Courses

NOTES ABOUT FALL 2020 ROMS COURSES

ROMS would like to provide some clarifications so that you can plan your schedule and make any adjustments, as appropriate, when registration reopens via Sage.

  • No ROMS classes are completely asynchronous (that is, with no determined meeting time). Thus, you cannot enroll in two courses for which the block times overlap. Accommodations will be provided to those students who, for exceptional reasons, cannot attend class meetings synchronously. Please contact the professor directly to discuss accommodations.

  • While most classes will be scheduled to meet twice per week for 90 minutes (either Monday and Wednesday, or Tuesday and Thursday), language-level courses (numbered 10-30) will be scheduled four times per week, but students will not meet for the full 90 minutes each day. These longer blocks are meant to accommodate cleaning protocols, smaller groups if needed, longer sessions vs shorter sessions, or office hours, according to instructor’s modalities but will not impact the actual contact hours required for the class.
  • ALL students (on- and off-campus) are welcome to enroll in ROMS courses, regardless of its mode of instruction, which are listed below in more detail.
ROMS Modes of Instruction:
  • Offered in-person:

    In-person classes are designed for students to participate in a safe, physically distanced classroom, but will accommodate students remotely (online) who are unable to participate in-person. In addition, all faculty will need to be prepared to enable the remote participation of students who cannot attend in-person for a period of time, due to unplanned events such as the need to quarantine due to exposure or to isolate due to illness.


  • Offered in a hybrid mode, a combination of in-person and remote (online) instruction:
    Hybrid courses are a combination of in-person and remote (online) class sessions. These courses are open both to students located off-campus connecting remotely and to students located on campus able to attend classes in a classroom. Some hybrid courses may also include asynchronous elements.
  • Offered remotely:

    Remote courses are offered online synchronously (held at a particular time, say, on Zoom). Some courses may also include asynchronous elements.

For full lists of courses offered next semester, download the PDF brochures:

For a short video introduction to each of our courses, click on the course title below.

Questions about major/minor requirements, course offerings, or studying abroad? Contact our Undergraduate Advising Head, Professor Lucía Reyes de Deu.

Language Courses

All students need a consent code to enroll in Spanish Language Courses (HISP 10-108).

  • Students currently enrolled in HISP language courses (HISP 10-105) will receive instructions about consent code distribution before the beginning of registration.
  • All others should email Professor Elena González Ros, Director of the Spanish language program, as soon as possible with a description of their background in Spanish, including classes taken, standardized test scores, and/or other exposure to the language. She will reply with further instructions about obtaining a consent code for the appropriate language course.
  • Heritage speakers (those who grew up speaking Spanish) should also describe their language background in an email to Professor Elena González Ros who will give them additional information.
  • For more information about level placement, enrollment in ROMS courses, or the language requirement, please visit our FAQs page.

(1) M,T,W,Th 8:00 AM–9:30 AM, Sewick

Instruction for this course will be offered remotely. Meeting times for this course are listed in the schedule of classes (in EST). Class meets for 50 minutes 4 days per week during the assigned block.

(2) M,T,W,Th 12:00 PM–1:30 PM, Sewick

Instruction for this course will be offered remotely. Meeting times for this course are listed in the schedule of classes (in EST). Class meets for 50 minutes 4 days per week during the assigned block.

Prerequisite: Consent code required (please see instructions above).

For students who have had no previous study of Spanish. An introduction to the Spanish language and culture, this course focuses on the acquisition of effective communication skills in Spanish and cultural awareness. Students will actively speak, write, listen, and read in the target language. A variety of media and texts relating to authentic familiar topics will be used. Active participation is essential.

(1) M,T,W,Th 10:00 AM–11:30 AM, Gould

Instruction for this course will be offered in a hybrid combination of in person and remote sessions, which may vary by course and over the duration of the semester. Enrollment is open to students who will be on campus and students who will be studying remotely up to the enrollment limit. Class meets for 50 minutes 4 days per week during the assigned block.

