Academic Calendar

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Course Catalog

This list contains course descriptions for all courses offered by the Politics Department. Refer to the Brandeis University Bulletin's "politics" section for the most up-to-date information on requirements for the major, minor and for course descriptions. 

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Courses of Instruction

Course Subgroupings
  • Introductory Courses (POL 10a through POL 15a)
  • American Politics (POL 14b and POL 101a through POL 126a)
  • Comparative Politics (POL 11b and POL 127a through POL 159a)
  • International Politics (POL 15a and POL 160a through POL 180b)
  • Political Theory and Methods (POL10a and POL 181b through POL 192b)
  • Seminars for Graduate Students (POL 211a through POL 216b)
  • Supervised Study for Graduate Students (POL 302a and above)
(1-99) Primarily for Undergraduate Students

POL 10a Introduction to Political Theory 
[ ss ] 
Open to first-year students.
Examination of classical political texts and modern writings for insights on central problems of political discourse, such as power and authority, human nature, freedom, obligation, justice, and the organization of the state. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Yack or Mr. Lenowitz

POL 11b Introduction to Comparative Politics 
[ ss ] 
Open to first-year students.
Introduces key concepts and questions in comparative politics and seeks to provide students with a grounding in the basic tools of comparative analysis. It applies and evaluates competing theoretical approaches (cultural, institutional, social-structural, and leadership-centered) to explain several important phenomena such as (1) democracy and democratization; (2) revolution; and (3) ethnicity and ethnic conflict. It also explores recent debates about the importance of civil society and political institutions in shaping political outcomes. Cases will be drawn from Africa, Asia, Western Europe, the Americas, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East.. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Bellin

POL 14b Introduction to American Government 
[ ss ] 
Open to first-year students.
Analysis of American political institutions: Congress, the presidency, Supreme Court, bureaucracy, political parties, pressure groups, and problems of governmental decision making in relation to specific areas of public policy. Usually offered every semester.
Ms. Greenlee or Mr. Woll

POL 15a Introduction to International Relations 
[ ss ] 
Open to first-year students.
General introduction to international politics, emphasizing the essential characteristics of the international system as a basis for understanding the foreign policy of individual countries. Analysis of causes of war, conditions of peace, patterns of influence, the nature of the world's political economy, global environmental issues, human rights, and prospects for international organizations. Open to first-year students. Usually offered every semester.
Mr. Art or Mr. Chase

POL 79b War and World History 
[ ss ] 
Examines the subject of war in world history. We will explore answers to the following questions: why do wars, especially major wars, start? How has war affected the course of world history? How different, and how similar, does war look across the centuries? How has technological innovation influenced the conduct of war and the evolution of societies? Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Art

POL 92bj Internship 
Offered as part of JBS program.
Staff

POL 98a Independent Study 
Tutorial study on specialized topics, outside the regular curricular offerings of the departments, on interest to students and appropriate politics faculty person. Requires agreement between student and supervising faculty member on the specific topic and syllabus of readings and assignments for the tutorial, including written work required for the course (normally the equivalent of a term research paper). Students may count up to two such courses toward completion of the major. Usually offered every year.
Staff

POL 98aj Independent Study 
Tutorial study on specialized topics, outside the regular curricular offerings of the departments, on interest to students and appropriate politics faculty person. Requires agreement between student and supervising faculty member on the specific topic and syllabus of readings and assignments for the tutorial, including written work required for the course (normally the equivalent of a term research paper). Students may count up to two such courses toward completion of the major. Offered as part of JBS program.
Staff

POL 98b Independent Study 
See POL 98a. Usually offered every year.
Staff

POL 99a Senior Research: Honors Thesis 
Students will consult with the head of the politics honors program before being assigned to a professor for the supervision of their theses and will participate in a biweekly colloquium. Usually offered every year.
Staff

POL 99b Senior Research: Honors Thesis 
Students will consult with the head of the politics honors program before being assigned to a professor for the supervision of their theses and will participate in a biweekly colloquium. Usually offered every year.
Staff

POL 99d Senior Research: Honors Thesis 
Students will consult with the head of the politics honors program before being assigned to a professor for the supervision of their theses and will participate in a biweekly colloquium. Usually offered every year.
Staff

