Courses

Below are the Comparative Literature (COML)-designated courses for Spring 2022. For more information, view the full course list on the Registrar's site.

Spring 2022 COML Courses

poster for COML 100. image of several globes in a circle. text reads same as the description on this page.
COML 100A Introduction to Global Literature

T,F 12:30 PM–1:50 PM, Powelstock (in-person)

Core course for COML major and minor. Cross-listed with ECS, GER, IGS, & RUS.
[DL; HUM; OC]

We will consider these questions from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Students will become acquainted with the basic literary theories and critical tools used in comparative literary studies; gain practical and reflective experience in comparing texts of various genres across time periods, cultures, and languages; and also understand the past, present, and future of Comparative Literature as an intellectual endeavor, especially in view of changing socio-political contexts.

poster for COML 116. image of Nietzsche. text reads same as the description on this page.
COML 116B Nietzsche: An Introduction

T,R 3:30 PM–4:50 PM, Dowden (in-person)

Cross-listed with ECS and GER.

A basic introduction to Friedrich Nietzsche's thoughts and writings.
poster of COML 123. images of writers (Boccaccio, Hawthorne, Marguerite de Navarre) film makers (Wong Kar-wai and Di Sica), and composers (Monteverdi). text reads same  as the description on this page.
COML 123A Perfect Love?

M,W 3:30 PM–4:50 PM, Randall (in-person)

Cross-listed with ECS, HOI, and MERS.

See how some of the greatest writers (Boccaccio, Hawthorne, Marguerite de Navarre) film makers (Wong Kar-wai and Di Sica), and composers (Monteverdi) have treated a problem that almost everyone knows too well:  how the all too-common desire to achieve "perfect love" all too-often ends up on the rocks.

COML/ENG 16B Puppets, Robots, and Other Automata

M,W,Th 1:00 PM–1:50 PM, Williams (in-person)

Explores literary representations of artificial life. Puppets, dolls, clockwork creatures, golems, robots, supercomputers, and A.I.s radically repose the question of what it means to be alive – and, in the process, apply pressure to commonsense notions of what is exclusively human. We will trace a line of thinking from Pinocchio and Frankenstein’s Monster to Battlestar Galactica and Kazuo Ishiguro’s Artificial Friends. How does fear of – and longing for – the more-than-human figure of the automaton illuminate our political and social world?

Upper-Level Courses in a Language Other than English

  • ARBC 103B-1 - Middle Advanced Arabic: Contemporary Arab Media

  • CHIN 120B-1 - Readings in Contemporary Chinese Literature: Advanced Chinese Language II

  • FREN 111A-1 - The Republic

  • HISP 111B-1 - Introduction to Latin American Literature and Culture

  • RUS 153A-1 - Advanced Russian Language through 19th Century Literature

Courses in Related Fields

  • CHIN 136B-1 - Chinese Modernism in International Context
  • CLAS 117B-1 - Unmasking Cleopatra - Gender, Power, and A Legacy
  • ENG 121A-1 - Sex and Culture
  • ENG 152A-1 - Indian Love Stories
  • ENG 66B-1 - Contemporary Global Dystopias
  • HISP 152B-1 - Monsters, Creatures, and Cyborgs in Latin/x American Cinema, Fiction, and BioArt
  • HUM 10A-1 - The Western Canon
  • NEJS 140B-1 - Gender, Ghettos, and the Geographies of Early Modern Jews
  • NEJS 183B-1 - Global Jewish Literature