Your major is just the beginning...

Your major helps you develop knowledge, skills and abilities that employers seek.

To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through your coursework, activities and work, consider using the reflection worksheets (accessible via B.hired > Resources) and/or Type Focus (accessible via B.hired > Resources).

To build your resume, please review Hiatt's sample resumes.

Internships

bix

The Brandeis Internship Exchange is a convenient online tool to find and share internship opportunities.

Just log on with your UNET ID and use the advanced search to search internships by major.

Creative Writing

Overview
First Destination Data
Alumni Career Path
What to do with a degree in Creative Writing
Graduate School Information

Overview 

The Creative Writing Program is structured to allow flexible participation in its activities by a diverse body of students whose interest or commitment may vary in nature or over time.

Recent majors have received fellowships at Cornell University, Syracuse University, and the University of Michigan, among others. Many graduates have been published across many fields. Several more are teaching creative writing at schools such as Tufts University, Rhode Island School of Design, The New School, and Bentley College.

First Destination Data

The Hiatt Center is pleased to provide a list of organizations, titles and fields of alumni who majored in your discipline. Click here to download a sortable excel spreadsheet listing the first destination graduate programs and employment opportunities that Creative Writing alumni from the classes of 2008-2012 secured within six months of graduation.

The diverse list is indicative of the wealth of transferable skills students cultivate as a Creative Writing major at Brandeis.

Creative Writing Alumni

The Hiatt Center is pleased to provide a list of organizations, titles and fields of alumni who majored in your discipline. The list represents a wide array of professions, which is indicative of the wealth of transferable skills students cultivate as a Creative Writing major at Brandeis.

Year
Company
Title
Industry
1998 New England Journal of Medicine Editorial Assistant Publishing and Journalism
1998 Coincidence Productions  Screenwriter & Producer Media and Entertainment
1998 Amnesty International  Director Non-Profit
2005 New York City Board of Education Teacher Education, PreK-12
2005 Dorchester Publishing Co., Inc.  Production Assistant Publishing and Journalism
2005 Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer Non-Profit
2006 Miles and Generalist Office Assistant Real Estate
2006 Oxford University Press Publicity Assistant Publishing and Journalism
2007 Innovative Artists Literary Agent Assistant Media and Entertainment

What to Do with a Degree in Creative Writing (.pdf)

 

Graduate School Information and Resources

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Skills, Abilities & Knowledge

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Skills, Abilities & Knowledge  

Your program of study at Brandeis University provides both field-specific knowledge and a broad range of transferable skills, abilities and knowledge that are sought after by all employers in all fields and enhance your experience and success and the world of work. To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through coursework, activities and work, take TypeFocus.

Skills1

  • Writing — Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Social Perceptiveness — Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Time Management — Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Monitoring — Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Judgment and Decision Making — Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Abilities

  • Written Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • Originality — The ability to come up with unusual or clever ideas about a given topic or situation, or to develop creative ways to solve a problem.
  • Fluency of Ideas — The ability to come up with a number of ideas about a topic (the number of ideas is important, not their quality, correctness, or creativity).
  • Written Comprehension — The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • Inductive Reasoning — The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
  • Information Ordering — The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).

Knowledge

  • English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Communications and Media — Knowledge of media production, communication, and dissemination techniques and methods. This includes alternative ways to inform and entertain via written, oral, and visual media.
  • Sales and Marketing — Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

1 Excerpted from O*Net OnLine, US Department of Labor by the National Center for O*Net Development


Sample of Possible Occupations

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Arranger
Creative Director     
Orchestrator
Associate Media Director     
Critic     
Patient Relations Specialist
Author     
Crossword Puzzle Maker     
Playwright
Biographer     
Editor     
Poet
Book Reviewer
Editorial Writer     
Program Proposals Coordinator
Broadcast Supervisor     
Electronic Publishing     
Project Supervisor    
Spokesperson     
Teacher

Columnist     
Fact Checker     
Proofreader
Commentator        
Public Relations
Composer      
Publications Specialist
Continuity Writer     
Librettist     
Publicity Assistant
Copy Editor     
Lobbyist     
Publicity Director
Copywriter     
Lyricist
Reporter
Sales Service
Promoter     
Medical Writer     
Researcher


1 Excerpted from O*Net OnLine, US Department of Labor by the National Center for O*Net Development