Courses

For a full list of courses offered next semester, download the PDF brochure: French and Francophone Studies Course Offerings Fall 2020.

Language Courses

All students need a consent code to enroll in French Language Courses (FREN 10-106).

  • Students currently enrolled in FREN language courses (FREN 10-105) will receive instructions about consent code distribution before the beginning of registration.
  • All others should email Professor Harder as soon as possible with a description of their background in French, including classes taken, standardized test scores, and/or other exposure to the language. She will reply with further instructions about obtaining a consent code for the appropriate language course.
  • For more information about level placement, enrollment in ROMS courses, or the language requirement, please visit our FAQs page.
FREN 10A Beginning French

(1) M,W,Th,F 9:00–9:50, Harder

For students with little or no knowledge of French language. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

What do Montréal, Paris, and Dakar have in common? What are the rules regarding how many times one kisses a friend on the cheeks? Why is France called l’Hexagone? Learners discover the basics of French language and culture while speaking, listening, reading, and writing about everyday situations in France and Francophone countries.

 

FREN 20B Continuing French

(1) M,W,Th,F 10:00–10:50, Voiret

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in FREN 10a or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

How does the attitude of a French student toward family and strangers differ from the experience of an American student? How do the French view work and vacation? Learners will deepen their knowledge of French and Francophone cultures while expanding their ability to speak, read, listen, and write in French.

FREN 32A Intermediate French: Conversation

(1) M,W,Th,F 9:00–9:50, Theobald
(2) M,W,Th,F 11:00–11:50, Theobald

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in FREN 20b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

Did you study French in the past and need more speaking and writing practice plus a grammar review? This Intermediate French class is for you!  Exploring social “controversies” like sexism and globalization, it focuses on essential communication skills such as comprehension, contemporary vocabulary use, and conversational practice. Our materials include videos, music, websites, articles, and short stories.

FREN 104B Advanced Language Skills through Culture

(1) M,W,Th 10:00–10:50, Harder

Prerequisite: A 30-level FREN course or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

Students advance their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills, while focusing on key elements of French and Francophone cultures. Through the study of films, comics, current events, and cultural comparisons, we explore the ways in which French speakers' perceptions of time and history, as well as space and nature differ from our own. We also examine currents in contemporary French and Francophone youth cultures.

FREN 105A France Today: French Conversation

(1) M,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Theobald

Prerequisite: FREN 104b, or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

Improve your speaking skills while learning about and discussing socio–cultural issues that distinguish the French view of the world from that of Americans. Students will focus on expressing themselves better orally while continuing their work on reading, listening, and writing.

FREN 106B Writing Workshop

(1) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, Voiret

Prerequisite: FREN 105a, or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above). [DL; WI]

Innovative strategies and online tools enable students to improve their creative and analytical writing skills. Students examine different types of texts, exploring their literary style, determining their authority, and exploring how words and images may move and manipulate readers and viewers.

 

Upper-Level Courses (above FREN 106)

FREN 110A Cultural Representations

poster for FREN 110 with exactly the same text as in adjacent description on website(1) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, Fauré-Bellaïche

Prerequisite: FREN 106b, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

Topic for fall 2020: The Modern Family in the French and Francophone World.

This class looks at how novels, poems, films and other forms of cultural representations reflect larger social questions throughout the French-speaking world.  Texts and films by modern and contemporary French and Francophone writers and directors, including Emmanuel Carrère, Céline Sciamma, Marjane Satrapi, Nathacha Appanah, Annie Ernaux, and Catherine Cusset.

FREN 142B City and the Book

poster for FREN 142 with exactly the same text as in adjacent description on website(1) M,W 2:00–3:20, Randall

Prerequisite: FREN 106b, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. [COML Lit Course in a Language Other than English; ECS Courses in European Literature; WI]

Analyzes the symbolic appearance of the city in French literature and film from the Middle Ages to the present day. The representation of the city in literature and film is contextualized in theoretical writings of urbanists and philosophers. Literary texts include medieval fabliaux, Pantagruel (Rabelais) and Nana (Zola) as well as theoretical texts by Descartes, Ledoux, Le Corbusier, Salvador Dalí, and Paul Virilio.

FREN 153A Food and Identity in the French and Francophone World

poster for FREN 153 with exactly the same text as in adjacent description on website(1) M,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Fauré-Bellaïche

Prerequisite: FREN 106b, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

Why in France is food so intertwined with national identity? This course apprehends French and Francophone culture by thinking with food - its connections with identity, power, gender, social distinction and aesthetics. Foodwriting, films, literary texts, articles by major cultural historians are studied.

FREN 186B Literature and Politics

poster for FREN 186 with exactly the same text as in adjacent description on website(1) M,W 3:30–4:50, Randall

Prerequisite: FREN 106b, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.


We will be interested in how the literary is political and the political literary. We will organize the class around the relationship of the individual and the community. Texts include: Montaigne’s Essais, Corneille’s Horace, Genet’s Les nègres, Arendt’s What is Politics?, Dumont’s Essays on Individualism, Fanon’s Peau noire, masques blancs.

 

Cross-listed with French and Francophone Studies

ECS 100A European Cultural Studies Proseminar: Modernism

(1) M,W 2:00–3:20, Dowden

Explores the interrelationship of literature, music, painting, philosophy, and other arts in the era of high modernism. Works by Artaud, Baudelaire, Benjamin, Mann, Mahler, Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Kandinsky, Schiele, Beckett, Brecht, Adorno, Sartre, Heidegger, and others.

HUM/UWS 1A Tragedy: Love & Death in the Creative Imagination

(1) M,W,Th 9:00–9:50, Burt/Dowden

Enrollment limited to Humanities Fellows.

How do you turn catastrophe into art - and why? This first-year seminar in the humanities addresses such elemental questions, especially those centering on love and death. How does literature catch hold of catastrophic experiences and make them intelligible or even beautiful? Should misery even be beautiful? By exploring the tragic tradition in literature across many eras, cultures, genres, and languages, this course looks for basic patterns.