Courses

NOTES ABOUT FALL 2020 ROMS COURSES

ROMS would like to provide some clarifications so that you can plan your schedule and make any adjustments, as appropriate, when registration reopens via Sage.

  • No ROMS classes are completely asynchronous (that is, with no determined meeting time). Thus, you cannot enroll in two courses for which the block times overlap. Accommodations will be provided to those students who, for exceptional reasons, cannot attend class meetings synchronously. Please contact the professor directly to discuss accommodations.

  • While most classes will be scheduled to meet twice per week for 90 minutes (either Monday and Wednesday, or Tuesday and Thursday), language-level courses (numbered 10-30) will be scheduled four times per week, but students will not meet for the full 90 minutes each day. These longer blocks are meant to accommodate cleaning protocols, smaller groups if needed, longer sessions vs shorter sessions, or office hours, according to instructor’s modalities but will not impact the actual contact hours required for the class.
  • ALL students (on- and off-campus) are welcome to enroll in ROMS courses, regardless of its mode of instruction, which are listed below in more detail.
ROMS Modes of Instruction:
  • Offered in-person:

    In-person classes are designed for students to participate in a safe, physically distanced classroom, but will accommodate students remotely (online) who are unable to participate in-person. In addition, all faculty will need to be prepared to enable the remote participation of students who cannot attend in-person for a period of time, due to unplanned events such as the need to quarantine due to exposure or to isolate due to illness.


  • Offered in a hybrid mode, a combination of in-person and remote (online) instruction:
    Hybrid courses are a combination of in-person and remote (online) class sessions. These courses are open both to students located off-campus connecting remotely and to students located on campus able to attend classes in a classroom. Some hybrid courses may also include asynchronous elements.
  • Offered remotely:

    Remote courses are offered online synchronously (held at a particular time, say, on Zoom). Some courses may also include asynchronous elements.

For a full list of courses offered next semester, download the PDF brochure (coming soon).

Language Courses

All students need a consent code to enroll in French Language Courses (FREN 10-106).

  • Students currently enrolled in FREN language courses (FREN 10-105) will receive instructions about consent code distribution before the beginning of registration.
  • All others should email Professor Harder as soon as possible with a description of their background in French, including classes taken, standardized test scores, and/or other exposure to the language. She will reply with further instructions about obtaining a consent code for the appropriate language course.
  • For more information about level placement, enrollment in ROMS courses, or the language requirement, please visit our FAQs page.
FREN 10A Beginning French

(1) Harder

Instruction for this course will be offered in a hybrid combination of in person and remote sessions, which may vary by course and over the duration of the semester. Enrollment is open to students who will be on campus and students who will be studying remotely up to the enrollment limit. Class meets for 55 minutes 3 days per week during the assigned block, plus group meetings for 35 minutes on the 4th day during the assigned block.

For students with little or no knowledge of French language. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

What do Montréal, Paris, and Dakar have in common? What are the rules regarding how many times one kisses a friend on the cheeks? Why is France called l’Hexagone? Learners discover the basics of French language and culture while speaking, listening, reading, and writing about everyday situations in France and Francophone countries.

 

FREN 20B Continuing French

(1) Voiret

Instruction for this course will be offered remotely. Meeting times for this course are listed in the schedule of classes (in EST). Class meets for 50 minutes 4 days per week during the assigned block.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in FREN 10a or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

How does the attitude of a French student toward family and strangers differ from the experience of an American student? How do the French view work and vacation? Learners will deepen their knowledge of French and Francophone cultures while expanding their ability to speak, read, listen, and write in French.

FREN 32A Intermediate French: Conversation

(1) Theobald

Instruction for this course will be offered in a hybrid combination of in person and remote sessions, which may vary by course and over the duration of the semester. Enrollment is open to students who will be on campus and students who will be studying remotely up to the enrollment limit. Class meets for 50 minutes 4 days per week during the assigned block.

