PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS BELOW.

1. Students currently enrolled in HISP language courses (HISP 10-105) will receive instructions about consent code distribution before the beginning of registration.

2. All others should email Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) as soon as possible with a description of their background in Spanish, including classes taken, standardized test scores, and/or other exposure to the language. She will reply with further instructions about obtaining a consent code for the appropriate language course.

3. Heritage speakers (those who grew up speaking Spanish) should also describe their language background in an email to Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) who will give them additional information.

Spring 2016 Hispanic Studies Courses

Schedule information is tentative. Please see the Registrar's Schedule of Classes for current listings.


ALL STUDENTS NEED A CONSENT CODE TO ENROLL IN SPANISH LANGUAGE COURSES (HISP 10–108). PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS IN BAR TO RIGHT.


HISP 10A Beginning Spanish
(1) M,W,Th,F 9:00–9:50, Arteta
Prerequisite: Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
For students who have had no previous study of Spanish. A systematic presentation of the basic grammar and vocabulary of the language within the context of Hispanic culture, with focus on all five language skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and sociocultural awareness.

HISP 20B Continuing Spanish
(1) M,T,W,Th 9:00–9:50, Burstin
(2) M,T,W,Th 10:00–10:50, Perdomo
(3) M,T,W,Th 11:00–11:50, Burstin
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 10a or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
For students with some previous study of Spanish: a continuing presentation of the basic grammar and vocabulary of the language within the context of Hispanic culture with focus on all five language skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and sociocultural awareness.

HISP 32A Intermediate Spanish: Conversation
(1) M,W,Th,F 9:00–9:50, Mederos
(2) M,W,Th,F 10:00–10:50, Mederos
(3) M,W,Th,F 11:00–11:50, Arteta
(4) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, F 12:30–1:20, Arteta
(5) M,T,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Burstin
(6) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, F 12:30–1:20, Mederos ←New Section!
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 20b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
This course focuses on the development of oral expression and conversational skills in the context of a continuing development of linguistic competence in Spanish.

HISP 104B Peoples, Ideas, and Language of the Hispanic World
(1) M,W,Th 10:00–10:50, González Ros
(2) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, González Ros
Prerequisite: HISP 32 or 34. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Participants will expand their skills in Spanish while deepening their understanding of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on aspects of the history and ideas that shape the Spanish—speaking world, from its peninsular origins to the realities of Spanish—speakers in the Americas.

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HISP 105A Spanish Conversation and Grammar
(1) M,W,Th 11:00–11:50, Perdomo
(2) M,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Perdomo
Prerequisite: HISP 104b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Students learn to communicate effectively in Spanish through class discussions, oral and written exercises, presentations, literary and cultural readings, film, and explorations of the mass media. Emphasis on improvement of oral and written fluency, and the continued acquisition of vocabulary and grammar structures.

HISP 106B Spanish Composition, Grammar, and Stylistics
(1) M,W 2:00–3:20, Reyes de Deu
(2) M,W 3:30–4:50, Reyes de Deu
Prerequisite: HISP 105a or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Focuses on written communication and the improvement of writing skills including the development of ideas, outlining, and editing. Literary selections are used to help students to continue focusing on language—vocabulary, structures, and elements of texts; they serve as topics for class discussion and writing as well as an introduction to the principles of literary analysis.

HISP 108A Spanish for Heritage Speakers
(1) M,W,Th 1:00–1:50, González Ros
Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Designed specifically for students who grew up speaking Spanish and who would like to enhance existing language skills while developing higher levels of academic proficiency. Assignments are geared toward developing skills in reading, writing, and critical thinking about U.S. Latin@s and the Spanish-speaking world. Students may use this course to fulfill the foreign language requirement.

HISP 111B Introduction to Latin American Literature & Culture: Literature, Media, Community
(1) T,Th 2:00–3:20, Arellano
Prerequisite: HISP 106b, or HISP 108a, or permission of instructor.
Examines key Latin American texts of different genres (poems, short stories and excerpts from novels, chronicles, comics, screenplays, cyberfiction) and from different time periods from the conquest to modernity. This class places emphasis on problems of cultural definition and identity construction as they are elaborated in literary discourse. Identifying major themes (coloniality and emancipation, modernismo and modernity, indigenismo, hybridity and mestizaje, nationalisms, Pan-Americanism, etc.) we will trace continuities and ruptures throughout Latin American intellectual history.

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image of poster for HISP 162 spring 2016
HISP 162B New Latin American Cinema: From Revolution to the Market

(1) M,W 5:00–6:20, Rosenberg
Prerequisite: HISP 109b, or HISP 110a, or HISP 111b, or permission of the instructor.
Studies and compares two pivotal periods of film production, both of which were considered "new waves" of Latin American cinema. On the one hand, the new cinemas of the 1960s and 1970s, which accompanied moments of radical change and movements of revolutionary insurrection. On the other hand, the film boom of the 1990s and 2000s, in which aesthetic experimentation intersected with new realities of neoliberal policies and market globalization.

image of poster for HISP 165 spring 2016
HISP 165B The Storyteller: Short Fiction in Latin America
(1) M,W 3:30–4:50, Rosenberg
Prerequisite: HISP 109b, or HISP 110a, or HISP 111b, or permission of instructor.
Through a study of Latin American short stories, we will reflect on the power of storytelling and fictional narrative to shape subjectivity and community. We will also examine some culturally specific topics reflected in these stories, such as conflictive cultural filiations (pre-Columbian, European, etc.), the tension between literacy and oral traditions, the dynamics of modernity in the periphery, and the formation of the reading public and citizenship. This class has an experiential-creative component, as students will have the chance to write fiction, applying techniques studied in class. In addition, when the practicum is offered students will have the opportunity to organize a story-telling event working with Waltham's Spanish-speaking community.

image of poster for HISP 196 spring 2016
HISP 196A Topics in Latin@ Literature and Culture
(1) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, Reyes de Deu
May be repeated for credit. Taught in Spanish in spring 2016. Prerequisite: HISP 109b, or HISP 110a, or HISP 111b, or permission of instructor.
Explores the complexities of the Latin@ experience and the different ways in which art communicates that experience. Students will examine literature, films, and art in order to understand the political and historical issues that shape Latin@ cultural production in the US.

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CROSS-LISTED WITH HISPANIC STUDIES

image of poster of COML 164b spring 2016
COML 164B Reading Screenplays

(1) T,F 11:00–12:20, Arellano
How do you read a screenplay? Are screenplays artworks in their own right, independent from the film they were turned into or might become? Why do creative industries value the work of screenplay readers? This course serves as an introduction to the emergent field of screenwriting studies and demonstrates the professional application of screenplay analysis in the contemporary media industry. A professional script reader and development executive will feature as guest speaker. Materials include Hollywood screenplays, foreign language scripts in translation, and unproduced screenplays under consideration with production companies.


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Schedule information is tentative. Please see the Registrar's Schedule of Classes for current listings.