American Studies News

Please join us in welcoming Michael Socolow on March 16
Michael Socolow presents: Six Minutes in Berlin: The Nazi Olympic Games in Sports and Media History at 4:00 pm in Olin Sang 201. Click for more information...

Joyce Antler Unites To Create Powerful Voice
Professor Emeritus Joyce Antler—along with fellow scholars Susan Quinn, Megan Marshall, Frances Malino, Lois Rudnick, Judith Tick and Roberta Wollons—collectively co-wrote "When Women Speak out for All" an op-ed piece reminding us that Lady Liberty is far from dead.  Click to view the article.

Lewis Black Featured at October 2016 Conference to Mark the Arrival of the Lenny Bruce Archives
lewisblackComedian Lewis Black spoke at the dinner for the two-day conference, "Comedy and the Constitution: the Legacy of Lenny Bruce," which celebrated the arrival of the Lenny Bruce Archives at Brandeis University.

Stan Brooks '79 Recounts Remarkable Recovery
On March 10, 2016, the Huffington Post published "It's Not How Hard You Hit. It's How Hard You Can Get Hit And Keep Moving Forward", which chronicles Stan Brook's recovery from a serious skiing accident. His long recovery took him from a hospital bed to rehab, a wheelchair to walker. Find out how he is doing today: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/stanley-m-brooks/i-hit-a-tree_b_9423842.html

Spotlight Continues to Win Awards
Spotlight EventJosh Singer (pictured 2nd from right) recently won the Writers Guild Award and an award from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts for his work on Spotlight. Spotlight is the true story of how the Boston Globe uncovered the massive scandal of child molestation and cover-up within the local Catholic Archdiocese, shaking the entire Catholic Church to its core. It features our very own American Studies and Journalism professor, Eileen McNamara (pictured 3rd from the right). Last Fall a 2-day event was held that featured a screening of Spotlight and a panel discussion with the "real" Spotlight team.

For more new, please visit: http://www.brandeis.edu/programs/american-studies/Noteworthy%20News.html


American Studies
 

American Studies

The American Studies program offers an interdisciplinary approach to the myths, values, symbols, institutions and behavior of the peoples of the United States and to the questions raised by the influence of the United States in shaping the modern world. The American studies major is designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of the history and major features of American civilization.

Students anticipating careers in law, business, public policy, communications, education, journalism, teaching and careers as professors of American studies, history and literature have typically enrolled in the department.

As a sponsor of programs in law, journalism and environmental studies, the department welcomes students who seek active engagement with the contemporary world through firm grounding in a sound liberal arts education.


Brian Donahue
The American Studies Program is delighted to announce that Brian Donahue, Associate Professor of American Environmental Studies (on the Jack Meyerhoff fund), has been made an elected member of the American Antiquarian Society.  His election to the society is a mark of distinction bestowed upon him by his colleagues in the fields of colonial and early American history.  Professor Donahue's particular research has focused upon the farm and forest history of New England.
The Society's current membership includes scholars, educators, publishers, collectors, cultural administrators, civic leaders, journalists, writers, and filmmakers, as well as lay persons with an interest in the field of American history. Fourteen presidents of the United States have been members, and AAS members have been awarded over sixty Pulitzer Prizes and over fifty Bancroft Prizes for their work. Members have been elected from every region of our nation and from thirty-three foreign countries.

A Statement from the American Studies Program on the decision by the American Studies Association to boycott Israel:

It is a with deep regret that we in the American Studies Program at Brandeis University have decided to discontinue our institutional affiliation with the American Studies Association. We view the vote by the membership to affirm an academic boycott of Israel as a politicization of the discipline and a rebuke to the kind of open inquiry that a scholarly association should foster. We remain committed to the discipline of American Studies but we can no longer support an organization that has rejected two of the core principles of American culture--freedom of association and expression.