PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS BELOW.

1. Students currently enrolled in HISP language courses (HISP 10-105) will receive instructions about consent code distribution before the beginning of registration.

2. All others should email Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) as soon as possible with a description of their background in Spanish, including classes taken, standardized test scores, and/or other exposure to the language. She will reply with further instructions about obtaining a consent code for the appropriate language course.

3. Heritage speakers (those who grew up speaking Spanish) should also describe their language background in an email to Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) who will give them additional information.

Fall 2016 Hispanic Studies Courses

Schedule information is tentative. Please see the Registrar's Schedule of Classes for current listings.


ALL STUDENTS NEED A CONSENT CODE TO ENROLL IN SPANISH LANGUAGE COURSES (HISP 10–108). PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS IN BAR TO RIGHT.


HISP 10A Beginning Spanish
(1) M,W,Th,F 9:00–9:50, Arteta
(2) M,W,Th,F 10:00–10:50, Arteta
Prerequisite: Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
For students who have had no previous study of Spanish. A systematic presentation of the basic grammar and vocabulary of the language within the context of Hispanic culture, with focus on all five language skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and sociocultural awareness.

HISP 20B Continuing Spanish
(1) M,T,W,Th 9:00–9:50, Burstin
(3) M,T,W,Th 11:00–11:50, Burstin
(4) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, F 12:30–1:20, Mederos
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 10a or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
For students with some previous study of Spanish: a continuing presentation of the basic grammar and vocabulary of the language within the context of Hispanic culture with focus on all five language skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and sociocultural awareness.

HISP 32A Intermediate Spanish: Conversation
(1) M,W,Th,F 9:00–9:50, Mederos
(2) M,W,Th,F 10:00–10:50, Mederos
(3) M,T,W,Th 11:00–11:50, Perdomo
(4) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, F 12:30–1:20, Arteta
(5) M,T,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Burstin
(6) M,W,Th,F 1:00–1:50, González Ros
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 20b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
This course focuses on the development of oral expression and conversational skills in the context of a continuing development of linguistic competence in Spanish.

HISP 34A Intermediate Spanish: Topics in Hispanic Culture
(1) M,T,W,Th 10:00–10:50 Perdomo
(2) M,T,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Perdomo
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 20b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Topics or themes from Hispanic cultures are the context for continuing development of linguistic competence in Spanish.

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HISP 104B Peoples, Ideas, and Language of the Hispanic World
(1) M,W,Th 11:00–11:50, González Ros
(2) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, González Ros
Prerequisite: HISP 32 or 34. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Participants will expand their skills in Spanish while deepening their understanding of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on aspects of the history and ideas that shape the Spanish-speaking world, from its peninsular origins to the realities of Spanish-speakers in the Americas.

HISP 105A Spanish Conversation and Grammar
(2) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, Perdomo
Prerequisite: HISP 104b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Students learn to communicate effectively in Spanish through class discussions, oral and written exercises, presentations, literary and cultural readings, film, and explorations of the mass media. Emphasis on improvement of oral and written fluency, and the continued acquisition of vocabulary and grammar structures.

HISP 105A Special Topic: Spanish for Medical Professions
(3) M,W 2:00–3:20, Reyes de Deu
Prerequisite: HISP 104b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
This course is designed to provide students with practice in spoken Spanish using meaningful and applicable medical terminology. Special attention will be given to relevant cultural differences, and the class will discuss how cultural notions may influence Spanish-speaking patients’ healthcare behaviors and doctor/patient communication. The course will supply a review of simple and complex grammatical structures upon which students can build throughout their professional careers. Students will be exposed to intense conversational practice and use Spanish in a variety of interactive class activities such as interviews, dialogues, debates, discussions, and presentations.

HISP 106B Spanish Composition, Grammar, and Stylistics
(1) M,W,Th 11:00–11:50, Reyes de Deu
(2) M,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Reyes de Deu
Prerequisite: HISP 105a or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Focuses on written communication and the improvement of writing skills including the development of ideas, outlining, and editing. Literary selections are used to help students to continue focusing on language—vocabulary, structures, and elements of texts; they serve as topics for class discussion and writing as well as an introduction to the principles of literary analysis.

image of poster for HISP 110

HISP 110A Heroes and Anti-Heroes of Medieval and Early Modern Spanish Literature
(1) M,W 2:00–3:20, Mandrell
Prerequisite: HISP 106b, or HISP 108a, or permission of instructor.
Examines four foundational characters of Hispanic culture—the Cid, the Celestina, Lazarillo de Tormes, and Don Juan Tenorio—in terms of the cultural values they express and carry with them as they are adapted in later texts and contexts.

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poster for HISP 111b fall 2016

HISP 111B Introduction to Latin American Literature & Culture
(1) T,F 12:30–1:50, Rosenberg
Prerequisite: HISP 106b, or HISP 108a, or permission of instructor.
Examines key Latin American texts of different genres (poems, short stories and excerpts from novels, chronicles, comics, screenplays, cyberfiction) and from different time periods from the conquest to modernity. This class places emphasis on problems of cultural definition and identity construction as they are elaborated in literary discourse. Identifying major themes (coloniality and emancipation, modernismo and modernity, indigenismo, hybridity and mestizaje, nationalisms, Pan-Americanism, etc.) we will trace continuities and ruptures throughout Latin American intellectual history.

HISP 125B Literary Women in Early Modern Spain
(1) T,F 11:00–12:20, Fox
Prerequisite: HISP 109b, or HISP 110a, or HISP 111b, or permission of the instructor.
Examines works by and about women in early modern Spain, with particular attention to engagements with and subversions of patriarchal culture in theater, prose, and poetry. Writers include Caro, Zayas, Cervantes, and Tirso de Molina.

HISP 193B Topics in Cinema: Mexican cinema
(1) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, Mandrell
Taught in English: open to all students. Course may be repeated for credit.
In this course we will consider Mexican movies after NAFTA.  We will try to understand each film first as an independent work and then as part of a broader set of texts.  Our goal will be to arrive at a deeper understanding of Mexican society, culture, and history as articulated through film, particularly notions of the family, masculinity, and urban culture.

HISP 198A Experiential Research Seminar in Literary and Cultural Studies
(1) T 2:00–4:50, Rosenberg
Prerequisite: HISP 109b or HISP 110a or HISP 111b, or permission of the instructor.
This is a capstone course for students majoring in Hispanic Studies at Brandeis and is also open to other students interested in pursuing a semester-long research project.

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CROSS-LISTED WITH HISPANIC STUDIES

HUM/UWS 1A Tragedy: Love and Death in the Creative Imagination
(1) M,W,Th 11:00–11:50, Burt/Dowden
Enrollment limited to Humanities Fellows.
How do you turn catastrophe into art - and why? This first-year seminar in the humanities addresses such elemental questions, especially those centering on love and death. How does literature catch hold of catastrophic experiences and make them intelligible or even beautiful? Should misery even be beautiful? By exploring the tragic tradition in literature across many eras, cultures, genres, and languages, this course looks for basic patterns.

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Schedule information is tentative. Please see the Registrar's Schedule of Classes for current listings.