New course!

RECS/THA 140A: Russian Theater: Stanislavsky to Present
[ ca hum wi ]
Professor Dmitry Troyanovsky
T,F 11:00 AM–12:20 PM

Throughout its history, Russian theatre has tried to communicate truthfully in a mostly repressive society. This course introduces students to the achievements of theatre artists from Stanislavsky through Post-Modernism. We will examine the work of groundbreaking directors like Meyerhold, Vakhtangov, and Lyubimov. We will read and analyze representative works of major modern and contemporary playwrights. The course load consists of readings, discussions, papers and in-class projects. Usually offered every second year.

Fall 2016 Electives in Russian Studies

COML 171A: Literary Translation in Theory and in Practice
[ hum ]
Professor Pu Wang
T,Th 2:00 PM–3:20 PM

HIST 147A: Imperial Russia: From Westernization to Globalization
[ ss wi ]
Professor Gregory Freeze
M,W 3:30 PM–4:50 PM

HIST 181B: Red Flags/Black Flags: Marxism vs. Anarchism, 1845-1968
[ ss ]
Professor Mark Hulliung
M,W,Th 10:00 AM–10:50 AM

Placement

If you studied Russian before coming to Brandeis and wish to continue studying the language, you must take a placement test to determine your level.

Courses

To view the complete descriptions of the courses that satisfy the requirements for the Russian Studies major/minor, please visit the University Bulletin.

Fall 2016 Courses

For course times, locations, and additional details, please visit the Fall 2016 Schedule of Classes on the University Registrar's website.

Courses Taught in Russian

RUS 10A: Beginning Russian I
Professor Irina Dubinina
M,W,Th 12:00 PM–12:50 PM & F 12:30 PM–1:20 PM

Four class hours and one recitation hour per week.

For students who have had no previous study of Russian. The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) introduction to the Russian language with the focus on developing oral proficiency early on. A systematic presentation of the basic grammar and vocabulary of the language within the context of Russian culture. Usually offered every fall.

RUS 30A: Intermediate Russian I
[ fl ]
Professor Curt Woolhiser
M,W,Th,F 10:00 AM–10:50 AM

Prerequisite: RUS 20b with a grade of C- or higher or the equivalent as determined by placement examination. Four class hours and one recitation hour per week.

For students with some previous study of Russian (RUS 10a and RUS 20b or outside study). Focus on solidifying linguistic performance by creating with the language to produce unrehearsed, meaningful exchanges of information. Refining of structural knowledge and dramatic expansion of vocabulary within the context of Russian culture. Authentic texts and films are used to create context for reviewing and expanding grammar, syntax and vocabulary knowledge. Usually offered every fall.

RUS 150B: Advanced Russian Language through 20th Century Literature (for heritage speakers)
[ fl hum oc ]
Professor Irina Dubinina
M,W 5:00 PM–6:20 PM

Intended for heritage speakers. Non-heritage students interested in the course should contact Professor Irina Dubinina at idubinin@brandeis.edu.

Prerequisite (heritage speakers): RUS 29b, or RUS 50b with a grade of C- or higher, or the equivalent as determined by placement examination.

A seminar for continuing students of Russian who wish to enhance their proficiency and accuracy in speaking, reading and writing. Focusing on the close study of Russian literature in the original Russian and the development of Russian oral and written language skills needed for the close reading and discussion of literature. Usually offered every second year.

Courses Taught in English

RECS 100A: Russian Soul: Masterworks of Modern Russian Culture
[ hum ]
Professor David Powelstock
T,Th 2:00 PM–3:20 PM

Open to all students. Conducted in English. Students may choose to do readings either in English translation or in Russian. Satisfies the Proseminar requirement for the Russian Studies major.

Examines masterpieces of modern Russian culture in literature, film, philosophy, art, music, theater, opera and ballet. How has Russian culture treated such common human themes as life, death, love, language, identity, and community? What makes Russian cultural tradition unique? Usually offered every second year.

RECS/THA 140A: Russian Theater: Stanislavsky to Present
[ ca hum wi ]
Professor Dmitry Troyanovsky
T,F 11:00 AM–12:20 PM

Throughout its history, Russian theatre has tried to communicate truthfully in a mostly repressive society. This course introduces students to the achievements of theatre artists from Stanislavsky through Post-Modernism. We will examine the work of groundbreaking directors like Meyerhold, Vakhtangov, and Lyubimov. We will read and analyze representative works of major modern and contemporary playwrights. The course load consists of readings, discussions, papers and in-class projects. Usually offered every second year.