Your major is just the beginning...

Your major helps you develop knowledge, skills and abilities that employers seek.

To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through your coursework, activities and work, consider using the reflection worksheets (accessible via B.hired > Resources) and/or Type Focus (accessible via B.hired > Resources).

To build your resume, please review Hiatt's sample resumes.

Internships

bix

The Brandeis Internship Exchange is a convenient online tool to find and share internship opportunities.

Just log on with your UNET ID and use the advanced search to search internships by major.

Physics

Overview
First Destination Data
Alumni Career Paths
Internships
What to do with a degree in Physics
Physics Web Sites
Graduate School Information

Overview 

Physics is the branch of science concerned with the study of properties and interactions of space, time, matter and energy.

The Department of Physics requires students to attain a firm grasp of the basic principles of classical physics and familiarity with those of quantum physics in order to learn how to decide which principles are relevant to a given situation, to construct the appropriate mathematical model, to develop the mathematical skills necessary to carry out the computations that generate predictions and to strengthen the experimental skills used in exploring new phenomena and in carrying out the verification step of a typical scenario.

Brandeis offers students the unique opportunity to prepare for graduate school or employment in a variety of technical fields. The undergraduate program is strongly based on a first-rate research program by the department’s faculty, which gives students the opportunity to participate in cutting-edge research in areas including astrophysics and cosmology, biological physics, condensed matter physics, high energy particle physics and theoretical physics, as well as topics such as string theory, liquid crystals, DNA, polymers, elementary particles, distant quasars and the early universe.

Most graduates go on to graduate school, while some go into high-tech employment, medical school or other professional studies. Brandeis Physics majors have a record of entering the best graduate programs.

First Destination Data

The Hiatt Center is pleased to provide a list of organizations, titles and fields of alumni who majored in your discipline. Click here to download a sortable spreadsheet listing the first destination graduate programs and employment opportunities that Physics alumni from the classes of 2008-2012 secured within six months of graduation.

The diverse list is indicative of the wealth of transferable skills students cultivate as a Physics major at Brandeis.

Physics Alumni

The Hiatt Center is pleased to provide a list of organizations, titles and fields of alumni who majored in your discipline. The list represents a wide array of professions, which is indicative of the wealth of transferable skills students cultivate as a Physics major at Brandeis.

Year Company Title Industry
2011 Deutsche Bank Analyst Finance
1975 Downtown Physical Therapy Physical Therapist Healthcare
2005 UC Berkley PhD Student Higher Ed
2011 US Air Force Grad Engineering Intern Government
2008 The Munich Eye Columnist Writing and Editing
2006 Wolfe Laboratories Scientist Chemical
2011 Norwood High School Physics Teacher Education
2008 US EPA Moves Intern Personal Democracy Renewables & Environment
2011 Media Business Consultant Consulting
2006 State of MA Legal/Legislative Intern Law
2003 Yale University NERA Economic Systems Programmer Information Technology
2004 Self Employed Yoga Instructor, Entrepreneur Health, Wellness and Fitness
2001 MIT, Lincoln Lab Systems Software Architect Information Technology
2009 Huntington Theatre Company Asst to Artistic Director Performing Arts
2009 QD Vision, Inc BLU Applications Engineer Research

Skills, Abilities & Knowledge

Your program of study at Brandeis University provides both field-specific knowledge and a broad range of transferable skills, abilities and knowledge that are sought after by all employers in all fields and enhance your experience and success in the world of work. To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through coursework, activities and work, take TypeFocus.

Internships 

In addition to you coursework, internships can be extremely beneficial as you develop academic and professional skills.  The Brandeis Internship Exchange is an easy and convenient online tool for you to find and share real internship opportunities.  Just log on with your UNET ID and use the advanced search to identify majors' internships.

What to Do with a Degree in Physics (.pdf)


Physics Web Sites

Graduate School Information and Resources

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Skills, Abilities & Knowledge

Click Here to Expand Section

Your program of study at Brandeis University provides both field-specific knowledge and a broad range of transferable skills, abilities and knowledge that are sought after by all employers in all fields and enhance your experience and success in the world of work. To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through coursework, activities and work, take TypeFocus.

Skills and Abilities1

  • Science — Use scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
  • Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Complex Problem Solving — Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Communication — Develop and write research proposals, review scientific literature, prepare technical reports, talk to others and write to convey information effectively
  • Technical — Design equipment, identify/classify materials, observe data, establish experimental designs, use instruments
  • Programming — Write computer programs for various purposes.
  • Investigative Skills — Define research problems, develop research models, establish hypotheses, gather and analyze data, evaluate ideas, see relationships among factors

Knowledge

  • Physics — Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
  • Mathematics — Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Engineering and Technology — Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Computers and Electronics — Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

1 Excerpted from O*Net OnLine, US Department of Labor by the National Center for O*Net Development


Sample of Possible Occupations

Click Here to Expand Section

Aerodynamist
Geophysicist
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance
Aerospace Testing
High-Tech Designer
Lawyer
Technology Specialty
Cardiac Imaging Researcher
Mathematician
Chemical Physicist
Teacher
Computer Specialist
Medical Physicist
Computer System Engineer
Plasma Physicist
Nuclear Physicist
Hydrologist
Astrophysicist
Medical Devices Designer
Laboratory Technician
Physicist

Radiological Laboratory Director
Engineer
Meteorologist
Research & Development
Molecular Physicist
Seismologist
Technical Writer
Satellite Missions Analyst
Science Teacher
Science Writer
Agriculture Scientist
Environmental Health Specialist
Automotive Engineer
Environmental Analyst
Industrial Hygienist
Forensic Scientist
Occupational Safety Specialist
Oceanographer
Systems Analyst
Technical Illustrator
Stratigrapher

1 Excerpted from O*Net OnLine, US Department of Labor by the National Center for O*Net Development