New course!

RECS 161B: Slavic Folklore and Myth: Epic Heroes, Lucky Fools, Iron-Toothed Witches and the Undead
[ hum ]
Professor Curt Woolhiser
T,Th 3:30 PM–4:50 PM

Explores the magical and mysterious world of Russian and Slavic folklore, including folk mythology and demonology, seasonal rituals and folk magic, proverbs and riddles, folk tales and oral epic poetry. Coursework will consist of readings, discussions, papers, and projects.

Spring 2017 Core Course in Russian Studies

COML 100A: Introduction to Global Literature
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Professor Matthew Fraleigh
T,Th 2:00 PM–3:20 PM

Spring 2017 Electives in Russian Studies

COML 185A: Dickens and Dostoevsky
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Professor Robin Feuer Miller
M,W 3:30 PM–4:50 PM

HIST 147B: Twentieth-Century Russia
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Professor Gregory Freeze
M,W,Th 11:00 AM–11:50 AM

NEJS 141A: Russian Jews in the Twentieth Century
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Professor ChaeRan Freeze
T,F 9:30 AM–10:50 AM

Placement

If you studied Russian before coming to Brandeis and wish to continue studying the language, you must take a placement test to determine your level.

Courses

To view the complete descriptions of the courses that satisfy the requirements for the Russian Studies major/minor, please visit the University Bulletin.

Spring 2017 Courses

Russian Studies PostcardFor course times, locations, and additional details, please visit the Spring 2017 Schedule of Classes on the University Registrar's website.

Courses Taught in Russian

RUS 20B: Beginning Russian II
Professor Irina Dubinina
M,W,Th 12:00 PM–12:50 PM & F 12:30 PM–1:20 PM

Prerequisite: RUS 10a with a grade of C- or higher or the equivalent as determined by placement examination. Four class hours and one recitation hour per week.

For students with some previous study of Russian. Continuing development of proficiency across all four skills with the goal of reaching the Intermediate-Low level (ACTFL scale). Student-centered classes emphasize conversation and structural accuracy. Students will complete the learning of the grammatical architecture of the language and expand their vocabulary. Usually offered every spring.

RUS 29B: Russian Language for Russian Speakers
Professor Irina Dubinina
M,W 3:30 PM–4:50 PM

May not be taken for credit by students who took RUS 110a or 50b in prior years.

Designed to meet the needs of heritage speakers of Russian who have had little or no formal training in their home language and who want to develop their reading and writing skills. An introduction of the rules of Russian orthography, morphology and syntax with emphasis on developing bilingual competencies and a systematic understanding of the structure of the Russian language. Russian linguistic system is presented in context: readings range from short works of prose fiction to articles from the contemporary Russian press. Usually offered every spring.

RUS 40B: Intermediate Russian II
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Staff
M,W,Th,F 10:00 AM–10:50 AM

Prerequisite: RUS 30a with a grade of C- or higher or the equivalent as determined by placement examination. Four class hours and one recitation hour per week.

Focuses on expanding the range of contexts for language use and pushing for a greater ease and structural accuracy of language production. Further refining of grammar and vocabulary within the context of Russian culture. Authentic texts and films are used for creating context for reviewing and expanding grammar, syntax and vocabulary knowledge. Usually offered every spring semester.

RUS 160B: Russian/Soviet Jews: Dual Identities in Text, Image and Music
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Professor Irina Dubinina
M,W 5:00 PM–6:20 PM

Prerequisite: Advanced Russian language skills.

An undergraduate seminar introduces heritage and advanced students of Russian to a number of Russian Jewish artists and writers who created in the Russian language and who made significant contributions to 20th-century Soviet and Russian literature, cinema, theater, and music. Through analyses and discussions of texts, images and music created by Russian-speaking Jews, students will explore the role Russian Jews played in shaping the Soviet and modern Russian culture. Usually offered every fourth year.

Courses Taught in English

RECS 135A: Russian Short Fictions: The Art of Narrative
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Professor Robin Feuer Miller
M,W 2:00 PM–3:20 PM

Open to all students. Conducted in English. Students may choose to do readings either in English translation or in Russian.

Focuses on the great tradition of the short story as practiced by Russian and Russian Jewish writers and the connection and divisions among them. This genre invites extreme stylistic and narrative experimentation ranging from the comic to the tragic, as well as being a vehicle for striking expressions of complex social, philosophical, and religious themes. Usually offered every second year.

RECS 150A: Russian and Soviet Cinema
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Professor David Powelstock
T,Th 2:00 PM–3:20 PM

Open to all students. Conducted in English. Readings in English.

Examines the Russian/Soviet cinematic tradition from the silent era to today, with special attention to cultural context and visual elements. Film masterpieces directed by Bauer, Eisenstein, Vertov, Parajanov, Tarkovsky, Mikhalkov, and others. Weekly screenings. Usually offered every second year.

RECS 161B: Slavic Folklore and Myth: Epic Heroes, Lucky Fools, Iron-Toothed Witches and the Undead
[ hum ]
Professor Curt Woolhiser
T,Th 3:30 PM–4:50 PM

Explores the magical and mysterious world of Russian and Slavic folklore, including folk mythology and demonology, seasonal rituals and folk magic, proverbs and riddles, folk tales and oral epic poetry. Coursework will consist of readings, discussions, papers, and projects.