan González; Penguin Books, 2011; ISBN 978-0-144-311928-9.  There will also be a course pack at a cost of no more than $5.

Preparation Time    Varies from 25 – 75 pages per week

Biography      Gene Kupferschmid taught for 30 years at Boston College, was awarded two NEH Summer Fellowships, and has published fourteen textbooks on Spanish and Latin American language, literature and culture.  Her primary field of interest is Latin America, and she has lived in Argentina and Mexico.

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H&G1-5b-Thur1 Reflections on the Meaning of World War II

Leader  –  Walter Carter

Thursday – Course Period 1 – 9:30 am to 10:55 am 
5 Week Course - April 19 - May 17

Description    World War II was an explosive collision of geopolitical, economic and social trends that dominated most of the first half of the century and shaped trends that dominated the second half and beyond. Interpretations of WWII as an historical event are not uniform among authors and have changed over time. To approach a descriptive and instructive definition of WWII, we will review its historical antecedents, its course during 1939-1945, and its aftermath. We will look at such questions as: Was WWII ‘the good war’? Who started it? What was it about? Who were the winners and losers? Were all the winners ‘totally good’ and all the losers ‘totally bad’? Did the war and post-war actions solve all the problems that led to it? The course will be comprised of SGL presentation and class discussion. The material will be based largely on the writings of Gerhard L. Weinberg, supplemented by selected articles, reviews, and book excerpts by other authors. This class was given in the Fall 2017.

Readings   World War II: A Very Short Introduction, Gerhard L. Weinberg (Oxford University Press, 130 pp; $12.00 new), plus handouts distributed via email by the SGL.

Preparation Time   20-40 pages per week, except 80 pages in week 3

Biography  Walter Carter earned a BA degree in history from Swarthmore College, then M.A. degrees in international relations at Tufts University and economics at the University of Rochester.  He retired from McGraw-Hill as an economic forecaster.  He is currently on the board of Normandy Allies, Inc., for whom he has helped lead history-study tours of the D-Day landing area of WW II.  He is also a member of the American WWII Orphans Network.  His memoir about his father, No Greater Sacrifice, No Greater Love: A Son's Journey to Normandy, was published by the Smithsonian Institution Press in 2004.

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ART2-5b-Thur2 Up Close and Personal: Edward Hopper 

Leader  –  Nancy Alimansky

Thursday – Course Period 2 – 11:10 am to 12:35 pm 
5 Week Course – April 19 – May 17
(An identical course will also be offered on Wednesday – Course Period 2 – during the first 5 weeks)

Description     This course will focus on Edward Hopper, an icon of American art, and will use the reading and supplementary materials as a background to analyzing his art.  Particular interest will be paid to the relationship between Edward Hopper’s personal life and his work.  For this reason the assigned reading will be substantial. We will use a definitive biography by art historian Gail Levin, considered to be an expert on Hopper’s life and art.  The source materials for Levin’s book are writings by Hopper’s wife, Josephine. The class time will be divided between discussion and lecture.  Together we will analyze the content, composition, color, value and other design principles of images (some of which are referenced in the text) that will be shown in class.  By the end of the course class members will gain an understanding of who Edward Hopper was, his complicated relationship with his wife and what motivated him in his work. This course repeats material from a ten-week course given a few years ago titled “Up Close and Personal: The Lives and Art of Edward Hopper, Thomas Hart Benton and George Bellows.”

Readings   Edward Hopper, An Intimate Biography, Gail Levin, Alfred A Knopf, 1995 edition. Plenty of used copies on Amazon and also in the library. 

Preparation Time   About 100 pages a week. 

Biography   This will be Nancy Alimansky’s tenth teaching experience at BOLLI.  All her BOLLI courses have been very well received. Nancy has spent most of her professional life in the classroom.  For 26 years she was an Associate Professor at Lesley University where she taught courses in management and technology as well as studio art.  For three years as a docent at the Davis Museum at Wellesley College she conducted tours for various exhibits.  Nancy has a B.A from Wellesley College where she majored in French, a M.A.T. from Harvard Graduate School of Education and an M.B.A. from Boston College.  She has been a professional artist for more than 25 years.