(2) M,T,W,Th 12:00 PM–1:30 PM, Gould

Instruction for this course will be offered in a hybrid combination of in person and remote sessions, which may vary by course and over the duration of the semester. Enrollment is open to students who will be on campus and students who will be studying remotely up to the enrollment limit. Class meets for 50 minutes 4 days per week during the assigned block.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 10a or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

For students with some previous study of Spanish. Students will continue the development of all language skills (speaking, reading, listening, writing, and culture) using a variety of media and texts relating to authentic familiar topics. The focus of the class is to communicate effectively and to learn more about the culture of the Spanish-speaking world. Active participation is essential.

(1) M,T,W,Th 8:00 AM–9:30 AM, Mederos

Instruction for this course will be offered remotely. Meeting times for this course are listed in the schedule of classes (in EST). Class meets for 50 minutes 4 days per week during the assigned block.

(2) M,T,W,Th 2:00 PM–3:30 PM, Turpin

Instruction for this course will be offered in a hybrid combination of in person and remote sessions, which may vary by course and over the duration of the semester. Enrollment is open to students who will be on campus and students who will be studying remotely up to the enrollment limit. Class meets for 50 minutes 4 days per week during the assigned block.

(3) M,T,W,Th 10:00 AM–11:30 AM, Turpin

Instruction for this course will be offered in a hybrid combination of in person and remote sessions, which may vary by course and over the duration of the semester. Enrollment is open to students who will be on campus and students who will be studying remotely up to the enrollment limit. Class meets for 50 minutes 4 days per week during the assigned block.

(4) M,T,W,Th 12:00 PM–1:30 PM, Turpin

Instruction for this course will be offered in a hybrid combination of in person and remote sessions, which may vary by course and over the duration of the semester. Enrollment is open to students who will be on campus and students who will be studying remotely up to the enrollment limit. Class meets for 50 minutes 4 days per week during the assigned block.

(5) M,T,W,Th 2:00 PM–3:30 PM, Gould

Instruction for this course will be offered in a hybrid combination of in person and remote sessions, which may vary by course and over the duration of the semester. Enrollment is open to students who will be on campus and students who will be studying remotely up to the enrollment limit. Class meets for 50 minutes 4 days per week during the assigned block.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 20b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

Students in HISP 32 will bring their proficiency up to an intermediate level. All skills will be practiced with a focus on developing oral communication. Themes will include familiar topics in the context of the Spanish-speaking world.

(1) M,T,W,Th 10:00 AM–11:30 AM, Mederos

Instruction for this course will be offered remotely. Meeting times for this course are listed in the schedule of classes (in EST). Class meets for 50 minutes 4 days per week during the assigned block.

(2) M,T,W,Th 12:00 PM–1:30 PM, Mederos

Instruction for this course will be offered remotely. Meeting times for this course are listed in the schedule of classes (in EST). Class meets for 50 minutes 4 days per week during the assigned block.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in HISP 20b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

Students in Hisp34 will bring their proficiency up to an intermediate level. All skills will be practiced with an emphasis on developing intercultural competence. Themes will include familiar topics in the context of the Spanish-speaking world.

*HISP classes listed below (104 and above) are conducted in Spanish, unless otherwise noted.*

