Courses

For a full list of courses offered next semester, download the PDF brochure: French and Francophone Studies Course Offerings Spring 2022.

For a short introduction to each of our course offerings or language levels, click on the course title below.

Language Courses

All students need permission to enroll in French Language Courses (FREN 10-106).  Interested students should place themselves on the waitlist. These courses have an enrollment limit of 0 so that we can place students into the right level. If you have any questions, please contact Prof. Harder.

  • Students currently enrolled in FREN language courses (FREN 10-105) will receive instructions about permission requests before the beginning of registration.
  • All others should email Professor Harder as soon as possible with a description of their background in French, including classes taken, standardized test scores, and/or other exposure to the language. She will reply with further instructions about obtaining permission for the appropriate language course.
  • For more information about level placement, enrollment in ROMS courses, or the language requirement, please visit our FAQs page.

(1) M,T,W,Th 9:00–9:50 AM, Niehaus (in-person)

For students with little or no knowledge of French language. Permission required (please see instructions above).

What do Montréal, Paris, and Dakar have in common? What are the rules regarding how many times one kisses a friend on the cheeks? Why is France called l’Hexagone? Learners discover the basics of French language and culture while speaking, listening, reading, and writing about everyday situations in France and Francophone countries.

(1) M,T,W,Th 10:00–10:50 AM, Niehaus (in-person)

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in FREN 10a or the equivalent. Permission required (please see instructions above).

How does the attitude of a French student toward family and strangers differ from the experience of an American student? How do the French view work and vacation? Learners will deepen their knowledge of French and Francophone cultures while expanding their ability to speak, read, listen, and write in French.

(1) M,T,W,Th 9:00–9:50 AM, Theobald (in-person)
(2) M,T,W,Th 10:00–10:50 AM, Theobald (in-person)

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in FREN 20b or the equivalent. Permission required (please see instructions above).

Did you study French in the past and need more speaking and writing practice plus a grammar review? This Intermediate French class is for you!  Exploring social “controversies” like sexism and globalization, it focuses on essential communication skills such as comprehension, contemporary vocabulary use, and conversational practice. Our materials include videos, music, websites, articles, and short stories.

(1) M,W,Th 11:00–11:50 AM, Harder (in-person)

Prerequisite: A 30-level FREN course or the equivalent. Permission required (please see instructions above).

Students advance their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills, while focusing on key elements of French and Francophone cultures. Through the study of films, comics, current events, and cultural comparisons, we explore the ways in which French speakers’ perceptions of time and history, as well as space and nature differ from our own. We also examine issues of globalization in the Francophone world.

(1) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50 PM, Theobald (in-person)

Prerequisite: FREN 104b, or the equivalent. Permission required (please see instructions above).

Improve your speaking skills while learning about and discussing socio–cultural issues that distinguish the French view of the world from that of Americans. Students will focus on expressing themselves better orally while continuing their work on reading, listening, and writing.

(1) M,W,Th 1:00–1:50 PM, Harder (in-person)

Prerequisite: FREN 105a, or the equivalent. Permission required (please see instructions above). [DL; WI]

Innovative strategies and online tools enable students to improve their creative and analytical writing skills. Students examine different types of texts, exploring their literary style, determining their authority, and exploring how words and images may move and manipulate readers and viewers.

 

Upper-Level Courses (above FREN 106)

poster for FREN 111. image of French flag in background. image of Ivorian opposition supporters protest during a rally ahead of the referendum in Abidjian. text reads same as description on this page.
FREN 111A The Republic

(1) M,W 2:00–3:20 PM, Randall (in-person)

Prerequisite: FREN 106b, equivalent, or permission of instructor. [OC; Cross-listed with COML, IGS, ECS, HOI, & POL]

The “Republic” analyzes how the republican ideal of the citizen devoid of religious, ethnic, or gender identity has fared in different Francophone political milieux. Course involves understanding how political institutions such as constitutions, parliaments, and court systems interact with reality of modern societies in which religious, ethnic, and gender identities play important roles.

poster for FREN 125. image of water landscape and map of mediterranean. text reads same as description on this page.
FREN 125B Mediterranean Crossings

(1) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50 PM, Fauré-Bellaïche (in-person)

Prerequisite: FREN 106b, equivalent, or permission of instructor. [Cross-listed with IGS]


Navigating French and Francophone literature and film, we will explore the Mediterranean as a transnational space of multiple circulations, migrations, and cultural crossings in works by Lebanese, Algerian, Moroccan, Tunisian, Greek, Romanian and French writers and filmmakers.

poster for FREN 129. image of protest in France. text reads same as description on this page.
FREN 129A La Révolution tranquille?: Québec's Culture Wars on Stage and Screen

(1) T,Th 2:00–3:20 PM, Theobald (in-person)

Prerequisite: FREN 106b, equivalent, or permission of instructor.

Considers the plays and films of the last sixty years that have probed the tensions at the heart of québécois culture to provide a violent counterpart to the sexual, political, and generational "Révolution tranquille" of the 1960's and 1970's.

 

Taught by French and Francophone Faculty

poster for IGS 110. image of je suis charlie protest. text reads same as description on this page.
IGS 110A Religion and Secularism in French & Francophone Culture

(1) M,W,Th 11:00–11:50AM, Fauré-Bellaïche (in-person)

[Cross-listed with FREN and SOC]

Tackles the persistent power of religion in France and its former colonies despite common ideals of secular nationalism. Through literature and film we will study the historical and contemporary cultural wars waged around the French notion of “laïcité” -- its confrontation with Islam, but also the experiences of Jews, Catholics, and Protestants.

poster for COML 123. image result for Wong kar wai's In the The Mood for Love. text reads same as description on this page.
COML 123A Perfect Love?

(1) M,W 3:30–4:50 PM, Randall (in-person)

[Cross-listed with ECS, HOI, and MERS]

See how some of the greatest writers (Boccaccio, Hawthorne, Marguerite de Navarre) film makers (Wong Kar-wai and Di Sica), and composers (Monteverdi) have treated a problem that almost everyone knows too well:  how the all too-common desire to achieve "perfect love" all too-often ends up on the rocks.