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LIT6-5b-Thur2 A Life of Purpose in 20th-Century Russia

Leader  –  Fran Feldman

Thursday – Course Period 2 – 11:10 am to 12:35 pm 
5 Week Course - April 19 - May 17

Description   One yearns today for the wit, grace, and civility so deftly displayed by Count Alexander Rostov in Amor Towles’s novel A Gentleman in Moscow. Despite the nearly 100 years and 5,000 miles separating 20th-century Russia from early 21st-century America, the challenges of living a meaningful life in straitened circumstances, as described in the book, are as relevant today as they were for Count Rostov. The “life lessons” that skip across the pages of the book reflect the human condition and prod introspection and discourse. Writers, artists, and politicians who play supporting roles beg for more rounded and informed lives. And finally, the world-changing events casually dropped here and there in the text demand to be brought to life. This course is not simply a review of the book. Instead, together the class will look at, around, and beyond the text, examining what it means to live a life of purpose, how famous men of arts and letters affected the Russian spirit, and especially how the transformative events of 20th-century Russia—the Portsmouth Peace Treaty of 1905, the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution, Stalinism, the gulag, and World War II—framed the existence of a gentleman in Moscow in the last century. The SGL anticipates much lively class discussion and, because she is not an expert on modern Russian history, she also encourages class reports on events touched on in the book.

Readings   A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles

Preparation Time   Approximately 100 pages of reading a week 

Biography   Long interested in government and history, Fran Feldman majored in government at Smith College, received a Master of Arts in Teaching (in history) from Yale, and taught social studies in middle school. Later, in California, she embarked on a second career editing cooking, gardening, crafts, and home improvement books for Sunset Books. After returning home to the Boston area, she worked as an administrator and financial trainer in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard. Her passions include golf, traveling, and volunteer work. Previously at BOLLI she taught "The Remarkable Roosevelts" (Franklin and Eleanor), “Allies and Adversaries: Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft,” and “The Reluctant Ally: America’s Entry into World War II.”

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LIT14-5b-Thur2 Great American Short Stories of the 20th Century

Leader  –  Edward Selig

Thursday – Course Period 2 – 11:10 am to 12:35 pm
5 Week Course – April 19 – May 24

*Please note that this course will not meet on May 10, and will run until May 24.

Description   Publications of short stories by individual authors or in anthologies proliferate these days, prompting the question, which ones are most worth reading? Drawing upon a selection of The Best American Short Stories of the [20th] Century, edited by the celebrated author John Updike, this course will explore elements of form and content that make a story great. We will discuss “Little Selves” by Mary Lerner, “A Jury of Her Peers” by Susan Glaspell, “The Golden Honeymoon” by Ring Lardner, “The Killers” by Ernest Hemingway, “Theft” by Katherine Anne Porter, “That Evening Sun Go Down” by William Faulkner, ”The Peach Stone” by Paul Horgan, “Death of a Favorite” by J.F. Powers, “The Resemblance Between a Violin Case and a Coffin” by Tennessee Williams, “A Silver Dish” by Saul Bellow, and “Janus” by Ann Beattie. We will consider structural, stylistic and substantive elements of each story and the interplay among them, looking in every case for how inspired craftsmanship yields memorable insights into the human condition. 

Readings   Ten stories, two per class, selected from The Best American Short Stories of the Century (Ed. John Updike, Houghton Mifflin paperback, 1999)

Preparation Time    30 pages, 2 hours per week to read each story twice

Biography     Edward Selig majored in English Language and Literature at Yale, where his senior thesis was published by the Yale University Press. He graduated summa cum laude and then studied for two more years at Oxford University on a Rhodes Scholarship. His professional career centered for thirty years upon the practice of environmental law and dispute resolution.

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SCI6-5a-Thur2 What Drives Attraction? Neurobiology of Sexuality

Leaders  –  Bradly Stone and Alyssa Fasset-Calman 

Thursday – Course Period 2 – 11:10 am to 12:35 pm
5 Week Course - March 8 - April 12
(No Class April 5 for Spring Break) 

Description     The study of sexuality in the fields of psychology and biology has advanced over the past century across many subjects including medicine, sociology, and political discourse. This course will pull together research from these fields to present an overview of the history and current understandings of brain mechanisms, social constructs of behavior and language, and determinants of physical attraction that regulate mating and sexuality. We will take an evolutionary approach to the neurobiology of sexuality by reading and discussing research that has shaped our interpretation of the biological and social underpinnings of sexuality. Classes will begin with a brief discussion of the week’s reading, followed by a discussion-based lecture on the broader research field related to the week’s topic. The course’s goal is to shed light on the complexity of sexuality in view of the social, political, and linguistic facets of sex from a neurobiological standpoint.

Readings    Handouts--There will be a charge to cover copy fees, which will be determined on final selection of course readings.

Preparation Time    The readings will assist in background clarification of topics and act as discussion platforms. We estimate an average 2-3 hours/week outside of class to complete designated material prior to next meeting date.