Poster for HISP 104b:  Peoples, Ideas, and Language of the Hispanic World, Professor González Ros. Followed by a composite of 5 images. The image at top left is of what seems to be a rally of indigenous peoples. Three stand in front of a banner facing camera. One has loudspeaker and the two beside him are cheering or yelling. The second is the cover for “Bebe diferentemente iguales” a song which salutes the diversity of the “differently equal” people of the 19 countries in Latin America and three in Europe (Spain, Portugal and the Catalan-speaking Andorra) that are member nations of the Ibero-American cooperation organization based in Madrid. The third is a picture of two dancers in vibrant clothing. The woman is wearing a ruffled dress of orange, yellow, green, patterned layers, and a yellow turban style hat. She holds the corners of her skirts as high as her head and smiles broadly. The man stands behind her also grinning and holding his black and white, wide-brimmed, straw hat up high. The forth picture is from the documentary film, La Buena vida, and is of the white-haired grandfather lying in his hammock. His creased, sun-leathered brown skin and chiseled indigenous features give him an air of someone who has witnessed history and knows its lessons. The last image is of a brick wall painted white with three cartoonlike male figures. The first is a young person who turns out his pockets to show they are empty. The second figure is of a man in a suit with a briefcase. The third is a man orboy in yellow shirt and blue pants wearing sandals. The words on the wall read: No es: lo que tienes, Lo que haces sino lo que eres which is crossed out and replaced by sos. A description of course follows: Prerequisite: 30-level Hispanic Studies course or equivalent. Consent code required. Participants will expand their language skills in Spanish while deepening their understanding of Hispanic cultures. Students will explore how their identity and those of others is expressed through language, images, and cultural practices.(1) M,W 10:00 AM–11:30 AM, González Ros

Instruction for this course will be offered remotely. Meeting times for this course are listed in the schedule of classes (in EST).

(2) M,W 12:00 PM–1:30 PM, González Ros

Instruction for this course will be offered remotely. Meeting times for this course are listed in the schedule of classes (in EST).

Prerequisite: HISP 32 or 34. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

Participants will expand their language skills in Spanish while deepening their understanding of Hispanic cultures. Students will explore how their identity and those of others is expressed through language, images, and cultural practices.

Poster for HISP 105A: Oral Communication through Cultural Topics, Professor Andrew Sewick. This title is followed by a dramatic horizontal photo of a blank wall of a building corner which is plastered with a several-stories-high black and white, billboard-like photo of a boy who appears to be Latinx in tee shirt and plaid pants pulling himself up to look over the wall. Parts of the photo are torn from the wall. Below the image is the caption: Photo by elCarito, man stabbing his head by himself graffiti, Barrio chino, La Habana, Cuba. A further description of the class follows: Prerequisite: HISP 104b or the equivalent. Consent code required. Students will continue to improve their oral proficiency in Spanish and work towards improved fluency and communication. They will use Spanish in a variety of real-world speaking tasks that prepare them to communicate in personal, professional, and academic settings. An exploration of historical and present-day Latin America, Spain, and the Caribbean will contextualize language learning and invite students to make connections to their own lives: How does society shape the decisions that people make? How does historical context help us better understand the lives of marginalized peoples? How can we empathetically defend the decisions that other people make?poster for HISP 111 with exactly the same text as in adjacent description on website(2) T,Th 6:00 PM–7:30 PM, Sewick

Instruction for this course will be offered remotely. Meeting times for this course are listed in the schedule of classes (in EST).

(3) T,Th 4:00 PM–5:30 PM, Sewick

Instruction for this course will be offered remotely. Meeting times for this course are listed in the schedule of classes (in EST).

Prerequisite: HISP 104b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above).

Students will continue to improve their oral proficiency in Spanish and work towards improved fluency and communication. They will use Spanish in a variety of real-world speaking tasks that prepare them to communicate in personal, professional, and academic settings. An exploration of historical and present-day Latin America, Spain, and the Caribbean will contextualize language learning and invite students to make connections to their own lives: How does society shape the decisions that people make? How does historical context help us better understand the lives of marginalized peoples? How can we empathetically defend the decisions that other people make?

(1) M,W 2:00 PM–3:30 PM, Ospina León

Instruction for this course will be offered remotely. Meeting times for this course are listed in the schedule of classes (in EST).

(2) M,W 4:00 PM–5:30 PM, Reyes de Deu

Instruction for this course will be offered in a hybrid combination of in person and remote sessions, which may vary by course and over the duration of the semester. Enrollment is open to students who will be on campus and students who will be studying remotely up to the enrollment limit.

Prerequisite: HISP 105a or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions above). [WI]

Students will develop their writing skills in order to communicate effectively in a variety of contexts and for different audiences. Examples may include creative, professional, and academic texts.

