Your major is just the beginning...

Your major helps you develop knowledge, skills and abilities that employers seek.

To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through your coursework, activities and work, consider using the reflection worksheets (accessible via B.hired > Resources) and/or Type Focus (accessible via B.hired > Resources).

To build your resume, please review Hiatt's sample resumes.

Internships

bix

The Brandeis Internship Exchange is a convenient online tool to find and share internship opportunities.

Just log on with your UNET ID and use the advanced search to search internships by major.

Language and Linguistics

Overview
First Destination Data
Alumni Career Paths
Internships
Language and Linguistics Web Sites
Graduate School Information

Overview 

The Language and Linguistics Program focuses on theoretical generative linguistics. In addition to core courses on phonological theory, syntactic theory, formal semantics, and formal pragmatics, we offer electives on morphology, linguistic typology, language acquisition and development, the mathematical foundations of linguistics, historical linguistics, and computational linguistics.

Majors find that their Language and Linguistics background serves them well in preparation for a diverse variety of graduate and professional careers. Previous majors have had profound influence on fields as diverse as philosophy, psychology, anthropology, computer science, and linguistics.

First Destination Data

The Hiatt Center is pleased to provide a list of organizations, titles and fields of alumni who majored in your discipline. Click here to download a sortable spreadsheet listing the first destination graduate programs and employment opportunities that Language and Linguistics alumni from the classes of 2008-2012 secured within six months of graduation.

The diverse list is indicative of the wealth of transferable skills students cultivate as a Language and Linguistics major at Brandeis.

Language and Linguistics Alumni

The Hiatt Center is pleased to provide a list of organizations, titles and fields of alumni who majored in your discipline. The list represents a wide array of professions, which is indicative of the wealth of transferable skills students cultivate as a Language and Linguistics major at Brandeis.

Year
Company
Title
Industry
2014 Student Language Exchange Campus Director Education
2013 Jewish Alliance of Greater Rhode Island

Development Associate

Nonprofit
2012 Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (Dyspnea Lab) Clinical Research Assitant I Research
2011 Epic Technical Services Healthcare/ Computer Software
2011 Pivotal Labs Software Engineer Computer Software
2009 Somerville Public Schools Speech-Language Pathologis Education
2009 Books Realty, LLC Vice President of Finance Finance
2007 Rosie’s Place Public Policy Coordinator  Social Services

Internships

In addition to you coursework, internships can be extremely beneficial as you develop academic and professional skills.  The Brandeis Internship Exchange is an easy and convenient online tool for you to find and share real internship opportunities.  Just log on with your UNET ID and use the advanced search to identify majors' internships.

Language and Linguistics Web Sites

Graduate School Information and Resources

Graduate study

Graduates of the language and linguistics undergraduate program have a strong, long-standing record of continuing on to Ph.D. work in the top graduate programs in linguistics. Recent graduates are Ph.D. students at the following universities:

  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • The University of Maryland
  • The University of Michigan
  • New York University
  • Ohio State University
  • Rutgers University

In addition, prominent linguists with Brandeis bachelor’s degrees in linguistics are members of the faculty at the following:

  • University of California at Santa Cruz
  • University of Southern California
  • Hebrew University
  • Cornell University
  • Carleton University, Canada
  • Utrecht University, The Netherlands

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Skills, Abilities & Knowledge

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Your program of study at Brandeis University provides both field-specific knowledge and a broad range of transferable skills, abilities and knowledge that are sought after by all employers in all fields and enhance your experience and success in the world of work. To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through coursework, activities and work, take TypeFocus. Skills1
  • Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Social Perceptiveness — Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Time Management — Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Monitoring — Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Writing — Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
Abilities
  • Speech Recognition — The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.
  • Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Written Comprehension — The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • Speech Clarity — The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
  • Information Ordering — The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
  • Written Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • Auditory Attention — The ability to focus on a single source of sound in the presence of other distracting sounds.
  • Hearing Sensitivity — The ability to detect or tell the differences between sounds that vary in pitch and loudness.
  • Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
Knowledge
  • English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Foreign Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of a foreign (non-English) language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition and grammar, and pronunciation.
  • Philosophy and Theology — Knowledge of different philosophical systems and religions. This includes their basic principles, values, ethics, ways of thinking, customs, practices, and their impact on human culture. Psychology — Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders.
  • History and Archeology — Knowledge of historical events and their causes, indicators, and effects on civilizations and cultures.
  • Fine Arts — Knowledge of the theory and techniques required to compose, produce, and perform works of music, dance, visual arts, drama, and sculpture.
  • Computers and Electronics — Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Sociology and Anthropology — Knowledge of group behavior and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins.


1 Excerpted from O*Net OnLine, US Department of Labor by the National Center for O*Net Development

Sample of Possible Occupations

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Diverse career fields

Graduates of the program also commonly go on to careers in areas such as speech pathology, computational linguistics and natural language processing, teaching (including TESOL) and law. Speech pathology has been an especially popular choice for our graduates in recent years, with alumni currently enrolled in or having recently graduated from master's degree programs at:

  • Massachusetts General Hospital's Institute of Health Professions

  • Sargent College at Boston University

  • Northeastern University

  • Columbia University

  • New York University

Additional specialities and occupations include:

Archivist

Teacher

Translator

Interpreter

Linguist

Diplomat

Writer/Editor

Producer

Proofreader

Curator

Language Annotator

Language Documentation

Cultural Preservation

Language Specialist

Literary Agent

Story Editor

Speech and Language Pathologist

Lexicographer

Computational Linguist

Linguistic Anthropologist (in non-profit or government)

Foreign Correspondent

Standardized testing development and assessment

Book Critic

Lobbyist

1 Select occupations from O*Net OnLine, US Department of Labor by the National Center for O*Net Development