Your major is just the beginning...

Your major helps you develop knowledge, skills and abilities that employers seek.

To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through your coursework, activities and work, consider using the reflection worksheets (accessible via B.hired > Resources) and/or Type Focus (accessible via B.hired > Resources).

To build your resume, please review Hiatt's sample resumes.

Internships

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The Brandeis Internship Exchange is a convenient online tool to find and share internship opportunities.

Just log on with your UNET ID and use the advanced search to search internships by major.

Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies

Overview
First Destination Data
Alumni Career Paths
Internships
What to do with a degree in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies
Graduate School Information

Overview 

The Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies (IMES) Program is an interdisciplinary curriculum sponsored by the Department of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies in conjunction with the faculty from several other departments. It is designed to provide a strong foundation in Middle Eastern studies with a specialized knowledge of Islam.

With a solid training in language, political theory and praxis, history, economics, sociology, and anthropology, the major is especially appropriate for students wishing to pursue graduate work, particularly in the field of Middle Eastern studies, or for those who wish to pursue careers dealing directly or indirectly with the Middle East.

First Destination Data

The Hiatt Center is pleased to provide a list of organizations, titles and fields of alumni who majored in your discipline. Click here to download a sortable spreadsheet listing the first destination graduate programs and employment opportunities that Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies alumni from the classes of 2008-2012 secured within six months of graduation.

The diverse list is indicative of the wealth of transferable skills students cultivate as an Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies major at Brandeis.

Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies Alumni

The Hiatt Center is pleased to provide a list of organizations, titles and fields of alumni who majored in your discipline. The list represents a wide array of professions, which is indicative of the wealth of transferable skills students cultivate as an Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies major at Brandeis.

Year
Company
Title
Industry
2013 IRD

Coordination Assistant

Nonprofit
2013

The Crown Center for Middle East Studies

Program Coordinator

International Relations
2012

Middle East Institute

Research Assistant

Research
2010 Friends of the Earth - Middle East NIF/Shatil Fellow Enviornmental Conservation
2010 Project Interchange American - Jewish Committee  Assistant Director NPO
2010 CMI International Group, LLC Associate - Conflict Resolution Management Consulting
2010 NewsWorks.org Reporter Newspaper
2010 Tel Aviv University Grant Writer NPO Management
2009 International Institute of Connecticut Matching Grant Coordinator International Affairs
2009 Sherpa Analytics Manager of Information Sciences PR & Communication
2008 International Institute of Strategic Studies Program Officer & Research Analyst Think Tank

 

Internships 

In addition to you coursework, internships can be extremely beneficial as you develop academic and professional skills.  The Brandeis Internship Exchange is an easy and convenient online tool for you to find and share real internship opportunities.  Just log on with your UNET ID and use the advanced search to identify majors' internships.

What to Do with a Degree in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies (.pdf)



Graduate School Information and Resources


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Skills, Abilities & Knowledge

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Your program of study at Brandeis University provides both field-specific knowledge and a broad range of transferable skills, abilities and knowledge that are sought after by all employers in all fields and enhance your experience and success and the world of work. To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through coursework, activities and work, take TypeFocus.

Skills1

  • Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Writing — Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Social Perceptiveness — Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Learning Strategies — Selecting and using training/instructional methods and procedures appropriate for the situation when learning or teaching new things.
  • Persuasion — Persuading others to change their minds or behavior.

Abilities

  • Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Written Comprehension — The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • Inductive Reasoning — The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
  • Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Speech Clarity — The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
  • Written Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).

Knowledge

  • English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • History and Archeology — Knowledge of historical events and their causes, indicators, and effects on civilizations and cultures.
  • Foreign Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of a foreign (non-English) language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition and grammar, and pronunciation.
  • Sociology and Anthropology — Knowledge of group behavior and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins.
  • Philosophy and Theology — Knowledge of different philosophical systems and religions. This includes their basic principles, values, ethics, ways of thinking, customs, practices, and their impact on human culture.
  • Geography — Knowledge of principles and methods for describing the features of land, sea, and air masses, including their physical characteristics, locations, interrelationships, and distribution of plant, animal, and human life.
  • Communications and Media — Knowledge of media production, communication, and dissemination techniques and methods. This includes alternative ways to inform and entertain via written, oral, and visual media.

1 Excerpted from O*Net OnLine, US Department of Labor by the National Center for O*Net Development


Sample of Possible Occupations

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Anthropologist
FBI/CIA Agent
Journalist
Archeologist
Foreign News Correspondent
Lawyer
Archivist Foreign
Service Officer
Lecturer
Biographer
Genealogist
Legal Assistant/Paralegal
Government Official
Librarian
Community Relations Director
Historian
Lobbyist
Congressional Aide
Historic Preservationist
Market Research Analyst
Historic Site Tour Guide
Media Consultant
Criminologist
Indicter
Editor
International Relations
Political Scientist
Teacher
Urban Administrator
Public Relations Specialist
Technical Writer
Urban Planner
Research Assistant
Travel Agent Writer/Author
Sociologist
Economist

1 Excerpted from O*Net OnLine, US Department of Labor by the National Center for O*Net Development