 

Upper-Level Courses (above HISP 108)

Poster for HISP 111: Introducción a la literatura Latino américana, Lucía Reyes de Deu. América del Sur is outlined in black and has south at the top of image rather than the usual way it is portrayed. The lettering is still right side up. The image caption follows: Inverted map of America (1936) by Uruguayan painter, Joaquin Torres Garcia. Prerequisite: HISP 106b, or HISP 108a, or permission of instructor. [DJW, NW, Cross-listed with: COML Lit Course in a Language Other than English; IGS Elective in Media, Culture, and The Arts; Elective Course in Latin American and Latino St; Cross-Listed in Music/Cultural Studies Track.] Examines key Latin American texts of different genres (poems, short stories and excerpts from novels, chronicles, comics, screenplays, cyberfiction) and from different time periods from the conquest to modernity. This class places emphasis on problems of cultural definition and identity construction as they are elaborated in literary discourse. Identifying major themes (coloniality and emancipation, modernismo and modernity, indigenismo, hybridity and mestizaje, nationalisms, Pan-Americanism, etc.) we will trace continuities and ruptures throughout Latin American intellectual history.(1) M,W 2:00 PM–3:30 PM, Reyes de Deu

Instruction for this course will be offered in a hybrid combination of in person and remote sessions, which may vary by course and over the duration of the semester. Enrollment is open to students who will be on campus and students who will be studying remotely up to the enrollment limit.

Prerequisite: HISP 106b, or HISP 108a, or permission of instructor. [DJW; NW; Cross-listed with COML, IGS, LALS, and MUS]

Taught in Spanish.

Examines key Latin American texts of different genres (poems, short stories and excerpts from novels, chronicles, comics, screenplays, cyberfiction) and from different time periods from the conquest to modernity. This class places emphasis on problems of cultural definition and identity construction as they are elaborated in literary discourse. Identifying major themes (coloniality and emancipation, modernismo and modernity, indigenismo, hybridity and mestizaje, nationalisms, Pan-Americanism, etc.) we will trace continuities and ruptures throughout Latin American intellectual history.

Poster for HISP 158a: A painting by Firelei Báez, "Vessel of Genealogies" is at the top of this poster with the course’s title, “HISP 158a Latina Feminisms” kitty corner across the image of a woman’s head and upper torso. Her huge head of red and dark brown hair is spread across a turquoise background her face, body and arms are covered and hidden by white lace. Her arms are raised and caress hair. The lace on her face is especially thick and seems like gauze, giving the impression of a mummy’s wrapped face. The image Below the image is the picture credit already cited followed by description of class which  is also on website next to image:  Professor María Durán. Taught in English. [DEIS-US, DJW, cross-listed with ENG, LALS, & WGS] This course explores the theoretical frameworks and literary productions of feminisms developed by Latina/xs. It introduces students to a diversity of backgrounds and experiences (Chicana, Dominican American, Cuban American, Salvadoran American, and Puerto Rican authors) as well as a variety of genres (i.e. fiction, poetry, short stories, drama). Using intersectionality as a theoretical tool for analyzing oppressions, students will explore the complex politics of gender, sexuality, class, ethnicity, and race in the lives of Latina/xs. They will also explore Latina/x feminists’ theoretical and/or practical attempts to transcend socially-constructed categories of identity, while acknowledging existing material inequalities.(1) T,Th 2:00 PM–3:30 PM, Durán

Instruction for this course will be offered in a hybrid combination of in person and remote sessions, which may vary by course and over the duration of the semester. Enrollment is open to students who will be on campus and students who will be studying remotely up to the enrollment limit.

Taught in English.

[DEIS-US, DJW, cross-listed with ENG, LALS, & WGS]

This course explores the theoretical frameworks and literary productions of feminisms developed by Latina/xs. It introduces students to a diversity of backgrounds and experiences (Chicana, Dominican American, Cuban American, Salvadoran American, and Puerto Rican authors) as well as a variety of genres (i.e. fiction, poetry, short stories, drama). Using intersectionality as a theoretical tool for analyzing oppressions, students will explore the complex politics of gender, sexuality, class, ethnicity, and race in the lives of Latina/xs. They will also explore Latina/x feminists’ theoretical and/or practical attempts to transcend socially-constructed categories of identity, while acknowledging existing material inequalities.

