Native American and Indigenous Studies Colloquia

Spring 2019:  American Studies Program Events:

Jack Davis:  The Gulf:  The Making of an American Sea.
March 19th

Stan Brooks:  The Capture of the Green River Killer: The Making of a True Crime Docu-Drama

April 1st

Ross Melnick:  Hollywood and the French Resistance: the Paramount Theater during the Nazi Occupation of Paris
April 16th

Native American and Indigenous Studies Colloquia, Spring 2019:

Jennifer Weston:  The Water is Life Movement:  Standing Rock in Social Justice and Spiritual Context
February 6th

TO BE RESCHEDULED:  Larry Spotted Crow Mann:  When the Land Speaks: Exploring the dynamic relationship between Land, People & Nature through the eyes of the Native Americans of New England

Maria John, Indigenous Health in Settler Colonial Societies: Historical Injustices and Political Responses in the United States and Australia              April 8th

Upcoming Events

American Studies Program Events:

March 19 at 5pm, Schwartz 112
Jack Davis:  The Gulf:  The Making of an American Sea.

Jack Davis, PhD '94, will speak at Brandeis on March 19th, at 5 pm, about his Pulitzer-Prize-winning history of America's gulf coast: The Gulf: The Making of an American Sea.   For more information about his book:   https://www.amazon.com/Gulf-Making-American-Sea/dp/087140866X and Q and A from the Pulitzer committee: https://www.pulitzer.org/article/qa-2018-history-winner-jack-e-davis

April 1 at noon, Lown 2

Stan Brooks:  The Capture of the Green River Killer: The Making of a True Crime Docu-Drama

Stan Brooks is an Emmy Award-winning producer of film and television with over 30 years of industry experience. He has produced more than 70 movies for film and television since 1989, when he founded his first independent production company, Once Upon a Time Films. In 2008, The Capture of the Green River Killer aired, starring Tom Cavanagh. It was his 50th film. The Capture of the Green River Killer is a two-part television film about the 1982-1998 Green River Killer murders. The mini-series remains to this day the highest rated limited series on the network. As a graduate of Brandeis University, Brooks holds a Bachelor of Arts degree and a Master's degree in Fine Arts from the American Film Institute. In addition, he is an Adjunct professor at the American Film Institute for the Advanced Film & Television Studies.

April 16 at 3:30pm, Schwartz 112

Ross Melnick:  Hollywood and the French Resistance: The Paramount Theater during the Nazi Occupation of Paris

In 1927, the first Hollywood-owned and operated cinema in France, Le Paramount, opened in Paris. Over a decade later, Le Paramount’s director, manager, chief projectionist, secretaries, and ushers were all enlisted in a clandestine operation to use the formerly American movie house as a base of French Resistance activities under Nazi occupation. “Hollywood and the French Resistance” examines the history of why and how Hollywood began operating cinemas around the world—from Sao Paulo to Sydney—and how Le Paramount became first a symbol of that cultural and industrial expansion after World War I and then a monument to the work of Hollywood’s (ex-)employees during World War II. Employing wartime newsreels, archival images, and contemporaneous accounts, this talk will reanimate a forgotten history while recounting the many ways in which the war interrupted Hollywood’s international expansion and decimated the offices, cinemas, and lives of its global workforce.

NAIS Colloquia Series:  Spring 2019

The Native American and Indigenous Studies (NAIS) Colloquia Series features talks from scholars, activists, and tribal representatives from Boston and the surrounding area. The objective of the Colloquia is to facilitate conversations about and relationships within NAIS by drawing on the wealth of local and regional resources while exploring Brandeis' responsibilities to Indigenous peoples on occupied land. 

Cancelled:  March 4th, Monday at 5:00pm, ICC (Food provided.)  Will be rescheduled:  stay tuned!

Larry Spotted Crow Mann:  When the Land Speaks: Exploring the dynamic relationship between Land, People & Nature through the eyes of the Native Americans of New England

Larry Spotted Crow Mann is a member of the Nipmuc Tribe of Massachusetts. He is an award-winning writer, poet, cultural educator, storyteller, drummer/dancer, and public speaker on topics including Native American sovereignty, identity, youth sobriety, and cultural and environmental awareness. He is the author of books such as Tales from the Whispering Basket, The Mourning Road to Thanksgiving, and Drumming & Dreaming. He travels throughout the United States, Canada, and parts of Europe to schools, colleges, pow wows, and other organizations sharing Nipmuc music, culture, and history.

April 8th, Monday at 5:00pm, Pearlman Lounge 113 (Food provided.)
Maria JohnIndigenous Health in Settler Colonial Societies: Historical Injustices and Political Responses in the United States and Australia

Maria John is an Assistant Professor of Native American History, and Co-Director of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Program at the University of Massachusetts Boston. She received her PhD in History from Columbia University. In 2016-2017, she was an Indigenous Studies Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the American Studies Department at Wesleyan University. Her research interests include 20th-century urban indigenous histories, comparative histories of settler colonialism, social and political histories of health and healthcare, histories of health activism, and the history of indigenous sovereigntyHer book-in-progress compares health struggles and indigenous health activism among urban indigenous communities in Australia and the United States in the mid-late twentieth century. In 2016, she joined other scholars and activists as part of the NYC Stands with Standing Rock Collective—a working group of Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars and organizers who launched the #StandingwithStandingRock digital syllabus:  https://nycstandswithstandingrock.wordpress.com/standingrocksyllabus/