Your major is just the beginning...

Your major helps you develop knowledge, skills and abilities that employers seek.

To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through your coursework, activities and work, consider using the reflection worksheets (accessible via B.hired > Resources) and/or Type Focus (accessible via B.hired > Resources).

To build your resume, please review Hiatt's sample resumes.

Internships

bix

The Brandeis Internship Exchange is a convenient online tool to find and share internship opportunities.

Just log on with your UNET ID and use the advanced search to search internships by major.

Neuroscience

Overview
First Destination Data
Alumni Career Paths
Skills, Abilities & Knowledge
Internships
Sample of Occupations
Neuroscience Web Sites
Graduate School Information

Overview 

The Neuroscience program is an interdisciplinary program of study of the neural mechanisms involved in the control of human or animal behavior. The major combines a strong foundation in basic science with more specialized courses in biology and psychology. This program is especially appropriate for students wishing to pursue further study in medicine, experimental psychology or neuroscience.

First Destination Data

The Hiatt Center is pleased to provide a list of organizations, titles and fields of alumni who majored in your discipline. Click here to download a sortable spreadsheet listing the first destination graduate programs and employment opportunities that Neuroscience alumni from the classes of 2008-2012 secured within six months of graduation.

The diverse list is indicative of the wealth of transferable skills students cultivate as a Neuroscience major at Brandeis.

Neuroscience Alumni

The Hiatt Center is pleased to provide a list of organizations, titles and fields of alumni who majored in your discipline. The list represents a wide array of professions, which is indicative of the wealth of transferable skills students cultivate as a Neuroscience major at Brandeis.

Year
Company
Title
Industry
1993 Columbia Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine Health Care
2007 Child Health Institute Research Assistant Health Care
1993 Johns Hopkins University Instructor in Oncology Health Care
1991 Litholink Corporation CEO  
1988 Pfizer Director/Team Leader in Planning & Business Development Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical
1997 Self Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeon Health Care
1997 Allegheny General Hospital Hospital Resident Health Care
2000 North Shore Medical Center Resident Physician Health Care
       
2005 Massachusetts General Hospital Research Technician Scientific Research
       
1991 Greenberg Laser Eye Center Physician, Ophthalmologist Health Care
2005 NECBB Accounts Receivable Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical
2003 Yale University Graduate Student Scientific Research
2005 Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law Student Law
2007 Student Student Scientific Research
2000 University of Toronto Resident Health Care
2002 Office Depot Sr. Mgr. Finance Finance and Banking
2008 EquiSearch Services, Inc. Investigative Researcher Finance and Banking
2007 Graybiel Lab Research assistant Scientific Research

Skills, Abilities & Knowledge

Your program of study at Brandeis University provides both field-specific knowledge and a broad range of transferable skills, abilities and knowledge that are sought after by all employers in all fields and enhance your experience and success and the world of work. To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through coursework, activities and work, take TypeFocus.

Internships 

In addition to you coursework, internships can be extremely beneficial as you develop academic and professional skills.  The Brandeis Internship Exchange is an easy and convenient online tool for you to find and share real internship opportunities.  Just log on with your UNET ID and use the advanced search to identify majors' internships.


Sample of Possible Occupations


Neuroscience Web Sites

Graduate School Information and Resources

Expand All / Collapse All


Skills, Abilities & Knowledge

Click Here to Expand Section

Your program of study at Brandeis University provides both field-specific knowledge and a broad range of transferable skills, abilities and knowledge that are sought after by all employers in all fields and enhance your experience and success in the world of work. To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through coursework, activities and work, take TypeFocus.

Skills1

  • Science — Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
  • Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Writing — Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Judgment and Decision Making — Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Complex Problem Solving — Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Analyzing Data or Information — Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.

Abilities

  • Inductive Reasoning — The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
  • Written Comprehension — The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • Written Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • Category Flexibility — The ability to generate or use different sets of rules for combining or grouping things in different ways.
  • Information Ordering — The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
  • Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.

Knowledge

  • Biology — Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
  • Psychology — Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods.
  • Computers and Electronics — Knowledge of computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

1 Excerpted from O*Net OnLine, US Department of Labor by the National Center for O*Net Development