Courses

Notes about fall 2021 ROMS courses:

For a full list of courses offered next semester, download the PDF brochure: French and Francophone Studies Course Offerings Fall 2021.

For a short introduction to each of our course offerings or language levels, click on the course title below.

Language Courses

All students need permission to enroll in French Language Courses (FREN 10-106). They will appear to have an enrollment limit of 0 in WorkDay. Enrollment in these courses is processed via Wait List management by the Department Administrator and Director of the Language Program.

  • Students currently enrolled in FREN language courses (FREN 10-105) will receive instructions about permission requests before the beginning of registration.
  • All others should email Professor Harder as soon as possible with a description of their background in French, including classes taken, standardized test scores, and/or other exposure to the language. She will reply with further instructions about obtaining permission for the appropriate language course.
  • For more information about level placement, enrollment in ROMS courses, or the language requirement, please visit our FAQs page.

(1) M,T,W,Th 8:00 AM–9:30 AM, Harder (in-person)

For students with little or no knowledge of French language. Permission required (please see instructions above).

What do Montréal, Paris, and Dakar have in common? What are the rules regarding how many times one kisses a friend on the cheeks? Why is France called l’Hexagone? Learners discover the basics of French language and culture while speaking, listening, reading, and writing about everyday situations in France and Francophone countries.

(1) M,T,W,Th 10:00 AM–11:30 AM, Nenciu (hybrid)

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in FREN 10a or the equivalent. Permission required (please see instructions above).

How does the attitude of a French student toward family and strangers differ from the experience of an American student? How do the French view work and vacation? Learners will deepen their knowledge of French and Francophone cultures while expanding their ability to speak, read, listen, and write in French.

(1) M,T,W,Th 10:00 AM–11:30 AM, Theobald (in-person)
(2) M,T,W,Th 12:00 PM–1:30 PM, Theobald (in-person)

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in FREN 20b or the equivalent. Permission required (please see instructions above).

Did you study French in the past and need more speaking and writing practice plus a grammar review? This Intermediate French class is for you!  Exploring social “controversies” like sexism and globalization, it focuses on essential communication skills such as comprehension, contemporary vocabulary use, and conversational practice. Our materials include videos, music, websites, articles, and short stories.

(1) M,W 12:00 PM–1:30 PM, Harder (in-person)

Prerequisite: A 30-level FREN course or the equivalent. Permission required (please see instructions above).

Students advance their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills, while focusing on key elements of French and Francophone cultures. Through the study of films, comics, current events, and cultural comparisons, we explore the ways in which French speakers' perceptions of time and history, as well as space and nature differ from our own. We also examine issues of globalization in the Francophone world.

(1) T,Th, 2:00 PM–3:30 PM, Theobald (in-person)

Prerequisite: FREN 104b, or the equivalent. Permission required (please see instructions above).

Improve your speaking skills while learning about and discussing socio–cultural issues that distinguish the French view of the world from that of Americans. Students will focus on expressing themselves better orally while continuing their work on reading, listening, and writing.

(1) M,W 10:00 AM–11:30 AM, Fauré-Bellaïche (in-person)

Prerequisite: FREN 105a, or the equivalent. Permission required (please see instructions above). [DL; WI]

Innovative strategies and online tools enable students to improve their creative and analytical writing skills. Students examine different types of texts, exploring their literary style, determining their authority, and exploring how words and images may move and manipulate readers and viewers.

 

Upper-Level Courses (above FREN 106)

FREN 110A Cultural Representations, Special Topic: The Modern Family in the French & Francophone World. Below the title are four images arranged in two rows. The first image is an image from the film L’Adversaire, based on the crimes of Jean-Claude Romand. It takes place in a kitchen where a seated, dark-haired man serves a meal to two children, a boy about 5 and a girl about 10 years old. To the right stands presumably their mother in an apron with a frying pan in her left hand. The next photo is a close-up photo of what looks to be a mother and her daughter of about 12 sitting against the headboard of a bed. They are both blond and are looking at each other and smiling. The girl is fingering her orange beads. In the bottom left black and white photo are two women, one older who has a dog in her arms, and to the left of her a younger woman perhaps in her 30’s. Both are wearing light-colored skirts. They are standing in front of the open door of a traditional home with white stucco with wooden slats. There is a window to the left of the door with curtains and three flower pots in front of it although there is little growing in the pots besides perhaps a few sprigs of herbs.  This photo is from Littérature et sociologie, des liens féconds. It looks as if it were taken around the time of WWII. The last image is an undated illustration provided courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics shows Marjane, center, as she listens to Siamek, second from left, from the film "Persepolis." (AP Photo/Sony Pictures Classics). In a text box at the bottom of the poster between the two bottom photos on a yellow-cream background continues the description of the course: Prof. Clémentine Fauré-Bellaïche, Prerequisite: FREN 106b, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.This class looks at how novels, poems, films and other forms of cultural representations reflect larger social questions throughout the French-speaking world. Texts and films by modern and contemporary French and Francophone writers and directors, including Emmanuel Carrère, Céline Sciamma, Marjane Satrapi, Nathacha Appanah, Annie Ernaux, and Catherine Cusset.
FREN 110A Cultural Representations

(1) M,W 12:00 PM–1:30 PM, Fauré-Bellaïche (in-person)

Prerequisite: FREN 106b, equivalent, or permission of instructor. [OC; Cross-listed with COML, IGS, ECS]

This class looks at how novels, poems, films and other forms of cultural representations reflect larger social questions throughout the French-speaking world.  Texts and films by modern and contemporary French and Francophone writers and directors, including Emmanuel Carrère, Céline Sciamma, Marjane Satrapi, Nathacha Appanah, Annie Ernaux, and Catherine Cusset.

