Before you enroll in Spanish language courses (HISP 10–108):

PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS BELOW.

1. Students currently enrolled in HISP language courses (HISP 10-105) will receive instructions about consent code distribution before the beginning of registration.

2. All others should email Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) as soon as possible with a description of their background in Spanish, including classes taken, standardized test scores, and/or other exposure to the language. She will reply with further instructions about obtaining a consent code for the appropriate language course.

3. Heritage speakers (those who grew up speaking Spanish) should also describe their language background in an email to Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) who will give them additional information.

Spring 2015 Hispanic Studies Courses

Schedule information is tentative. Please see http://www.brandeis.edu /registrar/schedule/classes/2015/Spring/6600/all for current listings.


ALL STUDENTS NEED A CONSENT CODE TO ENROLL IN SPANISH LANGUAGE COURSES (HISP 10–108). PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS IN BAR TO RIGHT.


Newly available to all students (changed from FYS to HECS):
If you would like to enroll in this class, please send your name and SAGE ID number to Professor Fernando Rosenberg (ferosen@brandeis.edu) a.s.a.p., and he will have the Registrar add you to the class roster.

HECS 42B Literature and Human Rights in Latin America
M,W 3:30–4:50, Rosenberg
HECS 42b Sp15 Poster


HISP 10A Beginning Spanish
(1) M,W,Th,F 11:00–11:50, Arteta
Prerequisite: Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
For students who have had no previous study of Spanish. A systematic presentation of the basic grammar and vocabulary of the language within the context of Hispanic culture, with focus on all five language skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and sociocultural awareness.

HISP 20B Continuing Spanish
(1) M,T,W,Th  10:00–10:50, Staff
(2) M,T,W,Th  10:00–10:50, Burstin
(3) M,T,W,Th  1:00–1:50, Burstin
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 10a or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
For students with some previous study of Spanish: a continuing presentation of the basic grammar and vocabulary of the language within the context of Hispanic culture with focus on all five language skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and sociocultural awareness. 

HISP 32A Intermediate Spanish: Conversation
(1) M,T,W,Th  9:00–9:50, Burstin
(2) M,T,W,Th  10:00–10:50, Reyes de Deu
(3) M,T,W,Th  11:00–11:50, Reyes de Deu
(4) M,W,Th  12:00–12:50; F  12:30–1:20, Arteta
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 20b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
This course focuses on the development of oral expression and conversational skills in the context of a continuing development of linguistic competence in Spanish. 

HISP 34A Intermediate Spanish: Topics in Hispanic Culture
(1) M,T,W,Th  10:00–10:50, Perdomo
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 20b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Topics or themes from Hispanic cultures are the context for continuing development of linguistic competence in Spanish.

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HISP 104B Peoples, Ideas, and Language of the Hispanic World
(1) M,W,Th  9:00–9:50, González Ros
(2) M,W,Th  10:00–10:50, González Ros
Prerequisite: HISP 32 or 34. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Participants will expand their skills in Spanish while deepening their understanding of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on aspects of the history and ideas that shape the Spanish—speaking world, from its peninsular origins to the realities of Spanish—speakers in the Americas.

HISP 105A Spanish Conversation and Grammar
(1) M,W,Th  12:00–12:50, Perdomo
(2) M,W,Th  1:00–1:50, Perdomo
Prerequisite: HISP 104b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Students learn to communicate effectively in Spanish through class discussions, oral and written exercises, presentations, literary and cultural readings, film, and explorations of the mass media. Emphasis on improvement of oral and written fluency, and the continued acquisition of vocabulary and grammar structures.

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HISP 106B Spanish Composition, Grammar, and Stylistics
(1) T,Th  2:00–3:20, Staff
(2) M,W  2:00–3:20, Reyes de Deu
Prerequisite: HISP 105a or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Focuses on written communication and the improvement of writing skills including the development of ideas, outlining, and editing. Literary selections are used to help students to continue focusing on language—vocabulary, structures, and elements of texts; they serve as topics for class discussion and writing as well as an introduction to the principles of literary analysis.