(100-199) For Both Undergraduate and Graduate Students

POL 100b Political Science Methods: Research, Design, and Modes of Analysis 
qr ss 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
An introduction to nonstatistical research methods for analyzing political processes. Moves from selecting problems to composing a focused research question, examining relevant theory, conceptualizing variables, generating hypotheses, research design, research operations, and analysis. Uses examples from comparative, international, and American politics. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Kryder

POL 103b Seminar: Political Leadership 
ss 
Examines political leadership through biographies, autobiographies, and biographical fiction. These are used to help us understand and compare different modes of political leadership, including the "apolitical-rationalist" (McGeorge Bundy), "political" (Lincoln, Johnson, Truman), and the ostensibly "non-political expert" (Robert Moses). Usually offered every year.
Mr. Levin

POL 105a Elections in America 
ss 
Examines modern campaigns and elections to the United States presidency and Congress. Topics include the influence of partisanship, policy differences, and candidate images on the vote; the impact of money on campaigns; the role of the mass media; and the differences among presidential, Senate, and House elections. Usually offered every third year.
Staff

POL 108aj The Police and Social Movements in American Politics 
ss 
Analyses American mass political movements, their interaction with police, and their influences on American politics. Topics include the relationship between social movements and various political institutions. Explore various theories with case studies of specific political movements. Offered as part of JBS program.
Mr. Kryder

POL 111a The American Congress 
ss 
The structure and behavior of the Congress. Emphasis on the way member incentives for reelection, power on Capitol Hill, and good public policy shape Congress. Usually offered every second year.
Staff

POL 112b Democracy in America 
ss 
Examines how political culture, theory, institutions, and processes define democracy in America beginning with eighteenth century constitutional framework. Also looks at the development of constitutional limits and prescriptions. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Woll

POL 113b The American Presidency 
ss 
Philosophical and historical origins of the presidency, examining the constitutional role of the chief executive. Historical development of the presidency, particularly the emergence of the modern presidency during the twentieth century. Contemporary relationships between the presidency and the electorate, as well as the other branches of government. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Kryder

POL 115a Constitutional Law 
ss 
Analysis of core principles of constitutional law as formulated by the Supreme Court. Primary focus on the First Amendment, the equal protection and due process clauses, federalism, the commerce clause, and the separation of powers. Emphasis also on the moral values and political theories that form our constitutional system. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Woll

POL 115b Seminar: Constitutional Law and Theory 
ss 
Advanced research seminar on selected issues of constitutional law. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Woll

POL 117a Administrative Law 
ss 
The role of administrative agencies in lawmaking and adjudication. Emphasis on the problem of defining and protecting the public interest, as well as the rights of individuals and groups directly involved in administrative proceedings. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Woll

POL 120b The Politics of Policymaking 
ss 
Examines the connection between politics and policymaking to identify the political determinants of public policy since the 1970’s. By paying close attention to what policy makers say about what they are doing, the course connects the world of ideas to the world of actions. The course examines concrete cases from specific time periods across a wide range of policy areas such as health care, tax policy, Social Security, education reform, immigration, tort reform,and deregulation. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Levin

POL 121b Political Partisanship, Policymaking and Coalition Building 
ss 
Focuses on "getting past no" through analyses of successful and failed attempts to build coalitions - that critical connection between politics and policymaking. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Levin

POL 122b Seminar: Policy Analysis and Policy Implementation 
ss 
Development of a framework for policy analysis that integrates economic tools and political science thinking. Application of this "political economy" approach to several problems and cases. Usually offered every second year.
Staff

POL 123a Political Psychology 
ss 
Course open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.
Explores public opinion, political socialization, and political behavior through the lens of psychology. Applying psychological theory to traditional topics in political science is emphasized. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Greenlee

POL 124a The Politics of the Civil Rights Movement in the U.S. 
ss 
Focuses on the political causes and consequences of the American Civil Rights Movement. Usually offered every second year.
Staff

POL 124b Race, Inequality, and Social Policy 
ss 
Explores the causes and consequences of economic, social, and political inequality in the United States. Examines trends from the perspective of both liberal and conservative social scientists. Asks what forms of inequality matter and what should be done about them. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Mapps

POL 125a Women in American Politics 
ss 
Addresses three major dimensions of women's political participation: social reform and women-identified issues; women's organizations and institutions; and women politicians, electoral politics, and party identification. Covers historical context and contemporary developments in women's political activity. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Greenlee