(2) Theobald

Instruction for this course will be offered in a hybrid combination of in person and remote sessions, which may vary by course and over the duration of the semester. Enrollment is open to students who will be on campus and students who will be studying remotely up to the enrollment limit. Class meets for 50 minutes 4 days per week during the assigned block.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in FREN 20b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

Did you study French in the past and need more speaking and writing practice plus a grammar review? This Intermediate French class is for you!  Exploring social “controversies” like sexism and globalization, it focuses on essential communication skills such as comprehension, contemporary vocabulary use, and conversational practice. Our materials include videos, music, websites, articles, and short stories.

FREN 104B Advanced Language Skills through Culture

(1) Harder

Instruction for this course will be offered in a hybrid combination of in person and remote sessions, which may vary by course and over the duration of the semester. Enrollment is open to students who will be on campus and students who will be studying remotely up to the enrollment limit.

Prerequisite: A 30-level FREN course or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

Students advance their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills, while focusing on key elements of French and Francophone cultures. Through the study of films, comics, current events, and cultural comparisons, we explore the ways in which French speakers' perceptions of time and history, as well as space and nature differ from our own. We also examine currents in contemporary French and Francophone youth cultures.

FREN 105A France Today: French Conversation

(1) Theobald

Instruction for this course will be offered in a hybrid combination of in person and remote sessions, which may vary by course and over the duration of the semester. Enrollment is open to students who will be on campus and students who will be studying remotely up to the enrollment limit.

Prerequisite: FREN 104b, or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

Improve your speaking skills while learning about and discussing socio–cultural issues that distinguish the French view of the world from that of Americans. Students will focus on expressing themselves better orally while continuing their work on reading, listening, and writing.

FREN 106B Writing Workshop

(1) Voiret

Instruction for this course will be offered remotely. Meeting times for this course are listed in the schedule of classes (in EST). 

Prerequisite: FREN 105a, or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above). [DL; WI]

Innovative strategies and online tools enable students to improve their creative and analytical writing skills. Students examine different types of texts, exploring their literary style, determining their authority, and exploring how words and images may move and manipulate readers and viewers.

 

Upper-Level Courses (above FREN 106)

FREN 110A Cultural Representations

This poster begins with the course’s title,  FREN 110A Cultural Representations, Special Topic: The Modern Family in the French & Francophone World. Below the title are four images arranged in two rows. The first image is an image from the film L’Adversaire, based on the crimes of Jean-Claude Romand. It takes place in a kitchen where a seated, dark-haired man serves a meal to two children, a boy about 5 and a girl about 10 years old. To the right stands presumably their mother in an apron with a frying pan in her left hand. The next photo from https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-41ySjNdbL5k/Tr6uOlsTGRI/AAAAAAAAOn4/d2P3bgxzsLU/s400/05.jpg is a close-up photo of what looks to be a mother and her daughter of about 12 sitting against the headboard of a bed. They are both blond and are looking at each other and smiling. The girl is fingering her orange beads. In the bottom left black and white photo are two women, one older who has a dog in her arms, and to the left of her a younger woman perhaps in her 30’s. Both are wearing light-colored skirts. They are standing in front of the open door of a traditional home with white stucco with wooden slats. There is a window to the left of the door with curtains and three flower pots in front of it although there is little growing in the pots besides perhaps a few sprigs of herbs.  This photo is from Littérature et sociologie, des liens féconds. It looks as if it were taken around the time of WWII. The last image is an undated illustration provided courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics shows Marjane, center, as she listens to Siamek, second from left, from the film "Persepolis." (AP Photo/Sony Pictures Classics). In a text box at the bottom of the poster between the two bottom photos on a yellow-cream background continues the description of the course: Prof. Clémentine Fauré-Bellaïche, Prerequisite: FREN 106b, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.This class looks at how novels, poems, films and other forms of cultural representations reflect larger social questions throughout the French-speaking world. Texts and films by modern and contemporary French and Francophone writers and directors, including Emmanuel Carrère, Céline Sciamma, Marjane Satrapi, Nathacha Appanah, Annie Ernaux, and Catherine Cusset.(1) Fauré-Bellaïche

Instruction for this course will be offered remotely. Meeting times for this course are listed in the schedule of classes (in EST).

