Fall 2015 Electives in Russian Studies

HIST 147A: Imperial Russia: From Westernization to Globalization
Gregory Freeze

Examines the processes and problems of modernization--state development, economic growth, social change, cultural achievements, and emergence of revolutionary and terrorist movements. Usually offered every year.

NEJS 141A: Russian Jews in the Twentieth Century
ChaeRan Freeze

Examines Russian Jewish history from 1917 to the present. Focuses on the tsarist legacy, Russian Revolution, the creation of a new socialist society, development of Yiddish culture, the "Great Turn" under Stalin, Holocaust, post war Judaism, anti-Semitism, emigration, and current events. Usually offered every second year.

Did you know?

RUS 105A: Russia Today: Advanced Language Skills through Contemporary Culture offers sections for heritage speakers and non-heritage speakers.

Placement

If you studied Russian before coming to Brandeis and wish to continue studying the language, you must take a placement test to determine your level.

Courses

To view the complete descriptions of the courses that satisfy the requirements for the Russian Studies major/minor, please visit the University Bulletin.

Fall 2015 Courses

For course times, locations, and additional details, please visit the Fall 2015 Schedule of Classes on the University Registrar's website.

RUS 10A: Beginning Russian
Irina Dubinina

Four class hours and one recitation hour per week.

For students who have had no previous study of Russian. A systematic presentation of the basic grammar and vocabulary of the language within the context of Russian culture, with focus on all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Usually offered every year.

RUS 30A: Intermediate Russian
Curt Woolhiser

Prerequisite: RUS 20b with a grade of C- or higher or the equivalent as determined by placement examination. Four class hours and one recitation hour per week.

For students with some previous study of Russian (RUS 10a and RUS 20b). Refining of grammatical knowledge and expansion of vocabulary within the context of Russian culture. Focus on communicative competence in Russian and special attention to reading and writing skills. Usually offered every fall.

RUS 105A: Russia Today: Advanced Language Skills through Contemporary Culture
Irina Dubinina

Prerequisite: RUS 29b, RUS 40b or RUS 50b with a grade of C- or higher, or the equivalent as determined by placement examination. Taught in Russian.

For advanced and heritage students of Russian language who wish to expand their vocabulary and refine their grammar and communicative skills. Explores aspects of contemporary Russian society and culture. Focus on linguistic and cultural analysis of various types of texts: from contemporary prose to the Russian press (including the Internet), selected films, and pop culture artifacts. Usually offered every fourth year.

RECS 135A: The Short Story in Russia
Robin Feuer Miller

Open to all students. Conducted in English. Students may choose to do readings either in English translation or in Russian.

Focuses on the great tradition of the short story as practiced by Russian and Russian Jewish writers and the connection and divisions among them. This genre invites extreme stylistic and narrative experimentation ranging from the comic to the tragic, as well as being a vehicle for striking expressions of complex social, philosophical, and religious themes. Usually offered every second year.

RECS 147B: Tolstoy: Freedom, Chance, and Necessity
Robin Feuer Miller

Open to all students. Conducted in English. Students may choose to do readings either in English translation or in Russian.

Studies the major short stories and novels of Leo Tolstoy against the backdrop of nineteenth-century history and with reference to twentieth-century critical theory. Usually offered every second year.

RECS 154A: The Art of Vladimir Nabokov
David Powelstock

Open to all students. Conducted in English. Readings in English.

A concentrated study of Vladimir Nabokov, the most noted Russian author living in emigration and one of the most influential novelists of the twentieth century. Focuses on the major Russian- and English-language novels. Usually offered every second year.