POL 127b Seminar: Managing Ethnic Conflict 
ss wi 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
Comparative study of the sources and character of interethnic conflict, with emphasis on the processes by which groups become politicized, and the strategies and techniques for managing conflict in a democratic system. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Burg

POL 128a The Politics of Revolution: State Violence and Popular Insurgency in the Third World 
nw ss 
Introduction to twentieth-century revolutionary movements in the Third World, focusing on the emergence of peasant-based resistance and revolution in the world beyond the West, and on the role of state violence in provoking popular involvement in protest, rebellion, and insurgency. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Thaxton

POL 129a East European Politics 
ss 
Politics and society in the post-Communist states of Eastern Europe, drawing general lessons about the relationships among social modernization, nationalism, and democratic transition. Usually offered every fourth year. 
Mr. Burg

POL 131b Social Movements in Latin America 
ss 
Origins, dynamics, and social and cultural impact of movements among indigenous groups, women, peasants, and blacks in Latin America since the 1980s. Comparative study of other social movements in Latin America and elsewhere in the world. Usually offered every year.
Staff

POL 132a Religion, Nationalism, and Violence in Comparative Perspective 
ss 
Examines the phenomenon of religious nationalism in South Asia with focus on violent conflict in Sri Lanka, India, and Pakistan. Theoretical analysis of the nature of religious mobilization, the politics of holy space, and the logic of religious violence. Special one-time offering, spring 2014.
Mr. Isaacs

POL 133a Contemporary Politics in the Middle East 
nw ss 
Examines the Western impact on the Middle East state system, and the key challenges to the stability of these states and to the regional order. Topics include Arab nationalism; religion and minorities, the Arab-Israeli conflict and other issues. Usually offered every third year.
Ms. Bellin

POL 134b Immigration, State, and Nation 
ss wi 
Looks at immigration from the perspectives of policy-makers, migrants, and the groups affected by immigration in sender nations as well as destination countries. Introduces students to the history of migration policy, core concepts and facts about migration in the West, and to the theories and disagreements among immigrant scholars. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Klausen

POL 135b The Politics of Islamic Resurgence 
nw ss 
Studies the impact of Islamic resurgence on both international and intra-national politics. It explores the competing explanations for Islamic resurgence (cultural, economic, and political), Islamic movements in comparative perspective (with special emphasis on the cases of Egypt, Iran, Lebanon, Britain and France), the successes and failures of Islamic revolution, the ideological content of Islamic revival (and debates over the potential conflict with Western notions of democracy and gender equality). Islamic notions of jihad, terror in the name of Islam, the politics of cultural change, and Islam as a supranational movement. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Bellin

POL 138b Israeli Politics In Comparative Perspective 
ss 
Introduces students to the Israeli political system through a comparative lens. We will discuss various issues, such as political and socioeconomic development, cultural diversity, and ethnic conflict, as well as how they are manifested in Israeli democracy. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Abu

POL 142a U.S.-Israeli Relations: Interests, Values, Lobbies, and the "Special Relationship" 
ss 
This course subjects the U.S.-Israeli relationship to theoretically-informed, and historically-grounded critical evaluation. It examines strategic interests, cultural factors, and the activities of domestic and foreign lobbies. Usually offered every year.
Staff

POL 143b Israel, Iran, the Bomb and Beyond: Nuclear Proliferation in the Middle East 
ss 
Addresses one of the most pressing international issues - the nuclearization of Iran. It takes a broad approach that analyzes this issue in context of nuclear proliferation in the Middle East, the regional balance of power, and overall international stability. Concludes with a United Nations negotiations simulation, in which the students apply their theoretical and historical knowledge in order to propose different policy options. Special two-time offering, spring 2011 and spring 2012.
Ms. Ben-Josef Hirsch

POL 144a Latin American Politics I 
nw ss 
Revolution, order, and regime transition in northern Latin America. Specific examination of the Mexican and Cuban revolutions and their outcomes. POL 144a is independent of POL 144b. Usually offered every year. 
Mr. Hindley

POL 144b Latin American Politics II 
nw ss 
Emphasis on elite control, the military, the political role of populist politics, and the uncertain process of democratization. Brazil and Argentina are examined specifically. POL 144b is independent of POL 144a. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Hindley