Prerequisite: FREN 106b, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

Topic for fall 2020: The Modern Family in the French and Francophone World.

This class looks at how novels, poems, films and other forms of cultural representations reflect larger social questions throughout the French-speaking world.  Texts and films by modern and contemporary French and Francophone writers and directors, including Emmanuel Carrère, Céline Sciamma, Marjane Satrapi, Nathacha Appanah, Annie Ernaux, and Catherine Cusset.

FREN 142B City and the Book

The background of this image is black with semi-transparent line drawings of two cityscapes. The top one is of a medieval walled city; the bottom is a modern city with broad avenues and tall buildings that continue above the picture frame. In front of the background image are two full-color images, one a medieval painting of a group of people. Coming out of a castle entrance is a man wearing a gold heavy brocaded coat on a brown horse in decorated comparison accompanied by a dog in cape matching the horse’s comparison. He is followed by group of soldiers who are under the arch of the exit from the castle. Coming towards the first group is a young woman on a white horse wearing a long red dress and a medieval cone hat.  The second image is the front of the book, by Zola, Nana, Édition d’Henri Mitterand, folio Classique. On its cover is the naked torso of a woman lying on a pillow with her arms raised, one cradling her dark hair . I believe it is a painting by Modigliani. At the top right is a description of the course.  FREN 142B:  CITY AND THE BOOK, Michael Randall,  Prerequisite:  FREN 106b, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor, COML Lit Course in a Language Other than English; ECS Courses in European Literature; Writing Intensive. Analyzes the symbolic appearance of the city in French literature and film from the Middle Ages to the present day. The representation of the city in literature and film is contextualized in theoretical writings of urbanists and philosophers. Literary texts include medieval fabliaux, Pantagruel (Rabelais) and Nana (Zola) as well as theoretical texts by Descartes, Ledoux, Le Corbusier, Salvador Dalí, and Paul Virilio.(1) Randall

Instruction for this course will be offered in a hybrid combination of in person and remote sessions, which may vary by course and over the duration of the semester. Enrollment is open to students who will be on campus and students who will be studying remotely up to the enrollment limit.

Prerequisite: FREN 106b, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. [COML Lit Course in a Language Other than English; ECS Courses in European Literature; WI]

Analyzes the symbolic appearance of the city in French literature and film from the Middle Ages to the present day. The representation of the city in literature and film is contextualized in theoretical writings of urbanists and philosophers. Literary texts include medieval fabliaux, Pantagruel (Rabelais) and Nana (Zola) as well as theoretical texts by Descartes, Ledoux, Le Corbusier, Salvador Dalí, and Paul Virilio.