Biography    Bradly Stone and Aly Fassett-Carman are both PhD candidates in the Neuroscience Program at Brandeis University. Brad earned his B.S. degree in Biopsychology from the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has previously worked on EEG and fMRI - based human research assessing emotion and empathy, neurophysiological biofeedback, teaming dynamics, and visual perception of threat detection. He has also worked as an adjunct faculty member teaching Psychology. Brad now works in systems neuroscience studying the role affective body states have on taste processing. Aly earned her B.A. in Neuroscience from Middlebury College where she studied learning and problem-solving behavior in octopuses. At Brandeis, she does EEG-based human research looking into empathy, social interaction, and mental health. Aly and Brad also served as teaching assistants for a biology laboratory at Brandeis this fall. 

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WRI2-5a-Thur2 “You Can’t Make This Stuff Up!” Crafting Dynamic Creative Nonfiction

Leader  –  Sue Wurster

Thursday – Course Period 2 – 11:10 am to 12:35 pm
5 Week Course – March 8 – April 12
(No Class April 5 for Spring Break)

Description    According to Lee Gutkind, founder and editor of Creative Nonfiction magazine, creative nonfiction has become the most popular genre in our literary and publishing communities, and in the academic arena, it has become the most popular way to write.  So what is creative nonfiction?  Gutkind defines the genre simply as “true stories well told.” Genres of creative nonfiction writing include personal narratives, opinion or “op-ed” pieces, feature articles, travel writing, reviews, and more.  The goal is to make our nonfiction, true stories read like fiction, captivating and enthralling readers from start to finish.  After all, when it comes to our true stories, we all know that “you just can’t make this stuff up!” In this course, we will read creative nonfiction by a variety of writers and write our own.  Each week, we’ll focus on a different genre, writing and sharing a 500-word item with the group for response. Genres explored 5a will be different from those in 5b.

Readings    On Writing Well by William Zinsser, available as pdf from instructor 

Preparation Time  There will be a short reading assignment for each week (20 minutes or so) as well as a 500-word piece of writing (however long that takes to create).

Biography    Sue Wurster earned B.S./M.A. degrees in Communications from Ohio University, taught speech at St. Cloud State, writing at Elizabeth Seton College, drama at the Chapin and Calhoun schools, and English/Humanities at Nashoba Brooks School. She studied at Northwestern’s School of Speech, NYC’s New Actors’ Workshop, Bank Street College, and Columbia University.  She served as national chair of the high school division of the American Alliance for Theatre in Education, director of New York State’s Forensics League, and co-founding chair of the Massachusetts Middle School Speech League.  (She is often referred to as “Wurster, the Wily Word Woman.”)

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ART6-5a-Thur3 Framing an Image: Art in the American Colonies

Leader  –  Miriam Goldman

Thursday – Course Period 3 – 2:10 pm to 3:35 pm 
5 Week Course – March 8 – April 12
(No Class April 5 for Spring Break)

Description  This course will study the development of art, particularly painting, in the American colonies. We will consider the growing role of art and of individual artists and “art for art’s sake.” We will look at the important role the politics of the period played in the lives of the artists and the role art played in galvanizing public opinion in support of the revolution and in framing our historical narrative. The SGL will present historical and biographical material, and the class will examine and discuss the work of key artists of the period including Benjamin West, John Singleton Copley, Charles Willson Peale, John Trumbull, and Gilbert Stuart. Supplementary reports by class members and museum trips will be optional but encouraged.

Readings     There is no required reading; optional reading may be provided by the SGL.

Preparation Time    No more than 30 – 60 minutes per week. 

Biography   Miriam Goldman graduated from Brandeis with a major in comparative literature.  She is a retired educator, having taught high school English and creative writing for many years and then undergraduates and graduate students at Boston University School of Education.  She has had a long-term interest in art and art history, particularly American art, and the influence of the arts in society’s view of itself. She has taught several courses at BOLLI, including a Survey of Painting in the United States, and art history courses on The Armory Show at 100 and the Fauves.  She is an amateur painter.

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LIT11-10-Thur3 Moral Imagination: A Guide to the Complex

Leader  –  Michael Kaufman

Thursday – Course Period 3 – 2:10 pm to 3:35 pm

Description    We live in an age in which violence is so prevalent that it is possible that civilization might not survive.  This is the sentiment of a 16th century writer about the engulfing chaos, deceit, betrayal and brutality he saw flourishing around him. Such an environment, Michel de Montaigne contended, demanded a moral stand. The moral imagination is intended to imply our ability to distinguish competing claims of “rightness;” to recognize ethical challenges and what OUGHT to be done; to determine who is responsible to act or to refrain from acting. In earlier cultures story tellers served as moral teachers communicating acceptable standards and social rules that knit the clan, the tribe, the family together. Though we can no longer be so sure about universal laws of conduct, stories may still provide moral guidance. This discussion class will feature selected stories that present challenging moral dilemmas, conflicts that will challenge us to clarify our own value systems and exercise our moral reasoning.