POL 145b Muslims in the West: Politics, Religion, and Law 
ss 
Few issues have caused more public furor than the accommodation of Islam in Europe and the United States. It is often overlooked that Muslims are developing the institutions of their faith in societies that offer everyone the freedom of choice and expression. This seminar looks at religious discrimination as a barrier to the civic and political inclusion of Muslim immigrants, the responses of governments, courts, and the general public, and what we know about the balance among "fundamentalist, " "moderate," and "progressive" Muslim viewpoints. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Klausen

POL 146b Seminar: Topics in Revolutions in the Third World 
nw ss 
May be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor.
Explores revolutionary situations, revolutionary movements (successful and unsuccessful), and revolutionary regimes in the Third World since World War II. Specific topics may vary from year to year. Usually offered every year. 
Mr. Hindley

POL 147a The Government and Politics of China 
nw ss 
Introduction to major themes of Chinese politics, emphasizing the rise of the Chinese Communists and the post-1949 trends in domestic politics, while also surveying historical, sociological, and cultural influences in Chinese politics. Attention to the nature of the traditional state, impact of colonialism, national revolution, and the course of contemporary state development. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Thaxton

POL 147b Seminar: The Modern Chinese Revolution 
nw ss 
In-depth exploration of origins, processes, and consequences of the modern Chinese revolution, focusing specifically on Western social science theories and interpretations of the revolution. It also provides comprehensive and comparative perspective on revolution in twentieth-century China and revolutionary movements in other parts of the globe. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Thaxton

POL 148a Seminar: Contemporary Chinese Politics 
nw ss 
A broad and in-depth understanding of key issues in contemporary Chinese politics--China after 1949. Emphasis on the role of the state in promoting economic development, social betterment, political stability, and justice. Special attention to the Tiananmen Protest Movement of 1989. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Thaxton

POL 150a Politics of Southeast Asia 
nw ss 
Introduction to the politics of modern Southeast Asia, with the focus on the indigenous peoples and their cultures, societies, and histories. The greatly changed and changing political systems of Indonesia and Thailand are examined individually in some depth. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Hindley

POL 151a Seminar: Cultural Pluralism and Democratic Governance 
ss wi 
Prerequisites: Sophomore or junior class standing and at least two prior politics courses.
How liberal democracies respond to the social and political challenges of linguistic, cultural, religious, racial, and gender differences. Examines legal, political, and normative issues arising out of these differences, and the implications of various responses for the stability of a liberal democratic state. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Burg

POL 154a Seminar: Citizenship 
ss 
Liberal theory presumes the progress of history to be, in the words of John Stuart Mill, a gradual "doing away with privilege." Examines the frontiers of social and political justice through readings drawn from literature, political science, and history. Usually offered every third year. 
Ms. Klausen

POL 154aj Seminar: Citizenship 
ss 
Liberal theory presumes the progress of history to be, in the words of John Stuart Mill, a gradual "doing away with privilege." Examines the frontiers of social and political justice through readings drawn from literature, political science, and history. Offered as part of JBS program.
Mr. Kryder

POL 156b European Culture & Politics 
ss wi 
The comparative politics of Western Europe. Focuses on the development of political parties and social movements in Britain, France, and Germany--particularly since 1945--to determine how they affect policies and the citizenry's participation in modern democracies. Usually offered every third year.
Ms. Klausen

POL 160a The War on Global Terrorism 
ss 
Intended for juniors and seniors, but open to all students. 
Explores how 9/11 changed our lives. The course surveys the build-up of Al Queda leading up to the 9/11 attacks and ten years of counter terrorism. Students are given an introduction to Jihadist doctrines and Al Queda's structure, as well as theories about the cause of terrorism. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Klausen

POL 164a Conflict and Peacemaking in the Middle East 
ss 
Evolution of the Arab-Israeli conflict and the efforts to resolve it. Focuses on key documents and developments with particular emphasis on the Palestinian-Israeli dimension, and the different narratives adopted by the parties on the conflict. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Feldman

POL 166b Seminar: The Middle East in International Relations 
ss 
Prerequisite: POL 15a or equivalent.
Explores how the concepts, theories, and paradigms from the field of International Relations can be used to understand the politics of the Middle East. usually offered every second year.
Mr. Feldman

POL 167a United States and China in World Politics 
ss 
Issues in U.S.-China relations, including Taiwan and Tibet, the formation of a Greater China, military security and use of nuclear weapons, human rights, Chinese and American versions of nationalism and internationalism, and others. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Thaxton