FREN 153A Food and Identity in the French and Francophone World

FREN 153a At the top of this poster is the title of the course, FREN 153A Food and Identity in the French and Francophone World, Prof. Clémentine Fauré-Bellaïche, followed by 5 images. The first is a Renoir painting: https://fr.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fichier:Pierre-Auguste_Renoir_-_Luncheon_of_the_Boating_Party_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg. This is a picture of a festive group of diners who gather under a tent awning with open sides. The front most group huddles around a table with a linen table cloth, wine bottles and glasses, fruit, crumpled-up napkins. Two women in black dresses with white collars and decorated hats sit with one man in a straw hat and tee-shirt sitting backwards on his chair. Behind the woman on the left stands another man in tee-shirt and straw hat who is looking towards another group of revelers at back of picture. Another man who is hatless leans closely over the other woman and looks down at her.  Behind the front group is another table with a man and a woman. Another woman with a straw hat leans against a railing. She is gazing forewords and seems to be gazing and a seated man whose back is to us but looks towards her. Even further back are two men talking and maybe smoking. One wears a top hat. Another group of three are in deep conversation to the right of the painting. Below this is another painting, Petit déjeuner de Louis XIV avec Molière, by Jean-Léon Gérôme, 1863. Two groups watch as the king and Molière eat breakfast. Two men bow to the king who looks sideways at them. They are part of a crowd of about ten onlookers in the ornate hall, with huge paintings and highly decorated walls. Behind Molière and the dining table to the right are the servants. One carries a tray with wine and glasses. Everyone is dressed in high Louis XIV fashion,   (http://heraldie.blogspot.com/2014/03/le-roi-louis-xiv-table.html).  To the right lower part of poster is a modern-day representation of Marie-Antoinette lying  on an ornate chaise longue. She acts exhausted and a servant in black and white is about to remove one of her pink shoes. On the table in the back are 12 various sizes of decadent cakes and pastries, decorated with red betties and whipped cream and glazes on pedestal serving plates. To the queen’s left is another 4-tiered cake, https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-marie-antoinette-diet. Above this photo, at the right of the poster is a print of a water-color for Franco-Vietnamese Banh-Mi, Banh Mi recipe illustration, showing something that looks like a big sandwich with the individual ingredients around it, https://www.pinterest.com/pin/146015212894312633/. The last image is in the center under the title of the course. It is a pre-dinner scene. The plates and glasses are empty. 12 men and women in their 20s or 30s sit around the table in deep discussion. This image comes from the film,La graine et le mulet: https://www.forumdesimages.fr/les-programmes/manger/la-graine-et-le-mulet_1 Below the 5 images is the description of the course:  Prerequisite: FREN 106b, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Why in France is food so intertwined with national identity? This course apprehends French and Francophone culture by thinking with food - its connections with identity, power, gender, social distinction and aesthetics. Foodwriting, films, literary texts, articles by major cultural historians are studied.(1) Fauré-Bellaïche

Instruction for this course will be offered remotely. Meeting times for this course are listed in the schedule of classes (in EST).

Prerequisite: FREN 106b, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

Why in France is food so intertwined with national identity? This course apprehends French and Francophone culture by thinking with food - its connections with identity, power, gender, social distinction and aesthetics. Foodwriting, films, literary texts, articles by major cultural historians are studied.

FREN 186B Literature and Politics

At the top of this poster which has a black background and white lettering is a close-up photo of the face and neck of an Afro-American woman. The very left part of her face is beyond the rectangle. She is young and very beautiful. Her hair is short and she wears one pearl earring. Her eyes are closed. Over the lower part of her face and one eye, eyebrow and part of her forehead is a thin, plastic or rubber white face which is peeling off. Her right hand holds part of the mask on or perhaps rather it is held to her face in an expression of despair or sadness. Below the photo is its credit: Face Reality (Female), Laurie Cooper, Fine Art Print (22” x 27”). Below that, is the description of the course: FREN 186B, LITERATURE AND POLITICS, Michael Randall, Prerequisite: FREN 106b or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. We will be interested in how the literary is political and the political literary. We will organize the class around the relationship of the individual and the community. Texts include: Montaigne’s Essais, Corneille’s Horace, Genet’s Les nègres, Arendt’s What is Politics?, Dumont’s Essays on Individualism, Fanon’s Peau noire, masques blancs. (1) Randall

Instruction for this course will be offered in a hybrid combination of in person and remote sessions, which may vary by course and over the duration of the semester. Enrollment is open to students who will be on campus and students who will be studying remotely up to the enrollment limit.

Prerequisite: FREN 106b, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

We will be interested in how the literary is political and the political literary. We will organize the class around the relationship of the individual and the community. Texts include: Montaigne’s Essais, Corneille’s Horace, Genet’s Les nègres, Arendt’s What is Politics?, Dumont’s Essays on Individualism, Fanon’s Peau noire, masques blancs.

 

Cross-listed with French and Francophone Studies

HUM/UWS 1A Tragedy: Love & Death in the Creative Imagination

(1) Burt/Dowden

Instruction for this course will be offered in-person. Meeting times for this course are listed in the schedule of classes (in EST).

Enrollment limited to Humanities Fellows.

How do you turn catastrophe into art - and why? This first-year seminar in the humanities addresses such elemental questions, especially those centering on love and death. How does literature catch hold of catastrophic experiences and make them intelligible or even beautiful? Should misery even be beautiful? By exploring the tragic tradition in literature across many eras, cultures, genres, and languages, this course looks for basic patterns.