Your major is just the beginning...

Your major helps you develop knowledge, skills and abilities that employers seek.

To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through your coursework, activities and work, consider using the reflection worksheets (accessible via B.hired > Resources) and/or Type Focus (accessible via B.hired > Resources).

To build your resume, please review Hiatt's sample resumes.

Internships

bix

The Brandeis Internship Exchange is a convenient online tool to find and share internship opportunities.

Just log on with your UNET ID and use the advanced search to search internships by major.

English

Overview
First Destination Data
Alumni Career Paths
Internships
What to do with a degree in English
English Web Sites
Graduate School Information

Overview 

In addition to being inherently pleasurable and intellectually exciting, a major or minor in English will help you develop important skills. English students learn how to read carefully and closely, write skillfully and stylishly, and argue analytically and critically. These communication skills are in high demand.

Students who major in English are prepared for careers in teaching, law, business, publishing, writing, and administration. Among our graduates are scientists, businessmen and women, professors, lawyers, filmmakers, television producers, psychologists, fiction writers and poets, literary agents, and social activists.

First Destination Data

The Hiatt Center is pleased to provide a list of organizations, titles and fields of alumni who majored in your discipline. Click here to download a sortable excel spreadsheet listing the first destination graduate programs and employment opportunities that English alumni from the classes of 2008-2012 secured within six months of graduation.

The diverse list is indicative of the wealth of transferable skills students cultivate as an English major at Brandeis.

English Alumni

The Hiatt Center is pleased to provide a list of organizations, titles and fields of alumni who majored in your discipline. The list represents a wide array of professions, which is indicative of the wealth of transferable skills students cultivate as an English major at Brandeis.

Year
Company   Title Industry 
 1998  

UGO Networks Inc.

Web Editor Media and Entertainment
 2000 NRI Community Services Outpatient Clinician Counseling and Social Services
 2002 Weber Shandwick Worldwide Print and Online Project Manager Non-Profit
 2003 City of New York / Parks & Recreation Deputy Chief of Staff Government
 2003 MATCH Charter Public High School Special Education Teacher Education- PreKto12
 2003 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Editorial Assistant Publishing and Journalism
 2004 Areotek Technical Recruiter Sales
 2006 Verson Nautical Corporation Systmes Instructor Information Technology
 2007 auctionPAL., Inc Auction Expert Publishing and Journalism

 Internships 

In addition to you coursework, internships can be extremely beneficial as you develop academic and professional skills.  The Brandeis Internship Exchange is an easy and convenient online tool for you to find and share real internship opportunities.  Just log on with your UNET ID and use the advanced search to identify majors' internships.

What to Do with a Degree in English  (.pdf)


  English Web Sites

 

Graduate School Information and Resources

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Skills, Abilities & Knowledge

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Skills, Abilities & Knowledge  

Your program of study at Brandeis University provides both field-specific knowledge and a broad range of transferable skills, abilities and knowledge that are sought after by all employers in all fields and enhance your experience and success in the world of work. To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through coursework, activities and work, take TypeFocus.

Skills1

  • Reading Comprehension— Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Writing— Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Critical Thinking— Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Learning Strategies — Selecting and using training/instructional methods and procedures appropriate for the situation when learning or teaching new things.
  • Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Social Perceptiveness — Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.

Abilities

  • Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Written Comprehension— The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.>
  • Written Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Speech Clarity — The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
  • Inductive Reasoning — The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
  • Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • Speech Recognition — The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.

Knowledge

  • English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Education and Training — Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Communications and Media — Knowledge of media production, communication, and dissemination techniques and methods. This includes alternative ways to inform and entertain via written, oral, and visual media.
  • Philosophy and Theology — Knowledge of different philosophical systems and religions. This includes their basic principles, values, ethics, ways of thinking, customs, practices, and their impact on human culture.
  • Psychology — Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders.
  • History and Archeology — Knowledge of historical events and their causes, indicators, and effects on civilizations and cultures.
  • Sociology and Anthropology — Knowledge of group behavior and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins.

1Excerpted from O*Net OnLine, US Department of Labor by the National Center for O*Net Development


Sample of Possible Occupations

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Account Executive
Editor, Film/Video or Literary/Magazine
Loan Officer
Magazine Writer
Advertising Copywriter/Editor
Manuscript Reader
Artist
Editor
Market Research Analyst
Marketing Specialist
Attorney
Education and Training
Marketing
Educational Program Specialist
Mass Media Assistant
Scientific Writer
Entertainment Agent
Media Planner
Medical Records Biographer
Foreign Correspondent
Narrator Book Critic
Freelance Writer/Consultant
Novelist
Business Manager
Fundraiser
Greeting Card Writer
College Professor
Hotel and Motel Manager
Playwright
Congressional Aide
Public Administrator
Crossword Puzzle Maker
Journalist
Public Relations Specialist
Curator
Radio/TV Newscaster
Speech Writer
Sports Writer
Social Welfare Examiner
Teacher
Social Worker
ESL Teacher
Technical Writer
Scriptwriter/Producer


1 Excerpted from O*Net OnLine, US Department of Labor by the National Center for O*Net Development