POL 168b American Foreign Policy 
ss 
Overview of America's foreign policy since 1945. Topics include the Cold War era, the economic competitiveness of the United States, the role of the United States in selected world regions, the role of human rights in U.S. foreign policy, the U.S. participation in the United Nations, post-Cold War foreign policy, and the making and implementing of foreign policy. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Art

POL 171b National Intelligence: Theory, Practice, and Cinematic 
ss 
Examines the challenges of developing useful "intelligence" for policymaking, the nature of covert operations for intelligence, and how spy/espionage films shape popular understanding of intelligence and covert operations. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Burg

POL 172b Seminar: International Political Economy 
ss 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
The politics and modern evolution of international economic relations, comprising trade, money, multinational productions, and development. Also the role of states and transnational actors in international markets and the global differentiation of power, and distribution of wealth. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Chase

POL 173a U.S. Foreign Economic Policy 
oc ss wi 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above.
Presents the history and politics of the foreign economic policy in the United States. Emphasis is on political and economic considerations that influence the domestic actors and institutions involved in the formulation of policy. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Chase

POL 174b Seminar: Problems of National Security 
ss 
Analysis of the role and utility of military power in international politics. Selected case studies from the last fifty years. Selected topics on post-Cold War military issues, including the spread of weapons of mass destruction, collective approaches to coercion, and the role of U.S. military power in world stability. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Art

POL 175b Global Civil Society 
ss 
The role of international organizations in the contemporary global political and economic system, the ways in which they influence or contribute to major international policy issues, and the interactions between international organizations and global civil society. Usually offered every year.
Staff

POL 179a China's Global Rise: The Challenge to Democratic Order 
ss 
Explores the implications of China's global rise for the global democratic order constructed by the United States in the aftermath of World War II. Among other issues, we will ask whether China's international strategy in Asia, Africa, and Latin America poses a serious challenge to democratic nations and their support for democratization. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Thaxton

POL 180b Sustaining Development 
nw ss 
Prerequisite: Some familiarity with development issues. 
Explores different institutionalized approaches to development. Examines how institutions affect development in selected geographic areas, at levels ranging from local to national and international. Considers why similar policies when implemented in different ways may lead to quite distinct outcomes. Usually offered every third year.
Staff

POL 182a Liberal Political Thought 
ss 
An exploration of the history of liberal thought as well as contemporary critics and defenders of liberalism, focusing primarily on American and European authors. Authors may include Locke, Smith, Montesquieu, Mill, Tocqueville, Dewey, Rawls, Hayek, Shklar, MacIntyre, Oakeshott, Sandel, Walzer, and Okin. Usually offered every fourth year.
Staff

POL 187b Conservative Political Thought 
ss 
Focuses on American and European thinkers, with an emphasis on critics of equality and unlimited commercial and civil liberty. Readings include political philosophy and literature. Authors may include Burke, Oakeshott, Calhoun, Conrad, Hayek, Macintyre, and Strauss. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Yack

POL 189a Marx, Nietzsche, and Twentieth-Century Radicalism 
ss 
Comparison of two powerful and influential critiques of modern politics and society. Explanation of Marx's work, both for its own insights and as a model for radical theorists; and of Nietzsche's work as an alternative conception of radical social criticism. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Yack

POL 190b Seminar: Democratic Theory 
ss 
Explores in depth the nature, virtues, and limitations of democracy as a way of organizing political affairs. Brings together classic texts, for example, Rousseau's Social Contract, with more recent topical readings on topics like democracy and nationalism. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Yack

POL 191a Seminar: Punishment and Crime 
ss 
Examines theories justifying criminal punishment, and the practice of law enforcement, as a means of understanding our society and its values. Topics may include hate crimes, the law of self-defense, rape and others. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Lawrence

POL 192b Seminar: Topics in Law and Political Theory 
ss 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. May be repeated for credit if taught by different instructors.
Interplay among law, morality, and political theory. Specific topics vary from year to year. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Yack or Mr. Lenowitz

POL 194a Politics and the Novel 
ss 
Selected works of fiction as sources of political ideas and pictures of political and social life. How modern fiction helps us understand social change, societies in transition and decay, revolution, law, bureaucracy, and ethnicity. Authors such as Kafka, Conrad, Borges, Dostoevsky, Ford Madox Ford, Babel, Greene, Malraux, and Carpenter. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Levin

