PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS BELOW.

1. Students currently enrolled in HISP language courses (HISP 10-105) will receive instructions about consent code distribution before the beginning of registration.

2. All others should email Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) as soon as possible with a description of their background in Spanish, including classes taken, standardized test scores, and/or other exposure to the language. She will reply with further instructions about obtaining a consent code for the appropriate language course.

3. Heritage speakers (those who grew up speaking Spanish) should also describe their language background in an email to Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) who will give them additional information.

Spring 2017 Hispanic Studies Courses

Schedule information is tentative. Please see the Registrar's Schedule of Classes for current listings.


ALL STUDENTS NEED A CONSENT CODE TO ENROLL IN SPANISH LANGUAGE COURSES (HISP 10–108). PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS IN BAR TO RIGHT.


HISP 10A Beginning Spanish
(1) M,T,W,Th 10:00–10:50, Arteta
Prerequisite: Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
For students who have had no previous study of Spanish. A systematic presentation of the basic grammar and vocabulary of the language within the context of Hispanic culture, with focus on all five language skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and sociocultural awareness.

HISP 20B Continuing Spanish
(1) M,W,Th,F 10:00–10:50, Malinowska
(2) M,T,W,Th 11:00–11:50, Reyes de Deu
(3) M,T,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Reyes de Deu
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 10a or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
For students with some previous study of Spanish: a continuing presentation of the basic grammar and vocabulary of the language within the context of Hispanic culture with focus on all five language skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and sociocultural awareness.

HISP 32A Intermediate Spanish: Conversation
(1) M,W,Th,F 9:00–9:50, Malinowska
(2) M,W,Th,F 10:00–10:50, Mederos
(3) M,T,W,Th 11:00–11:50, Arteta
(4) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50; F 12:30–1:20, Mederos
(5) M,T,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Arteta
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 20b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
This course focuses on the development of oral expression and conversational skills in the context of a continuing development of linguistic competence in Spanish.

HISP 34A Intermediate Spanish: Topics in Hispanic Culture
(1) M,T,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Perdomo
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 20b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Topics or themes from Hispanic cultures are the context for continuing development of linguistic competence in Spanish.

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HISP 104B Peoples, Ideas, and Language of the Hispanic World
(1) M,W,Th 10:00–10:50, González Ros
(2) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, González Ros
Prerequisite: HISP 32 or 34. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Participants will expand their skills in Spanish while deepening their understanding of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on aspects of the history and ideas that shape the Spanish-speaking world, from its peninsular origins to the realities of Spanish-speakers in the Americas.

HISP 105A Spanish Conversation and Grammar
(1) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, Perdomo
(2) M,W 2:00–3:20, Perdomo
Prerequisite: HISP 104b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Students learn to communicate effectively in Spanish through class discussions, oral and written exercises, presentations, literary and cultural readings, film, and explorations of the mass media. Emphasis on improvement of oral and written fluency, and the continued acquisition of vocabulary and grammar structures.

HISP 106B Spanish Composition, Grammar, and Stylistics
(1) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, Brown
(2) M,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Malinowska
Prerequisite: HISP 105a or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Focuses on written communication and the improvement of writing skills including the development of ideas, outlining, and editing. Literary selections are used to help students to continue focusing on language—vocabulary, structures, and elements of texts; they serve as topics for class discussion and writing as well as an introduction to the principles of literary analysis.

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HISP 108A Spanish for Heritage Speakers
(1) M,W 2:00–3:20, Mederos
Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Designed specifically for students who grew up speaking Spanish and who would like to enhance existing language skills while developing higher levels of academic proficiency. Assignments are geared toward developing skills in reading, writing, and critical thinking about U.S. Latin@s and the Spanish-speaking world. Students may use this course to fulfill the foreign language requirement.

image of poster for hisp 109 spring 2017
HISP 109B Introduction to Modern Spanish Cultural Studies: Modernity

(1) T,Th 2:00–3:20, Mandrell
Prerequisite: HISP 106b, or HISP 108a, or permission of instructor.
We will study Spanish culture from the eighteenth century to the present through a consideration of shifting notions of modernity as seen in drama, fiction, and poetry, as well as periodical literature, newscasts, and film.

image of poster for HISP 111 spring 2017
HISP 111B Introduction to Latin American Literature and Culture

(1) M,W 3:30–4:50, Reyes de Deu
Prerequisite: HISP 106b, or HISP 108a, or permission of instructor.
Examines key Latin American texts of different genres (poems, short stories and excerpts from novels, chronicles, comics, screenplays, cyberfiction) and from different time periods from the conquest to modernity. This class places emphasis on problems of cultural definition and identity construction as they are elaborated in literary discourse. Identifying major themes (coloniality and emancipation, modernismo and modernity, indigenismo, hybridity and mestizaje, nationalisms, Pan-Americanism, etc.) we will trace continuities and ruptures throughout Latin American intellectual history.

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image of poster for HISP 120 spring 2017
HISP 120B Don Quijote

(1) T,Th 5:00–6:20, Mandrell
Taught in English.
In our reading of Cervantes' Don Quijote we will consider it as a compendium of prior literary genres, the first modern novel, a funny book, a deep meditation on the human condition, and the best novel ever written.

image of poster for HISP 160 spring 2017
HISP 160A Culture and Social Change in Latin America

(1) M,W 2:00–3:20, Rosenberg
Prerequisite: HISP 109b, or HISP 110a, or HISP 111b, or permission of the instructor.
We will examine the relationship between art (including literature, film, and fine arts) and society in Latin America during the twentieth century. We will use significant examples drawn from three major socio-historical eras: the political and artistic vanguards of the 1920s (with particular attention to the Mexican Revolution and its aftermath); the 1960s and the cultural significance of the Cuban Revolution; and the 1990s period of transition to democracy and emergence of identity and minority-based social movements, with a renewed significance of artistic and literary languages.

image of poster for HISP 180 spring 2017
HISP 180A Topics in Twentieth- and Twenty-First Century Spanish Literature and Culture
Topic for spring 2017: Spanish Detective Fiction.

(1) T,Th 3:30–4:50, Mandrell
Prerequisite: HISP 109b or HISP 110a or HISP 111b, or permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit.
In this course we will trace the development of detective fiction in modern Spain.  We will pay particular attention to the relationship between questions of genre (what is a fiction of detection? where does it come from and why? how is it translated into the Spanish literary tradition?) and gender (who does what in these novels?).


COURSES TAUGHT BY HISPANIC STUDIES FACULTY

CAST 170A Documenting the Immigrant Experience
(1) T 2:00–4:50, Perdomo
Investigates documentary film as a genre, and explores the potential of the medium for engaging students with immigrant communities in Waltham through hands-on production experiences. Through the process of exchanging narratives with community members, students generate raw material for a film documentary.

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Schedule information is tentative. Please see the Registrar's Schedule of Classes for current listings.