Title

Associate Professor of Politics

Degree

Ph.D., New School for Social Research

Field of Specialty

American political development; qualitative methods; policing and social movements; history of race policy and politics; policing.

Contact Information

Olin-Sang American Civilization Center 107
781-736-2778
kryder@brandeis.edu

Daniel Thomas Kryder

Current scholarship concerns the relationship between police and democracy in American history; temporal configurations in the American constitution, the causes and consequences of law enforcement patterns in the US South; and qualitative and historical methods.

Publications

Kryder, Daniel Thomas. Police and Social Protest in Modern America. Cambridge University Press, 2013. (forthcoming)

Kryder, Daniel Thomas. "Claims without Capacity: Surveillance and Policing Institutions and Executive Authority in Wartime." The Politics of Peace and the Consequences of War, University of Texas at Austin. May 6-7, 2007. (forthcoming)

Kryder, Daniel Thomas and Sarah Staszak. "Constitution as Clockwork: the Temporal Foundations of American Politics." Western Political Science Association, Las Vegas, Nevada. March 9, 2007.

Kryder, Daniel Thomas. "Black and White Police in the 20th Century U.S.: Democratization and Policing in American Political Development." Democratization in America. Ed. King, Desmond et. al.. John Hopkins University Press, 2005

Kryder, Daniel Thomas. "Entrepreneurs Reinforcing Order: Police Response to Protest and Crime in Washington, D.C. in the Twentieth Century." Political Action and Political Change: Leaders, Entrepreneurs and Agents in American Political Development. Ed. Skowronek, Stephen. University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005

Kryder, Daniel Thomas. Divided Arsenal: Race and the American State During World War II. Cambridge University Press, 2000.

Courses Taught

GSAS 301d Interdisciplinary Prospectus Seminar
POL 108aj The Police and Social Movements in American Politics
POL 113b The American Presidency
POL 124a The Politics of the Civil Rights Movement in the U.S.
POL 154aj Seminar: Citizenship
POL 192b Seminar: Topics in Law and Political Theory
POL 197a The Supreme Court Colloquium
POL 212a Graduate Seminar: Research Methods and Methodology
POL 215a Graduate Seminar: American Political Development
POL 215b Graduate Seminar: Advanced Topics in American Politics
POL 340d Proseminar
SYS 1c How Do We Know What We Know?