HISP 108A Spanish for Heritage Speakers
(1) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, González Ros
Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Designed specifically for students who grew up speaking Spanish and who would like to enhance existing language skills while developing higher levels of academic proficiency. Assignments are geared toward developing skills in reading, writing, and critical thinking about U.S. Latino/as and the Spanish-speaking world. Students may use this course to fulfill the foreign language requirement.
 
HISP 109B Introduction to Modern Spanish Cultural Studies: Modernity
(1) T,Th 2:00–3:20, Mandrell
Prerequisite: HISP 106b, or HISP 108a, or permission of the instructor.
Introduces students to basic ideas with respect to the study of Hispanic cultures. "Texts" are drawn from a variety of cultures and traditions and might include literature, film, architecture, maps, music, and even pop stars and pop-star wannabes.
 
HISP 111B Introduction to Latin American Literature & Culture: Literature, Media & Community in Latin America
(1) T,F 12:30–1:50, Arellano
Prerequisite: HISP 106b, or HISP 108a, or permission of the instructor.
HISP 111 Sp15 Poster
The goal of this course is to recognize major trends in Latin American literary and cultural production. We will examine a range of key Latin American texts (poems, short stories and excerpts from novels, chronicles) from the time of the conquest to modern and contemporary times. Emphasis is placed on problems of cultural definition and identity construction as they are elaborated in literary discourse.
 
HISP 121B Teatro Español: Lope y Lorca
(1) T,F 11:00–12:20, Fox
Prerequisite: HISP 109b, or HISP 110a, or HISP 111b, or permission of the instructor.
Examines drama of Federico García Lorca (1898-1936) in the context of that of Lope de Vega (1561-1635), considering theories of theater, gender, and sexuality. Both writers were renowned during their lifetimes and mythicized afterwards for their art and their remarkable personal lives.
 
HISP 128B Picaros, Prostitutes, and Peasants: Representations of the Underclass in Early Modern Spain
(1) T,F 12:30–1:50, Fox
Prerequisite: HISP 109b, or HISP 110a, or HISP 111b, or permission of the instructor.
Explores cultural expressions of privation and privilege through the lenses of economic means, ethnicity, gender and religion in early modern Spain. Texts include a picaresque novel, a dialog set in a bawdy house, and a play about class and gender violence.
 
HISP 160A Culture and Social Change in Latin America   
(1) M,W 2:00–3:20, Rosenberg
Prerequisite: HISP 109b, or HISP 110a, or HISP 111b, or permission of the instructor.
We will examine the relationship between art (including literature, film, and fine arts) and society in Latin America
during the twentieth century. We will use significant examples drawn from three major socio-historical eras: the political and artistic vanguards of the 1920s (with particular attention to the Mexican Revolution and its aftermath); the 1960s and the cultural significance of the Cuban Revolution; and the 1990s period of transition to democracy and emergence of identity and minority-based social movements, with a renewed significance of artistic and literary languages.
 
HISP 167B Twice-Told Tales: Colonial Encounters and Postcolonial Fiction in the Americas
(1) T,Th 5:00–6:20, Arellano
A wide range of modern and contemporary writers and artists in the Americas have examined the legacies of European colonialism in the continent. This course explores this persistent engagement with colonialism in narrative fiction and cinema from Latin American and the United States. The first part of the course introduces key texts from the colonial period, written by European and indigenous chroniclers of the colonization of the New World. In the second part of the course we look at fiction, film, and visual art by Latin American, African American and Native American artists who set out to retell colonial histories in the present, oftentimes in controversial ways. Materials discussed include works by Juan José Saer, Octavia Butler, Coco Fusco, Guillermo Gómez Peña, Gerald Vizenor, Peter Greenaway, and Nelson Pereira dos Santos, among others. Taught in English.

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Schedule information is tentative. Please see http://www.brandeis.edu /registrar/schedule/classes/2015/Spring/6600/all for current listings.