POL 195b Shakespeare and the Politics of Leadership 
ss 
Shakespeare as sources for understanding selected work of the role of leaders and followers, elites and masses, class and ethnicity, social change, the relations between disparate social orders, and societies ins transition. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Levin

(200 and above) Primarily for Graduate Students

POL 211a Graduate Seminar: Political Theory 
Core course in political theory, required of all Politics Ph.D. students.
Explores a few themes, such as justice, freedom, and community, by means of careful reading of a selection of classical and contemporary texts. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Yack

POL 212a Graduate Seminar: Research Methods and Methodology 
Familiarizes students with the major research techniques of a qualitative nature for political science and addresses central issues in the logic of inquiry in social science. Issues and techniques include the case study method, the comparative method, counterfactual, and research design. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Kryder

POL 213a Graduate Seminar: Comparative Political Institutions and Public Policy 
Studies the ideas and institutions of representative democracy from a comparative perspective. Topics include parties and party systems, variations in constitutional government from presidentialism to parliamentarianism, the process and prerequisites of democratization, and the comparative politics of the welfare state. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Burg, Ms. Klausen, or Ms. Bellin

POL 213b Graduate Seminar: Selected Topics in Comparative Politics 
Provides graduate students an opportunity to engage in research and discussion of selected issues in comparative politics. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Burg or Ms. Klausen or Ms. Bellin

POL 214a Graduate Seminar: International Relations 
Examines the international relations of national political systems. Topics include the impact of evolving international institutions and norms on the course of world politics; the effects of security, economic, and environmental factors; and the interaction between domestic politics and foreign policy. Special attention is given to American foreign policy and the changing place of the United States in world politics. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Art

POL 214b Graduate Seminar: Selected Topics in World Politics 
Provides graduate students an opportunity to engage in research and discussion of selected issues in the international dimensions of world politics. Each term it deals with a different topic in greater depth than is possible in the context of the program's field seminar in this area. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Art or Mr. Chase

POL 215a Graduate Seminar: American Political Development 
Examines the creation and evolution of national institutions in the United States. Themes include the influence of ideas on institutional development; the influence of institutional arrangements on conflicts and policies; and the changing nature of ideas and institutions, especially in such pivotal periods as the founding, the Civil War, the progressive era, the New Deal, and the 1960s and 1970s. Usually offered every second year. 
Mr. Kryder or Mr. Mapps

POL 215b Graduate Seminar: Advanced Topics in American Politics 
Provides graduate students an opportunity to engage in research and discussion of selected issues in American politics. Each term the seminar deals with a different topic in greater depth than is possible in the context of the program's field seminar in this area. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Greenlee, Mr. Kryder, or Mr. Mapps

POL 216b Seminar: Advanced Topics in Political Theory 
Provides graduate students an opportunity to engage in research and discussion of selected issues in political theory. Each term it deals with a different topic in greater depth than is possible in the context of the program's field seminar in this area. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Yack or Staff

POL 298a Independent Study 
Staff

POL 302a Readings in Politics 
Specific sections for individual faculty members as requested.
Offered every year.
Staff

POL 302b Readings in Politics 
Usually offered every year.
Staff

POL 340d Proseminar 
Required of all PhD and MA students. Not for credit.
Year-long course that meets biweekly. Focuses on professional development, including teaching competency. Offered every year.
Staff

POL 350a Master's Thesis 
Master's thesis research and preparation. Usually offered every year.
Staff

POL 350b Master's Thesis 
Usually offered every year.
Staff

POL 400d Dissertation Research 
Independent research for the PhD degree. Specific sections for individual faculty members as requested.
Staff

Cross-Listed in Politics: American Politics

AAAS 82a Urban Politics 
ss 
This is an experiential learning course. 
Examines urban politics in the United States from the early twentieth century to the present. Topics include urban political machines; minority political participation; the evolution of American suburbs; and racial, economic, and political inequities that challenge public policymaking. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Mapps

AAAS 114b Race, Ethnicity, and Electoral Politics in the United States 
ss 
Explores the role that racial and ethnic politics play in American political campaigns and elections. Readings provide historical, theoretical, and empirical overviews of racial and ethnic politics in four contexts: political parties, presidential elections, congressional campaigns, and state legislative contests. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Mapps

HIST 160b American Legal History II 
ss 
Survey of American legal development from 1865 to the present. Major topics include constitutionalism and racial inequality, the legal response to industrialization, progressivism and the transformation of liberalism, the rise of the administrative state, and rights-based movements for social justice. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Willrich

