Your major is just the beginning...

Your major helps you develop knowledge, skills and abilities that employers seek.

To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through your coursework, activities and work, consider using the reflection worksheets (accessible via B.hired > Resources) and/or Type Focus (accessible via B.hired > Resources).

To build your resume, please review Hiatt's sample resumes.

Internships

bix

The Brandeis Internship Exchange is a convenient online tool to find and share internship opportunities.

Just log on with your UNET ID and use the advanced search to search internships by major.

Comparative Literature

Overview
First Destination Data
Alumni Career Paths
What to do with a degree in Comparative Literature
Comparative Literature Web Sites
Graduate School Information

Overview 

The interdisciplinary Comparative Literature Program engages the study of literatures and cultures within and across national boundaries. It also comprises comparative analysis of literary texts and genres with visual art forms, social discourse and practices, as well as other expressions of cultural innovation.
 
Comparative Literature is one of the most multicultural programs on campus. Students find that their background in Comparative Literature serves them well in preparation for a great variety of graduate and professional careers. 

First Destination Data

The Hiatt Center is pleased to provide a list of organizations, titles and fields of alumni who majored in your discipline. Click here to download a sortable excel spreadsheet listing the first destination graduate programs and employment opportunities that Comparative Literature alumni from the classes of 2008-2012 secured within six months of graduation.

The diverse list is indicative of the wealth of transferable skills students cultivate as a Comparative Literature major at Brandeis.

Comparative Literature Alumni

The Hiatt Center is pleased to provide a list of organizations, titles and fields of alumni who majored in your discipline. The list represents a wide array of professions, which is indicative of the wealth of transferable students cultivate as a Comparative Literature major at Brandeis.

Year
Company
Title
Industry
2011 Employment Justice Center Advocacy Associate Legal Services
2010 Temkin Group User Experience Researcher Management Consulting
2008 Bet Tzedek Legal Services Employments Rights Project Fellow Law
2006 InfoMedics Customer Support Representative Consumer Services
2006 Greater Boston Legal Services Equal Justice Works Fellow Law
2006 Mary Ryan Gallery Gallery Associate Arts
1971 U.S. Department of State Deputy Director for Pakistan/Bangladesh Government
1975 Brigham and Women’s Hospital Director of Cardiovascular Medicine  Health

What to Do with a Degree in Comparative Literature 

This degree’s interdisciplinary character helps students develop a range of skills that touch on the exploration of both literature (for example, English) and international studies. For a view of potential career options see:


Comparative Literature Web Sites

Graduate School Information and Resources


Expand All / Collapse All


Skills, Abilities & Knowledge

Click Here to Expand Section

Skills, Abilities & Knowledge  

Your program of study at Brandeis University provides both field-specific knowledge and a broad range of transferable skills, abilities and knowledge that are sought after by all employers in all fields and enhance your experience and success in the world of work. To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through coursework, activities and work, take TypeFocus.

Skills1

  • Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs.
  • Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate.
  • Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Learning Strategies — Selecting and using training/instructional methods and procedures appropriate for the situation when learning or teaching new things.
  • Writing — Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Social Perceptiveness — Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Monitoring — Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

Abilities

  • Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Speech Clarity — The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
  • Written Comprehension — The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Written Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • Speech Recognition — The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.
  • Inductive Reasoning — The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
  • Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.

Knowledge

  • Group behavior and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins.
  • Theories and principals about different philosophical systems and religions, including their basic principles, values, ethics, ways of thinking, customs, practices, and their impact on human culture.
  • Historical events and their causes, indicators, and effects on civilizations and cultures.
  • Communication and information dissemination techniques and methods
  • Leadership and coordination of people and resources
  • Esthetics, cultural trends and history of ideas
  • Multiple languages

1 Excerpted from O*Net OnLine, US Department of Labor by the National Center for O*Net Development


Sample of Possible Occupations

Click Here to Expand Section

Attorney
Book Editor
Book Store Manager
College Professor
Columnist
Communications Manager
Copywriter
Creative Writer
Critic
Director
Editor
Editorial Assistant
Educational Program Specialist
ESL Teacher
Freelance Writer
Fundraiser
Human Resource Specialist
Interpreter/Translator
Investment Counselor/Manager
Journalist
Labor Relations Specialist
Lawyer
Librarian
Linguist
Literary Agent
Lobbyist
Magazine Writer
Manuscript Reader
Media Planner
Narrator
Newspaper Editor
Novelist
Paralegal
Playwright
Proofreader
Prose Writer
Public Relations Specialist
Public Speaker
Publisher
Reporter
Speech Writer
Story Editor
Teacher
Writer

1 Excerpted from O*Net OnLine, US Department of Labor by the National Center for O*Net Development