Race, Class, and Gender: Being in Latin America, Professor Ospina León. This is followed by a painting placed on a black rectangle within the poster for the class. The image on the poster is a black map of South America against a blue sky with clouds above a green sea. Outlines of struggling faces are superimposed on the work. at the top is a horizontal narrow row of repeated USA maps. Below that a narrow stripe of heads, similar to the outlines, but this time filled-in. Its caption reads: Elda Cerrato, La Hora de los Pueblos, 1975, acrylic on linen, 150 × 95 cm. Courtesy: the artist and Henrique Faria Fine Art, New York and Buenos Aires. HISP 164b: Studies in Latin American Literature Prerequisite: HISP 109, HISP 111, or permission of instructor. Taught in Spanish. This course introduces students to debates on race, class, and gender and how these relate to Latin American identity. We will look at literary texts, some artworks and film, in order to explore identitary issues across the region. We will consider historical, cultural, and social factors shaping the texts under study. Through textual analysis, we will hone our reading and interpretative skills, as well as our skills in oral and written communication. Authors include: Juan Francisco Manzano, José Martí, Isabel Allende, Sergio Vodanovic, Judith Ortiz Cofer, and Manuel Puig, among others. Cross-listed with COML and LALS.Topic for Fall 2020: Race, Class, and Gender: Being in Latin America

(1) M,W 4:00 PM–5:30 PM, Ospina León

Instruction for this course will be offered in a hybrid combination of in person and remote sessions, which may vary by course and over the duration of the semester. Enrollment is open to students who will be on campus and students who will be studying remotely up to the enrollment limit.

Prerequisite: HISP 109, HISP 111, or permission of instructor. [Cross-listed with COML and LALS]

Taught in Spanish.

This course introduces students to debates on race, class, and gender and how these relate to Latin American identity. We will look at literary texts, some artworks and film, in order to explore identitary issues across the region. We will consider historical, cultural, and social factors shaping the texts under study. Through textual analysis, we will hone our reading and interpretative skills, as well as our skills in oral and written communication. Authors include: Juan Francisco Manzano, José Martí, Isabel Allende, Sergio Vodanovic, Judith Ortiz Cofer, and Manuel Puig, among others.

Film posters of the 6 films that will be examined during this class are arranged on a black brushstroke sweeping across the horizontal page. The films are "La teta asustada",  "El secreto de sus ojos", "Maria Candelaria",  "Limite", "La sirga", and "Memorias del subdesarrollo". HISP 193b Topics in Cinema REPRESENTATION AND FILM-STYLE: LATIN AMERICAN CINEMA Professor Ospina León The text in the poster reads: Prerequisite: HISP 109, HISP 111, or permission of instructor. Taught in Spanish. [Cross-listed with FTIM and LALS] This course offers an advanced introduction to the history of Latin American cinema and film culture. With a comparative approach, we will study cinema’s capacity to motivate political reflection, build modern identities, and shape public discourse in a region rife with social inequality. Travelling across regions and époques, we will cover six cinematic periods: Contemporary Cinema, New Latin American Cinema, Art Cinema, Neorealism, Studio Cinema, and Silent Cinema. We will pay attention to the historical and sociopolitical contexts films spring from and reflect upon. We will also develop the critical tools and learn basic theoretical tenets for the study of moving images. Therefore, we will pay attention to film-style (camera movement, mise-en-scène, lighting, editing, sound, genre) and consider the film culture surrounding specific films.Topic for Fall 2020: Representation and Film-Style: Latin American Cinema

(1) M,W 8:00 PM–9:30 PM, Ospina León

Instruction for this course will be offered in a hybrid combination of in person and remote sessions, which may vary by course and over the duration of the semester. Enrollment is open to students who will be on campus and students who will be studying remotely up to the enrollment limit.