HS 104b American Health Care 
ss 
Examines and critically analyzes the United States health care system, emphasizing the major trends and issues that have led to the current sense of "crisis." In addition to providing a historical perspective, this course will establish a context for analyzing the current, varied approaches to health care reform. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Altman

HS 110a Wealth and Poverty 
ss 
Examines why the gap between richer and poorer citizens appears to be widening in the United States and elsewhere, what could be done to reverse this trend, and how the widening disparity affects major issues of public policy. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Shapiro

Cross-Listed in Politics: Comparative Politics

AAAS 175a Comparative Politics of North Africa 
nw ss 
Explores the formation and development of political cleavages and cleavage systems, and of mass-based political groups, analyzing the expansion of mass political participation, elections, the impact of the military on political groups, and international factors. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Nyangoni

HIST 172a 20th Century Social Movements in the Americas 
ss 
Examines social movements in Latin America in the 20th and 21st centuries, covering feminism, labor activism, ethnic mobilization, peasant rebellion, environmental defense, resistance to dictatorship, anti-imperialism, and related topics. Usually offered every second year.
Staff

HS 219f Transitional Justice: Introduction 
Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit. 
Transitional justice is a relatively new and growing interdisciplinary field of study placed at the intersection between international law and justice, politics, human rights and conflict and peace studies. This module introduces the concept and practices of transitional justice. We review the various mechanisms of transitional justice, including: criminal prosecution; purges and lustrations; truth and reconciliation commissions; reparations and compensation schemes; revisions of national-historical narratives; official apologies; and, public commemoration. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Hirsch

HS 258f Transitional Justice: The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict in Comparative Perspective 
Prerequisite: HS 219f or the permission of the instructor. Meets for one-half semester and yields half-course credit.
Explores the applicability of the transitional justice framework and its different practices to historical and current aspects of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. We will consider how developments in international law such as the International Human Rights Regime and the ICC affect the dynamic of the conflict. Drawing on other cases of international conflict (Northern Ireland, Indonesia/ East Timor) we will evaluate which, if any, of the transitional justice practices may advance or hinder an Israeli-Palestinian negotiation process and how useful might they be for longer-term peacebuilding and reconciliation. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Hirsch

NEJS 185b The Making of the Modern Middle East 
hum nw ss wi 
Open to all students. 
Discusses the processes that led to the emergence of the modern Middle East: disintegration of Islamic society, European colonialism, reform and reaction, and the rise of nationalism and the modern states. Usually offered every second year.
Staff

SOC 155b Protest, Politics, and Change: Social Movements 
ss 
Utilizes case studies of actual movements to examine a variety of approaches to contentious politics. Covers collective behavior, resource mobilization, rational choice, and newer interactive models. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Cunningham

Cross-Listed in Politics: International Relations

AAAS 163b Africa in World Politics 
nw ss 
Explores the impact of African states in world affairs; the African and Afro-Asian groups in the United Nations; relations with Eastern Europe, Western Europe, and the Americas; the Afro-Asian movement; nonalignment; the Organization of African Unity; and Pan-Africanism. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Nyangoni

IGS/LGLS 180a The Spirit of International Law 
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Course to be taught at Brandeis program in The Hague.
This course provides a broad survey of international law--how it aspires to peace, justice, and human rights; and how it meets the hard realities of a complex world. Building on direct contact with international tribunals, the course considers social, cultural, political, and economic factors shaping global justice, along with the impact of legal values on nations, regions, and communities. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Gaskins

LGLS 125b International Law and Organizations 
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Introduction to international law, its nature, sources, and application, for example, its role in the management of international conflicts. Topics may include international agreements, international organizations including the United Nations and the International Court of Justice, states and recognition, nationality and alien rights, territorial and maritime jurisdiction, international claims, and the laws of war and human rights. Usually offered every second year.
Staff

NEJS 189a The Arab-Israeli Conflict 
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Consideration of Arab-Jewish relations, attitudes, and interactions from 1880 to the present. Emphasis on social factors and intellectual currents and their impact on politics. Examines the conflict within its international setting. Usually offered every third year. 
Staff

Cross-Listed in Politics: Political Theory

FREN 111a The Republic 
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Prerequisite: FREN 106b or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. 
The "Republic" analyzes how the republican ideal of the citizen devoid of religious, ethnic, or gender identity has fared in different Francophone political milieux. Course involves understanding how political institutions such as constitutions, parliaments, and court systems interact with reality of modern societies in which religious, ethnic, and gender identities play important roles. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Randall