FREN 122B Michael Randall SALAMANDERS AND SONNETS: Art, Power, and Identity in the French Renaissance Prerequisite: FREN 106b, equivalent, or permission of instructor. [WI; Cross-listed with COML, ECS, MERS] This class will look at how forms of cultural expression--from architecture to sonnets and odes--were used to create a sense of national and personal identity in the French Renaissance. We will look at how the poems, novellas, and essays of authors such as Joachim Du Bellay, Pierre de Ronsard, Marguerite de Navarre, Louise Labé, and Michel de Montaigne, the paintings and sculptures of artists like François Clouet and Francesco Primaticcio, and the buildings of architects like Philibert Delorme, were used to produce new forms of national and personal identity in the 16th century. We will also refer to modern authors such as Edouard Glissant to help us understand these developments from a modern point of view. Center image: "Chronologie ou tableau synoptique," Bibliothèque Sainte Geneviève, Paris, ms. 523. Photo: Edouard Glissant, Daniel Mordzinski, 1993, Carrefour des Litteratures Europeennés, Strasbourg Parlement International des Écrivains.
FREN 122B Toads, Salamanders, and Sonnets: Art, Power, and Identity in the French Renaissance

(1) T,Th 2:00 PM–3:30 PM, Randall (in-person)

Prerequisite: FREN 106b, equivalent, or permission of instructor. [WI; Cross-listed with COML, ECS, MERS]

This class will look at how forms of cultural expression--from architecture to sonnets and odes--were used to create a sense of national and personal identity in the French Renaissance. We will look at how the poems, novellas, and essays of authors such as Joachim Du Bellay, Pierre de Ronsard, Marguerite de Navarre, Louise Labé, and Michel de Montaigne, the paintings and sculptures of artists like François Clouet and Francesco Primaticcio, and the buildings of architects like Philibert Delorme, were used to produce new forms of national and personal identity in the 16th century. We will also refer to modern authors such as Edouard Glissant to help us understand these developments from a modern point of view.

poster for FREN 151. text reads: FREN 151b Francophone Identities in a Global World: An Introduction to Francophone Literature. Professor Clémentine Fauré-Bellaïche. Prerequisite: FREN 106b or the equivalent, or permission of instructor. Introduces Francophone literature and film, retracing, through the works of great contemporary Francophone writers and directors, the evolution of the Francophone world, from the colonial struggles to the transcultural and transnational trajectories of our global era.

(1) M,W 2:00 PM–3:30 PM, Fauré-Bellaïche (in-person)

Prerequisite: FREN 106b, equivalent, or permission of instructor. [WI; Cross-listed with HOI]

Introduces Francophone literature and film, retracing, through the works of great contemporary Francophone writers and directors, the evolution of the Francophone world, from the colonial struggles to the transcultural and transnational trajectories of our global era.

A montage of French identity cards, FREN 161A, The Enigma of Being Oneself: From Du Bellay to Laferrière, Professor Randall Prerequisite: FREN 106b or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. This class explores the relationship of identity formation and modern individualism in texts by writers working in France, Francophone Africa and Canada.  Authors range from modern and contemporary writers like Romain Gary, Dany Laferrière, Achille Mbembe, Alain Mabanckou, and Edouard Glissant to early-modern writers like Joachim Du Bellay and Michel de Montaigne. This course counts for the Difference and Justice in the World (DJW) and Writing Intensive (WI) requirements and is cross-listed with IGS.
FREN 161A The Enigma of Being Oneself: from Du Bellay to Laferrière

(1) T,Th 4:00 PM–5:30 PM, Randall (in-person)

Prerequisite: FREN 106b, equivalent, or permission of instructor. [WI, DJW; Cross-listed with IGS]

Explores the relationship of identity formation and modern individualism in texts by writers working in France, Francophone Africa and Canada. Authors range from modern and contemporary writers Romain Gary, Dany Laferrière, Achille Mbembe, Alain Mabanckou, and Edouard Glissant to early-modern writers like Joachim Du Bellay and Michel de Montaigne.

Cross-listed with French and Francophone Studies

poster for ECS 100. image of a brown/black pipe at the top. text below it reads: This is not a pipe. Leci n’est pas une pipe. And this is not a seminar. European Cultural Studies Proseminar: Modernism. [hum, wi] Professor Stephen Dowden. T,Th 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM.
ECS 100A European Cultural Studies Proseminar: Modernism

[DL,OC; Cross-listed with HOI, ENG, COML ,MUS, GER]

(1) T,Th 4:00 PM–5:30 PM, Dowden (in-person)

Explores the interrelationship of literature, music, painting, philosophy, and other arts in the era of high modernism. Works by Artaud, Baudelaire, Benjamin, Mann, Mahler, Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Kandinsky, Schiele, Beckett, Brecht, Adorno, Sartre, Heidegger, and others.