Prerequisite: HISP 109, HISP 111, or permission of instructor. [Cross-listed with FTIM and LALS]

Taught in Spanish.

This course offers an advanced introduction to the history of Latin American cinema and film culture. With a comparative approach, we will study cinema’s capacity to motivate political reflection, build modern identities, and shape public discourse in a region rife with social inequality. Travelling across regions and époques, we will cover six cinematic periods: Contemporary Cinema, New Latin American Cinema, Art Cinema, Neorealism, Studio Cinema, and Silent Cinema. We will pay attention to the historical and sociopolitical contexts films spring from and reflect upon. We will also develop the critical tools and learn basic theoretical tenets for the study of moving images. Therefore, we will pay attention to film-style (camera movement, mise-en-scène, lighting, editing, sound, genre) and consider the film culture surrounding specific films.

This is a poster for HISP 198A: Experiential Research Seminar in Literary and Cultural Studies, James Mandrell. The background is bright red and the letters are white.  Below the title of course and instructor is a photo of a family. The mustachioed father is in tee-shirt and short bathrobe looking somewhat disheveled and stands on a large white tarp with grommets which goes up behind the family to the top of photo making a white backdrop for group. To his right is a young girl with dark, long hair of perhaps 14 years of age. In front of her are two younger boys, perhaps 4 and 8 standing very tall. The older boy standing to right of the other is in a military stance. Behind him stands a woman who is probably his mother who is wearing a blue bathrobe and sandals with arms crossed. The group looks out at us with challenging facial expressions and body language. Below the photo is the credit: Karina Gidi, José María Yazpik, Geraldine Galván, Christopher Ruíz-Esparza, and Gerardo Ruíz-Esparza in Abel (2010) dirección:  Diego Luna, copyright © 2010 Canana. Next is the description of the course. Prerequisite: HISP 109b or HISP 110a or HISP 111b, or permission of the instructor. Required for Hispanic Studies majors, but open to minors and other programs. This seminar and writing workshop will accompany the student in choosing the topic for and developing, researching, and writing an original capstone project. We will use a mix of practical and conceptual tools to facilitate this path. We will also study and discuss cultural material (such as short texts, films, etc.) in order to revisit a number of topics and problems central to Hispanic Studies, particularly when it pertains to the students' paper topics. The class will be strongly shaped by students' own previous and developing interests. Taught in both English and Spanish.(1) F 10:00 AM–1:00 PM, Mandrell

Instruction for this course will be offered in a hybrid combination of in person and remote sessions, which may vary by course and over the duration of the semester. Enrollment is open to students who will be on campus and students who will be studying remotely up to the enrollment limit.

Prerequisite: HISP 109b or HISP 111b, or permission of the instructor.
Taught in both English and Spanish.

Required for Hispanic Studies majors, but open to minors and other programs. This seminar and writing workshop will accompany the student in choosing the topic for and developing, researching, and writing an original capstone project. We will use a mix of practical and conceptual tools to facilitate this path. We will also study and discuss cultural material (such as short texts, films, etc.) in order to revisit a number of topics and problems central to Hispanic Studies, particularly when it pertains to the students' paper topics. The class will be strongly shaped by students' own previous and developing interests.

 

Cross-Listed in Hispanic Studies

HUM/UWS 1A Tragedy: Love & Death in the Creative Imagination

(1) M,W 8:00 AM–9:30 AM, Burt

Instruction for this course will be offered in-person. Meeting times for this course are listed in the schedule of classes (in EST).

Enrollment limited to Humanities Fellows.

How do you turn catastrophe into art - and why? This first-year seminar in the humanities addresses such elemental questions, especially those centering on love and death. How does literature catch hold of catastrophic experiences and make them intelligible or even beautiful? Should misery even be beautiful? By exploring the tragic tradition in literature across many eras, cultures, genres, and languages, this course looks for basic patterns.