'DEIS Impact! asks...

l
  • How should we balance urgent individual needs with the need for systemic global change?
  • Despite good intentions, are efforts to help overseas actually fueling local conflicts or otherwise making problems worse?
  • Am I better off working locally, where I can think through foreseen and unforeseen impact? Or is that level of change simply too small-scale to be worthwhile?
  • How should I choose my commitments to causes? Is money enough? Is money a problem?

Explore related questions with the Ethical Inquiry "How Should I Choose My Commitments to Causes?" researched and written by Leah Igdalsky '14.

'DEIS Impact 2012


February 5–10, 2012
Brandeis University

(Click here for the 'DEIS Impact homepage)

t a
should i work locally....                                    ...or globally?

 
What if clubs and professors from all around campus came together to examine what "social justice" really means from a variety of perspectives, and to celebrate the ways Brandeis contributes to making the world better?

A unique collaboration between the Brandeis Undergraduate Student Union and the International Center for Ethics, Justice and Public Life, 'DEIS Impact (short for BranDEIS) was held Feb. 5-10, 2012. Close to a thousand students took part in the 27 events planned by 28 different academic departments and student clubs in this first "festival of social justice" at Brandeis. Topics ranged from global health to climate change to the meaning of social justice in ancient texts. Talks, performances, exhibits, videos, workshops, discussions, a family read-in, and a vigil all came together to make this week an exciting milestone in the history of Brandeis University's commitment to social justice.

Click here for a summary of the week's events.

rKeynote -- Local is Global: Bridging Domestic Action and Global Impact
Ruth Messinger, President, American Jewish World Service

Wednesday, February 8, 2012
7:00 p.m.
Sherman Function Hall, Hassenfeld Conference Center

For 25 years, American Jewish World Service (AJWS) has worked to empower marginalized people around the world. But with problems so vast, it can be hard to imagine how individuals can help. AJWS President Ruth Messinger led a dynamic discussion about how AJWS approaches development abroad and at home. From far-flung grassroots NGOs working in the field, to Jewish advocates for food justice lobbying on Capitol Hill, she described the transformative impact of education, volunteering and advocacy, and proposed new ways you can support movements for change around the world.

Special guest Professor Laurence Simon, co-founder of AJWS and executive director, Sustainable International Development Programs at Brandeis University’s Heller School, reflected on his vision at the creation of AJWS and on the remarkable 25-year history of the organization he helped launch.

To see the full video of the keynote and discussion scroll to the bottom of this page.


The Justice gave Ruth Messinger's keynote front-page coverage. Read the article here. The Hoot article is here.

Hear Messinger's two-minute observations about Judaism and social justice. Visit our Facebook page for more information about Ruth Messinger's keynote.


'DEIS Impact! was made possible in part by the generous support of The Louis D. Brandeis Legacy Fund for Social Justice. Link to a full list of organizers and cosponsors and more information about The Louis D. Brandeis Legacy Fund.

For more information about 'DEIS Impact! contact ethics@brandeis.edu.

e