HIST 181b Red Flags/Black Flags: Marxism vs. Anarchism, 1845-1968 
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From Marx's first major book in 1845 to the French upheavals of 1968, the history of left-wing politics and ideas. The struggles between Marxist orthodoxy and anarchist-inspired, left Marxist alternatives. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Hulliung

HIST 183b Community and Alienation: Social Theory from Hegel to Freud 
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The rise of social theory understood as a response to the trauma of industrialization. Topics include Marx's concept of "alienation," Tönnies's distinction between "community" and "society," Durkheim's notion of "anomie," Weber's account of "disenchantment," and Nietzsche's repudiation of modernity. Usually offered every fourth year.
Mr. Hulliung

HIST 192b Romantic and Existentialist Political Thought 
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Readings from Camus, Sartre, Beckett, and others. Examination and criticism of romantic and existentialist theories of politics. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Hulliung

HIST 195b American Political Thought: From the Gilded Age through the New Deal 
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Topics include the Mugwumps, Populists, Progressives; Teddy Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson; the New Nationalism and the New Freedom; the continuities and discontinuities of the New Deal and the Progressive Era. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Hulliung

PHIL 111a What Is Justice? 
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Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or political theory or permission of the instructor. 
What is justice and what does justice require? The course examines theories of justice, both classical and contemporary. Topics include liberty and equality, "who gets what and how much," welfare- and resource-based principles of justice, justice as a virtue, liberalism, multiculturalism, and globalization. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Smiley

PHIL 112a Philosophy of the State 
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Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or POL 10a strongly recommended.
Explores a variety of normative arguments for and against the legitimacy of the state that have been put forward by key figures in the history of western political philosophy; e.g. Hobbes, Kant, Rousseau, Hume, and Dewey. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Smiley

PHIL 116a Topics in Political Philosophy 
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Prerequisite: PHIL 1a, PHIL 17a, or POL 10a.
Explores social contract theories of political obligation, the right to rebel against the state, and the possibility of a global political community. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Smiley

PHIL 118a War and Morality 
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Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or POL 10a.
Explores a variety of moral questions associated with both war in general and particular kinds of warfare. How, if at all, does war differ from murder? Under what conditions can a particular war be justified? Where do we draw the line between defensive and offensive actions? Can a just war be restricted morally with respect to its tactics? Is torture ever justified? What is the moral status of "innocents" in arguments about the justifiability of particular modes of warfare? What, if anything, is special about terrorism? How--according to what principles--can we ascribe responsibility for harm in wartime? Does collective responsibility for war crimes make sense? Is pacifism a coherent doctrine? a justifiable practice? Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Smiley

PHIL 124a Philosophy of Revolution 
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A philosophical analysis of political revolution. Questions include: What are the causes of revolution? When is revolution justified? What is the value of freedom? What are the effects of revolution? Includes analysis of an example of revolution in history. Usually offered every third year.
Ms. Moran

Additional Cross-Listed Courses in Politics

AMST 185b The Culture of the Cold War 
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Addresses American political culture from the end of World War II until the revival of liberal movements and radical criticism. Focuses on the specter of totalitarianism, the "end of ideology," McCarthyism, the crisis of civil liberties, and the strains on the pluralistic consensus in an era of anti-Communism. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Whitfield

HIST 160a American Legal History I 
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Surveys American legal development from colonial settlement to the Civil War. Major issues include law as an instrument of revolution, capitalism and contract, invention of the police, family law, slavery law, and the Civil War as a constitutional crisis. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Willrich

IGS/LGLS 128b Networks of Global Justice 
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Course to be taught at Brandeis program in The Hague.
Examines how global justice is actively shaped by dynamic institutions, contested ideas, and evolving cultures. Using liberal arts methods, the course explores prospects for advancing peace and justice in a complex world. For a laboratory it accesses courts, tribunals, rights initiatives, and research projects found in The Hague—a global hub for some of the world’s most intractable conflicts. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Gaskins

SOC 123b The Welfare State and Nonprofit America 
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The basic programs of the "welfare state" are being challenged everywhere. Can societies such as ours support extensive public pension programs, health care, and income support for the poor and unemployed? This fundamental question is discussed with reference to contemporary American society. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Sirianni