Readings    The readings consist of 9 short stories that will be provided in an introductory letter well before the first class.

Preparation Time     3 hours a week

Biography   Michael Kaufman has a background in teaching in a variety of settings, and has been offering seminars at BOLLI for many years.

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SOC4-10-Thur3 Sex and Gender: The Liberation Movements of the Late 20th and Early 21st Centuries

Leader – Sarah Pearlman 

Thursday – Course Period 3 – 2:10 pm to 3:35 pm

Description     Bursting upon the American scene in the late 1960s and early 1970s were protests and demands by multiple groups including three new political movements. Women were demanding equality, the end of prescribed sex roles, and safety from violence. Gay men and drag queens fought off police at the Stonewall Inn, a popular New York City gay bar, protesting homosexual harassment. Lesbians stormed the stage at the Second Congress to Unite Women in New York City insisting that lesbianism be recognized as a valid choice of sexuality and life style. Transgender politics would come later. Focusing on these four liberation movements, this study group will address the emergence of heterosexual and lesbian feminism, gay male political activism, and the struggle for transgender rights. Included will be exploration of the origins of prohibitions and social rules on sex and gender, the schism between heterosexual and lesbian feminists, the impact of AIDS, the domestication of lesbian and gay male movements, and the many ways of being transgender. The course will continue with discussion of contemporary identities (sometimes called the “alphabet generation”) and conflicting relationships between identity groups, concluding with what these liberation movements have achieved and recent challenges under the guise of “religious freedom” by the current administration. The class format will be a combination of presentation and discussion and will include a documentary film and a guest speaker.

Readings   Please purchase or borrow The Gay Revolution: The Story of the Struggle by Lillian Federman (Simon & Schuster, 2015), a comprehensive history. We'll focus on selected chapters, about 120 pages, during the course. The SGL will distribute a packet of additional required readings at a cost of no more than $20.00.

Preparation Time     One - two book chapters or articles will be assigned for each class session, approximately 30-40 pages most weeks.

Biography  Sarah F. Pearlman was employed for many years in the Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology at the University of Hartford and is now Associate Professor Emeritus. She has taught at Antioch University, Lesley College, Northeastern University, and Suffolk University as well as adult learners at UMASS OLLI. Nationally recognized for her pioneering role in establishing a psychology of lesbians, Sarah was selected by the Society for the Psychological Study of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Issues (American Psychological Association) as the recipient of the 2011 Award for Distinguished Professional Contribution. She is currently active in Boston’s LGBT elder organizations.

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WRI3-5b-Thur3 “You Can’t Make This Stuff Up!” Crafting Dynamic Creative Nonfiction

Leader – Sue Wurster

Thursday – Course Period 3 – 2:10 pm to 3:35 pm
5 Week Course - April 19 - May 17

Description     According to Lee Gutkind, founder and editor of Creative Nonfiction magazine, creative nonfiction has become the most popular genre in our literary and publishing communities, and in the academic arena, it has become the most popular way to write.  So what is creative nonfiction?  Gutkind defines the genre simply as “true stories well told.” Genres of creative nonfiction writing include personal narratives, opinion or “op-ed” pieces, feature articles, travel writing, reviews, and more.  The goal is to make our nonfiction, true stories read like fiction, captivating and enthralling readers from start to finish.  After all, when it comes to our true stories, we all know that “you just can’t make this stuff up!” In this course, we will read creative nonfiction by a variety of writers and write our own.  Each week, we’ll focus on a different genre, writing and sharing a 500-word item with the group for response. Genres explored 5a will be different from those in 5b.

Readings   On Writing Well by William Zinsser, available as pdf from instructor 

Preparation Time     There will be a short reading assignment for each week (20 minutes or so) as well as a 500-word piece of writing (however long that takes to create).

Biography  Sue Wurster earned B.S./M.A. degrees in Communications from Ohio University, taught speech at St. Cloud State, writing at Elizabeth Seton College, drama at the Chapin and Calhoun schools, and English/Humanities at Nashoba Brooks School. She studied at Northwestern’s School of Speech, NYC’s New Actors’ Workshop, Bank Street College, and Columbia University.  She served as national chair of the high school division of the American Alliance for Theatre in Education, director of New York State’s Forensics League, and co-founding chair of the Massachusetts Middle School Speech League.  (She is often referred to as “Wurster, the Wily Word Woman.”)

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